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10 Health Benefits of Yoga Supported By Science

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health benefits of yoga
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Ever wondered what yoga does apart from making you touch your toes? Besides spiritual learning, modern science has also accepted the magical health benefits of yoga in the modern era. Yoga – derived from the Sanskrit word Yuj meaning ‘union’ is an ancient practice that is highly restorative and therapeutic for your body. It is rooted in the sacred land of India. It began as a spiritual practice in the beginning, but today, it is widely known for promoting mental and physical well-being.

Here are ten health benefits of yoga supported by science in the modern era:

1. Natural stress buster

Stress exhibits itself in many ways including physically, emotionally, and mentally but thank goodness yoga can ease us from stress and enhance relaxation. 

A study has shown that the regular practice of yoga can eliminate the secretion of cortisol – the primary stress hormone. The study was conducted on 24 emotionally distressed women. They were sent to a 3 month long yoga program. It was observed that after 3 months their cortisol levels dropped significantly. They also had a lower level of anxiety, stress, depression, and fatigue.

Yoga is highly beneficial in improving the quality of mental health and life. When you practice alone or along with other methods like meditation, it can be a helpful way to keep stress in check. It helps in the secretion of endorphins known as a natural stress and pain fighter. This hormone acts as a drug called codeine and morphine to help you feel relaxed.

2. Get rid of anxiety

Anxiety attacks are described as immediately escalating and unbearable. You can have anxiety attacks whenever you feel stressed with an unfamiliar environment. Additionally, you can feel  anxious because of mental and physical issues also. Anxiety attacks are characterized by shortness of breath, irregular heartbeat, muscle spasms, shaking, fatigue, and weakness.

Yoga is known as the best way to cope with the feeling of anxiety. It is interesting to know that research proves that yoga helps in reducing anxiety. It is not completely clear how yoga cures anxiety, however, yoga highlights the necessity of being present in the moment, finding a sense of peace, and helps in treating anxiety.

3. Reduced inflammation

The regular practice of yoga improves mental health and cures chronic inflammation. Inflammation is a general immune response, but severe inflammation can add to the development of pro-inflammatory diseases like diabetes, cancer, and heart diseases.

A study was done on 218 participants by dividing them into two groups. Both groups participated in strenuous and moderate exercises for inducing stress. The group who practiced yoga had a lower level of inflammatory elements than those who didn’t. Yoga helps protect you from certain diseases caused by inflammation. The advantageous effects of yoga on inflammation are still needed to be confirmed.

“Yoga begins with listening. When we listen, we are giving space to what is.” – Richard Freeman

4. Improved heart health

The health of our heart is crucial for maintaining normal functions like supplying tissues with necessary nutrients and pumping blood regularly to all the organs. Studies prove that practicing yoga regularly improves heart health and lowers the risk of heart diseases. 

A study was done on people aged over 40 years. They practiced yoga for 5 years. Results showed that they had a lower pulse rate and blood pressure than those who didn’t practice yoga. Many types of research also state that having a healthy lifestyle with yoga slows down the progression of heart diseases.

5. Quality of life

Yoga has become a general adjunct therapy for improving the quality of life for numerous individuals. A study was performed on 135 seniors. It showed that practicing yoga improves their quality of life and mood. Yoga also helps in reducing the symptoms of cancer and the effects of chemotherapy, such as vomiting and nausea. 

Another study states that yoga improves the quality of sleep, improves social functions, enhances spiritual well-being, and reduces the symptoms of depression and anxiety in cancer patients.

6. Yoga fights with depression

Yoga has antidepressant effects and helps in reducing the level of cortisol – a stress hormone that influences the level of serotonin – the neurotransmitter, which is often associated with depression.

During the study, participants (in an alcohol dependency program) were told to focus on yoga and rhythmic breathing. After two weeks, participants had a lower level of cortisol and symptoms of depression. Another study also proved the same. Acquired results showed that yoga helps in fighting with depression alone or with the help of traditional methods. 

7. Reduces chronic pain

Chronic pain can be a result of many severe causes from arthritis to injuries. Research has demonstrated that the regular practice of yoga reduces numerous types of chronic pain. In a study, 42 people suffering from carpal tunnel syndrome did yoga for eight weeks or received a wrist splint. People who practiced yoga had positive results by improving their grip strength and experiencing less pain than those who received a wrist splint. Another study states that yoga helps in decreasing pain and improves the physical function of people suffering from osteoarthritis of knees. 

“Yoga is a dance between control and surrender — between pushing and letting go — and when to push and when to let go becomes part of the creative process, part of the open-ended exploration of your being.” – Joel Kramer

8. Cures insomnia

Poor sleep quality is associated with high blood pressure, depression, and obesity, amongst other disorders. Studies show that incorporating yoga into your life helps in promoting better sleep. 

In a study, 69 elderly patients were assigned three different programs – practice yoga, be a part of the control group, or take herbal preparation. The group who were assigned to do yoga fell asleep quickly and slept for a long time, and were well-rested in the morning. 

Another study was performed on the patients of lymphoma. The regular practice of yoga decreased sleep disturbance, while improving the duration and quality of sleep. Yoga increases the secretion of melatonin – a hormone that regulates wakefulness and sleep. Yoga has notable effects on the causes of sleep issues such as anxiety, chronic pain, stress, and depression. 

9. Promotes flexibility and balance

Numerous people incorporate yoga into fitness routines for improving balance and flexibility. It’s well known that practicing yoga regularly improves your balance and flexibility. A study was performed on 66 older people. They were assigned to 2 different groups. One group was told to practice yoga and the other one was told to practice calisthenics. After one year, the flexibility of the yoga group increased 4 times as compared to the calisthenics group. 

According to a study in 2013, yoga can improve mobility and balance in older adults. Daily practice of yoga for just 15 to 30 minutes can make a big difference. It can enhance performance by improving balance and flexibility. 

10. Invigorates the nervous system 

It is crucial to have a strong nervous system that reacts to stress and relaxes in the absence of stressors. Unfortunately, numerous people fail to react in the absence of stressors. People who are often overstressed are prone to stroke and heart diseases. 

Stressed people also adopt unhealthy behaviors, such as overeating, physical inactivity, and smoking. A study shows that yoga and meditation help in keeping our body relaxed, calm, and working. It also reduces the chances of engaging in bad behaviors, which can affect your health. It reduces blood pressure and allows the body to be active. It also strengthens the nervous system.

Do you practice yoga? If so, what’s your favorite part about it? Let us know in the comments below!

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5 Indicators of Unresolved Attachment Trauma

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Emotional Attachment Trauma

Trauma caused during specific stages of a child’s development, known as attachment trauma, can have lasting effects on a person’s sense of safety, security, predictability, and trust. This type of trauma is often the result of abuse, neglect, or inconsistent care from a primary caregiver.

Individuals who have not fully processed attachment trauma may display similar patterns of behavior and physical or psychological symptoms that negatively impact their adult lives, including the choices they make in relationships and business.

Unfortunately, many people may not even be aware that they are struggling with trauma. Research estimates that 6% of the population will experience PTSD in their lifetime, with a majority of males and females having experienced significant trauma.

Unresolved attachment trauma can significantly impair the overall quality of a person’s life, including their ability to form healthy relationships and make positive choices for themselves. One well-known effect of unhealed attachment trauma is the compulsion to repeat past wounds by unconsciously selecting romantic partners who trigger their developmental trauma.

However, there are other less recognized but equally detrimental signs of unprocessed developmental trauma.

 

Five possible indications of unresolved attachment trauma are:

 

1.  Unconscious Sabotage

Self-sabotage is a common pattern among individuals with unprocessed attachment trauma. This cycle often begins with hurting others, which is then followed by hurting oneself. It is also common for those with attachment trauma to have heightened emotional sensitivity, which can trigger this cycle.

This pattern can manifest in lashing out, shutting down, or impulsive behavior that leads to feelings of guilt, shame, and self-loathing.

Many people with attachment trauma are not aware of their wounds and operate on survival mode, unconsciously testing or challenging the emotional investment of those around them, and pushing them away out of self-preservation and fear of abandonment.

This can lead to a pattern of making poor choices for themselves based on impulsivity.

 

2. Persistent Pain

 
Chronic pain is a common symptom that can stem from early trauma. Studies have shown a connection between physical conditions such as fibromyalgia, headaches, gastrointestinal issues, insomnia, muscle aches, back pain, chest pain, and chronic fatigue with the aftermath of chronic developmental trauma, particularly physical abuse.
 
Research has found that individuals with insecure attachment styles, such as anxious, avoidant, or disorganized, have a higher incidence of somatic symptoms and a history of physical and emotional abuse in childhood compared to those with a secure attachment style.
 
 

3. Behaviors That Block Out Trauma

 
Trauma blocking practises are used to avoid the pain and memories connected with traumatic events.
 
Emotional numbing, avoidance, and escape via briefly pleasurable activities that distract from terrible memories or suffering are common examples. Unfortunately, this escape habit stops people from successfully processing and recovering from their trauma.
 
Furthermore, when the pain resurfaces, more and more diversions are necessary to continue ignoring it. This can be seen in compulsive behaviours such as drug or alcohol addiction, emotional eating, numbing oneself through relationships, workaholism, excessive or dangerous exercise routines, compulsive internet or technology use, or any other compulsive behaviour used to distract yoursef from intrusive thoughts and emotions.
 
These actions have the potential to prolong a cycle of avoidance and repression, preventing persons from healing and progressing.
 

4. A strong need for control

 
It’s understandable that some people may struggle with control issues in their adult lives, especially if they felt helpless or vulnerable during their childhood.
 
This can happen if someone had an overbearing caregiver who didn’t let them make their own choices, expected too much from them, or didn’t take care of them properly. As adults, they might try to control everything in their life to feel more in control and less anxious or scared. This might be because they didn’t feel like they had control over their life when they were a child.
 
It’s important to remember that everyone’s experiences are different and it’s okay to seek help if you’re struggling with control issues.
 
 

5. Psychological Symptoms That Are Not Explained

 
Individuals with a history of developmental trauma may experience a range of psychological symptoms, including obsessive-compulsive behavior, intense mood swings, irritability, anger, depression, emotional numbing, or severe anxiety.
 
These symptoms can vary in intensity and may occur intermittently throughout the day. People with this type of trauma may attempt to “distract” themselves from these symptoms by denying or rationalizing them, or may resort to substance abuse or behavioral addictions as coping mechanisms. This can be a maladaptive way of trying to numb their symptoms.
 
 

What to do next if you’re suffering from emotional attachment trauma?

 
Everyone’s experience of healing from trauma is unique. It’s important to be aware of whether you have experienced childhood developmental trauma and how it may be affecting your relationships as an adult. Sometimes, the effects of trauma can be overwhelming and we may try to push them away or avoid them.
 
If you notice that you’re engaging in these behaviors, it’s important to seek help from a trauma therapist who can support you on your healing journey. Remember, you’re not alone and it’s never too late to start healing.
 

There are several ways that people can work to overcome emotional attachment trauma:

  1. Therapy: One of the most effective ways to overcome emotional attachment trauma is through therapy. A therapist can help you process your experiences, understand the impact of your trauma on your life, and develop coping strategies to manage symptoms.
  2. Support groups: Joining a support group of people who have had similar experiences can be a great way to find validation, empathy, and a sense of community.
  3. Mindfulness practices: Mindfulness practices such as meditation, pilates, prayer time with God or journaling can help you become more aware of your thoughts, emotions, and physical sensations, and develop a sense of spiritual connection and self-regulation.
  4. Trauma-focused cognitive-behavioral therapy (TF-CBT): This is a type of therapy that is specifically designed to help individuals process and recover from traumatic events.
  5. Building a safety net: Building a support system of people you trust, who are there for you when you need them, can help you feel more secure and safe in your life.

It’s important to remember that healing from emotional attachment trauma is a process and it may take time. It’s also important to find a therapist who is experienced in treating trauma, who you feel comfortable talking with, and who can help you develop a personalized treatment plan.

 
 
If you desire to work with me on healing your wounds and unlocking the aspects of you that were never realized so you can achieve more success in your life then head over to awebliss.com and join my weekly LIVE online mentorship calls.
 
 
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