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7 Things To Remember If You Dream To Have Your Own Business

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7 Things To Remember If You Dream To Have Your Own Business

It is about 7:00 PM Sunday now, and you are getting a sick feeling about going to work tomorrow. You must get up early on Monday morning and get ready for the office. Now even the distraction of the idiot-box could not stop this anxious feeling.

A thought strikes that you may feign sickness tomorrow and take one day – just one smallish day off but the client meetings and responsibilities at your office will not let you do so. You want an extra day’s rest from the dog-eat-dog corporate world but you cannot do so.

This anxiety is simply because you are not able to tap your inner bliss and passion. You are not living up to your best potential. Rather than being in the moment you are living more in the past or future. When you live a fulfilled life you spread happy moments throughout each day.There is something to enjoy even on Mondays, your boss does not look any different on Monday! Does he? Maybe you are not pursuing what you always wanted to do!

Maybe you wanted to have your own business, or become an entrepreneur or open a restaurant near your favourite location. Maybe you wanted to be a writer? Think back, what dreams did you have growing up? I am sure it’s not the Dilbert’s cubicle you dreamt of! Maybe you always a wanted a business which allows you to visit Paris, London, Zurich, Spain, Portugal, whole Europe and live for an extended period of time there. Maybe you wanted to go to wild safaris in Africa, snorkel in Australian reefs or watch Monasteries in Japan.

“Know yourself and you will win all battles.” – Lao Tzu

Due to family pressure and social norms you had to school yourself for ‘a good job’. When I was in college I wanted to have a business, what business? I had no idea. I did start a sales business but could not stick with it. Why? Because parental and social pressure says you must have a ‘good job’. I got into a good job but I always wanted something more, something that gives me freedom and passion.

Think of this freedom like your relationship. Suppose your partner always taunts you for your clothes, what would you do? You will push back like “I don’t need your free advice; I am OK (which you are).” But if your partner bought you brand new Fashion-TV type clothes and marvels how good you look then chances are you will look into the mirror and think “hmm… now this is something I like.”  Which will make the relationship grow strong.

The imperial corporate world is built differently by its ‘champions’ and ‘leaders’, because they mean only business. “Work hard and go home, keep your feelings with yourself.” Most importantly the current profile and enormous responsibility at your office are not translating your dreams into reality. The only hope of getting out of the rat-race in a job is winning the lottery.

I know you can’t just leave your job and get set for your dreams, unless you have a good chance of consistent stream of income. I know it is not that easy – but yeah with correct knowledge and drive we can fulfill our destiny.

Now working at a Fortune 500 Bank in Loans and Credits Department for six years I was always tempted to compare successful companies or businesses and their successful owners to losing companies and their losing owners. I have worked right from the front-line desk guys who consult prospects for loans (and their dreams); to the cabins where dreams of entrepreneurs are presented and sanctioned. I can tell you what I have learnt from many successful entrepreneurs and what I am observing to be working best.

Here are the 7 Lessons I have learned:

 

1. Interact and validate your business idea

If you want to open a restaurant, then go out and meet some successful restaurant owners. Winners are good at heart. You will be surprised by their readiness to teach an open young mind. They can tell you critical information about the suppliers, buyers, market condition and more.

If you wanted to be a real estate agent, then meet few agents in your locality. They will be able to provide you some insider knowledge that you must know to start. They may offer you commissions if you bring business to them, and this way you learn in the process.

You can contact on email or phone first and then take 15-20 minutes appointment. Before becoming a success coach I interacted with lots of people by email and Facebook. Some responded some didn’t, that’s OK. But I met some really nice souls this way and they motivated me to pursue my passion of becoming a success and life coach.

Another shortcut, take your banker out on lunch and ask them, how the industry is doing? Are the loans or other accounts doing well? If most of them are bad, it does not make any sense for you to enter, as many professionals are not making money in the industry.

 

2. Start taking baby steps towards what you want

Do some free work for people and you will discover some new knowledge in the field. You do not have to see the whole stair case to go up the stairs, just climb one step at a time.

Author, Mike Dooley observed that in his earlier business of selling T-shirts whenever he was out for marketing, even if he didn’t sell anything, someone at the office would receive an order. So make a definite plan and start taking action from today.

 

3. Winners are students throughout life

Brace yourself to learn entrepreneurship, marketing, communications, and networking. There are some things that you can outsource, but marketing, communications and maintaining relationships with your clients – you cannot and should not outsource that.

Learn as much as you possibly can about the industry you want to make a career in. A lot of people assume learning stops when you graduate High School or University. Little do they know that is when the learning actually begins.

Reading
 

4. Take a course in communication and marketing

If you did not take the course on communications at your college then take one now. You will be amazed to know how to communicate from your clients’ perspective, what do they want and critical non-verbal communications and body-language.

Most of the companies start with these types of courses during probation so maybe you have already done that. If not then make some arrangements this weekend. It can make or break your chances of success.

 

5. Do not become cocky at your new business

I have made costly mistakes of loaning to cocky people, assuming it is a sort of self-confidence. Cockiness can get you a few dates at the Pub but not long-term repeat clients. Nobody cares how hot your business idea may be.

Venture Capitalists, unlike bankers, are ruthless to break through cockiness and decide if the idea is viable or not. Take care of your clients like your own brothers and sisters and they will take care of your business and expand it.

 

6. Maintain savings for at least two years before you leave your job

Generally speaking new businesses often take somewhere around one to one-and-half years to break-even. You may break into profit even earlier also but it makes sense to have at least two years worth of savings with you.

If it is hard for you maybe due to the high credit card debt in our society then you must first pay off the debt as soon as possible before you even think of leaving your job and becoming an entrepreneur full-time.

“Only the educated are free.” – Epictetus

7. Take your business as a part time hobby first

Now before you go full-time in your business. You must have family responsibilities and rent to be paid. So instead of going all out with that restaurant plan, why not follow another plan and open a food-truck first, this way you accelerate your learning. Or if you want to become an author, complete your novel in free time and try to get it published.

Famous fiction Author, Stephen King, did not leave his teaching job long before he started earning enough from his published books. Thereafter, he churned out over fifty popular fiction books.

You must test the waters first and take an overall view for what it takes to launch a business. You will find water is deep indeed, but like Mr. Darby and his uncle of the famed story ‘Three Feet from Gold’ said, you must persist before you see the success you always wanted. Do remember to have fun throughout the journey.

 

You can visit my website here. I can show you how to live a more fulfilled life!

Thank you for reading my article! Please leave comments below!

Mohinish Nirwal is an upcoming underdog Success and life coach. His upcoming blog www.BoostBliss.com is a platform to interact with evolving souls who want to live a fulfilled life with more freedom.

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22 Comments

22 Comments

  1. satish

    Aug 12, 2015 at 12:00 pm

    Hi,

    when I first start reading your article I was shocked because it seems like I am reading my story from starting.

    All the condition , situation you have mentioned is totally right.

    Your article give me boost to take one step forward to fulfill my dreams.

    Thanks.

    • Mohinish Nirwal

      Aug 13, 2015 at 2:35 am

      I am glad Satish you are moving forward with your dreams..
      Thanks.

  2. Britney

    Jul 12, 2015 at 9:42 pm

    Great post! Thank you for sharing. I applaud your courage to pursue your true passions. My favorite points are #3 and #5. Being a 2014 college graduate, I quickly learned that life learning never stops. As you stated, a person must stay humble to continue to learn and grow. I wish you much continued success!!

    • Mohinish Nirwal

      Jul 13, 2015 at 1:38 am

      thanks Britney,
      I appreciate your attitude.
      thanks
      Mohinish

  3. Tony Kates

    Jul 8, 2015 at 1:49 pm

    I agree with every item on the list especially #3 “Winners are students throughout life”. The only way to win is to learn and the bigger lessons are learned when we failed which means you have to go out there, keep on trying, keep developing yourself and learn from everything.

    • Mohinish Nirwal

      Jul 9, 2015 at 2:32 am

      hello Tony,
      You are spot on. Winners are always on learning curve. And it usually not one subject.. Your thoughts?
      Thanks
      Mohinish

  4. Heather

    Jul 7, 2015 at 2:58 pm

    Hi Mohinish,
    Great post – lots to think about. I’ve run my own small consultancy for nearly 7 years now and can definitely say that #3 – continuing to be a student – has been key in helping me to build the business and adapt to different challenges and opportunities that have come my way.

    I couldn’t start small and build – I had to just make the leap – because my freelance business was in direct competition to what I did as an employee. And I certainly didn’t have 2 years savings as a cushion – although I did have around 6 months. Now I’m in the process of starting a new business, so it is slightly ‘back to the drawing board’. I came across your post at good time!

    Thanks,
    Heather

    • Mohinish Nirwal

      Jul 8, 2015 at 2:09 am

      well good luck for you new endeavor Heather.
      Thanks
      Mohinish

  5. David

    Jul 6, 2015 at 5:19 pm

    Great post thanks!

  6. bestessaysforsale.net

    Jul 6, 2015 at 12:37 pm

    I read this article and must admit it is really great! Thank you for your job!

  7. Radzone

    Jul 6, 2015 at 12:35 pm

    Your post was a great one to look at first thing on a Monday morning. It helps keep the dreams alive. Only one point that I “might” take exception with – it’s the point of having a 2-year cushion since most endeavours take about that long to get going. It’s true it might take that long, but having a fallback plan may allow some to cruise through the plan because there isn’t a sense of emergency. As Hernán Cortés said in 1519 – “Burn the Boats!”. I say go for it.

    • Mohinish Nirwal

      Jul 8, 2015 at 2:13 am

      Yeah I agree with that Radzone, but sometimes when people have to put food on the table they need to have savings. Secure the food part and unleash yourself in other. You can have passive sources of income also.
      Best wishes
      Mohinish

  8. Esther

    Jul 6, 2015 at 8:03 am

    Hi Nirwal,

    Thank you so much for this great post!

    I mostly hear about validation with your future prospects. But it is so true what you write, learning from those who are already successful in what you want to do can be priceless.

    But not everybody dears to reach out to experts. Which brings me to the point that having the right mindset is crucial throughout the 7 points you described.

    What do you think?

    Cheers,

    Esther

    • Mohinish Nirwal

      Jul 8, 2015 at 2:16 am

      Yeah whenever we reach out of our comfort zone our palms are sweaty. But with right mindset and courage an entrepreneur moves forward.
      Thanks
      Mohinish

  9. Dr.Manu

    Jul 6, 2015 at 7:00 am

    Great post and practical approach…Thank you

  10. willy braun

    Jul 6, 2015 at 6:33 am

    Great post

    Love reading the articles

    I have a question.

    What if you already started a business love it too but you didn’t take the these steps and now you find out that the water is way deeper then expected and it’s really hard to keep going. Is it possible to still come up from under it and become successful?
    And what would be most important steps to take?

    • Mohinish Nirwal

      Jul 8, 2015 at 2:37 pm

      hi, sorry for late reply.
      It will be very difficult to specify any action steps without taking a detailed look at your business. However I must add that before you entirely give up – bring in some expert and let him take a look. or if there are other people in your industry who are successful then you can reach out to them. But don’t take adverse decision without exploring all options.
      Thanks
      Mohinish

  11. Heitem Ak

    Jul 5, 2015 at 4:17 pm

    Great Post!

    “You do not have to see the whole stair case to go up the stairs, just climb one step at a time.”

    Sometimes you can try to jump an additional step or two, but if you do it too often, you’re asking for trouble!

    Heitem Ak

  12. KC Stafford

    Jul 5, 2015 at 3:22 pm

    Great post with good information! Thanks for sharing.

  13. Lisa

    Jul 5, 2015 at 12:51 pm

    Excellent post. I think I will be adding #4 Take a Marketing Course to my list of action items very soon…

  14. Anthony Metivier

    Jul 5, 2015 at 7:43 am

    Wow – great post. These are powerful tips that go beyond the usual.

    Validation is a huge one that I think so many people miss. The question is: How do you validate in baby steps if you’ve only got limited time to get just one part of it off your plate?

    • Mohinish Nirwal

      Jul 8, 2015 at 2:40 pm

      Hi Anthony,
      sorry for late reply.
      If you are not able to take out time for validation part then you can outsource or delegate it. Let your assistant collect all the data but you must do the analysis of it on your own. I hope it helps you.
      Thanks
      Mohinish

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Startups

Your Competition Is Magnificent – Quit Being A Sook

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I’ve got this friend and he’s always crying about the competition. He spends a lot of time sooking about them and coming up with plans to take them down.

I’ve put up with it for a while, but now it’s driving me nuts. I started to think: how can we learn to love our competition in business?

Here are some thoughts I had about your competition:

 

Thought #1 – You say they’re lying. Good!

My friend says his competition is lying. Many businesses lie and that’s fantastic news for you. When a business lies, they are playing the short game.

“The long game in business is about being so vulnerable, authentic and real that it punches your ideal customer in the face every time they hear about your brand”

Trust in business, leads to incredible progress. All those marketing campaigns your competitor’s use are mostly to make them sound like something they are not. When your business is trustworthy, you don’t need to market as much.

Being honest cuts through the hype and because it’s so rare, your ideal customer runs towards you at 110km, with their arms wide open. Right behind them are all of their network who are begging to hear from a business that is a real – a business that is like you and me.

Don’t hate your dishonest competition: learn to love them from the bottom of your heart. See the love in your competition.

 

Thought #2 – There’s enough room for everyone

This scarcity mindset that you have to own 100% of the market in your first three years of operations is bulldust. There’s room for you and your competitors. It’s not a sprint; it’s a marathon to reach the unicorn status that is success/world domination.

Feeling like you’re drowning in competition is exactly that. Focusing on your competition 24/7 makes you feel like absolute garbage after a while. It stops you from having a good night sleep full of dreams that contain growth, prosperity, optimism and triumph towards your businesses mission.

I used to be that guy that couldn’t sleep because of competition. Every time someone brought out the same product that was cheaper than mine, I cracked it. I thought that business was so hard because there were so many people that wanted to cut my lunch.

What I forgot is that despite all the competition, people were still buying. Even if we weren’t the cheapest, it didn’t matter. Some people would find us and buy, and others wouldn’t.

The competition can only cut your lunch for so long. If you stick at it and not let the thoughts of their horrible shadows upset you, you’ll be soon making the lunches and cutting theirs.

 

Thought #3 – It’s ugly

Sooking like a pissed off brown bear with a crown on its head is ugly. You’re showing everyone you work with that you are a sore loser. Winners worry about their own business first.

“Winners know that their business isn’t an immaculate diamond on day one”

Every time my friend complained about his competitors; it made his business seem ugly. I stopped becoming drawn to it as I did at the start. The conversations became more about his competitors than his own business. The focus was lost on competitors which he couldn’t control.

 

Thought #4 – You can’t win every deal

No business wins 100% of the opportunities that are presented. There’s this lie that you have to be always winning to be successful. There’s this belief that some people have that says their business is unique and therefore it’s only normal that when they pitch, they will always win.

Again, this is total BS. Your business might have some unique strengths, but there’s always competition. Some deals you’ll win and some deals you won’t. You don’t need to win all the time to put food on the table and be successful.

I’m also competitive by nature and I’ve had to settle sometimes for the simple fact that I won’t win all the time. Sometimes losing a deal is only the beginning. The opportunities you lose are where all the lessons are.

“Your lost opportunities are what strengthen your entire value proposition to the market”

 

Thought #5 – Seeing your competitors suck is inspiring

When a competitor of yours has a major failure, you should be inspired. What I mean is that you should never want your own client base to suffer the same gunshot to the head. Instead of trash talking your competitors for their mistakes, use them as inspiration to not be like them.

Your competitors should form part of the reason why you exist. You should exist not to make the same dumb mistakes they do. You should exist so your customers have a better alternative. Having horrendous companies within the same industry has inspired many businesses like Uber and Airbnb.

Being a business full of inspiring people is easier when everyone else sucks.

 

Thought #6 – Complaining shows insecurity

By my friend complaining about his competition, what he revealed to me was his insecurity. He was showing me that he lacked the confidence in his own product and so it made sense for him to talk down everyone else’s.

The thing is when you love your product and genuinely believe it’s the best in its field, you forget about everyone else’s. Believing in your product offering comes from the confidence that as a business you believe in yourselves.

If you believe, your ideal customer will believe. Bagging your competition may make you feel better in the short term, but it will never make your business grow.

Thought #7 – You only have so much thinking space

Don’t waste it thinking about your competitors. Use your thinking space to come up with new ideas, to innovate and to WOW your customers. These habits will stop you from living in the scarcity that comes with being obsessed by your competition.

Thinking about your competitors is not going to make them go away. Complaining about them will not improve your product or service. To have a good business, you have to operate from a place of creativity. Being creative is hard work and so you don’t want throw away your thinking space.

Dreaming about your competitors puts you in a spiral of negative thoughts. These thoughts start to overtake the positive ones and pretty soon you can’t be relentlessly optimistic anymore. It’s this optimism that helps you come up with ideas that will change the world.

Much like we compare ourselves to the lives we live through looking at other people’s social media, focusing on your competitor’s forces you to always believe you don’t have enough.

I’m here to say you are good enough. Your business is good enough. Your business can be one of the great’s.

 

Thought #8 – You can actually do business with your competitors

Here’s the really stupid thing: You can actually do business with your competitors. See, your business can’t fulfill every customer need. Instead of saying “We don’t do that,” use your competitors as referral partners.

I can remember in a business that I was a part of, where we used our competitors over the road to supply us with stock when we ran out and had items on back order. We would do the same thing for them when they ran out of stock. As a result, we always had stock.

“Our competitors over the road taught us lots of things we would have never known if we tried to play the solo game. Business is a team sport”

 

***Final thought***

Your competition is not the problem. They’re not the reason why you are losing sales. The real reason you are focused on your competition is because something is wrong with the way you are thinking. Your competitors can force you to sabotage your own success if you don’t stop focusing on them.

Complaining about your competitors never get’s you anywhere. The way to fast-track your success is to get intimate with your competitors and find a way to be uniquely you. Find a way to be bold, authentic, real, sexy and unwavering in your businesses values. Be the honest, cool company that is friends with everybody. That’s how you go from being a sook to being the best in your field.

I want you to use your competition to be world-class. You deserve it.

If you want to increase your productivity and learn some more valuable life hacks, then join my private mailing list on timdenning.net

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5 Ways to Avoid Burning Out While Building Your Business

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how to avoid burnout

Isn’t it strange how mundane things can bring back really vivid memories? As the burnt toast hit the trash, I remembered how burn out meant my first online business ended up on the scrapheap (nearly taking me with it). 

Juggling a full-time job, family, volunteering and running an online business left me physically, emotionally and psychologically exhausted. Just like toast, the burn creeps in slowly and when complete, you’re left unable to nourish yourself or anything else.

You may have already heard run-of-the-mill advice like taking regular breaks to prevent burn out. But what’s the point of stepping away from work only to be stressed that things will fall apart?

Here are five not-so-obvious ways to become burn out proof:

1. Create the right systems

Having no systems (or the wrong systems) is a recipe for disaster. Unfortunately, systems get a bad rap because they can be seen as snooze fests. Who’s ever heard of a sexy system? I sure haven’t!

To make matters worse, traditional systems have a sterile and stuffy image that can make some entrepreneurs feel boxed into something that’s unsuitable for their needs.

The key to making systems work for your business is to design them with flexibility, so your creativity isn’t stifled. Systems that curb burn out are those that account for the ‘secret sauce’ of how you do business. This ensures authenticity, even when your business grows. I call these flexible and personalized systems ‘productivity recipes.’ Because, just like normal recipes, you have the core ingredients and you can make tweaks to suit your business taste.

We’re all different, so there’s no one-size-fits-all business system. Productivity recipes focus on the human side of systems. They bring order to repetitive tasks while taking into account the quirks that make your business unique.

Productivity recipes stop burn out by preventing you from biting off more than you can chew, especially when your business is growing.

2. Get apps ‘talking’ to each other

Automation is another way to hand over repetitive and stressful work. Services like IFTTT and Zapier connect the apps you use to automate your workflow. In other words, they get rid of the biggest time sucks in your business.

Part of creating productivity recipes is to spot tasks you can automate. This will help your business run like a well-oiled machine and save you money when outsourcing.

Start out automating everyday tasks, like social media and email management, by finding out how the apps can ‘talk’ to each other.

Do yourself (and your health) a favour and start to create productivity recipes to see what you can automate. The aim is to drop repetitive tasks like a hot potato to reduce the risk of burnt out. Get your apps communicating to free up time to chat with friends and family.

“The first rule of any technology used in a business is that automation applied to an efficient operation will magnify the efficiency. The second is that automation applied to an inefficient operation will magnify the inefficiency.” – Bill Gates

3. Outsource

Outsourcing should be done when you already have productivity recipes in place. It’s tempting to hand over parts of your business to a VA or freelancer and forget about it, but this approach could land you in hot water.

With productivity recipes, anyone you hire will have the blueprint of how you expect things to be done. You’ll also save time getting new hires up to speed. Most importantly, your clients won’t get any nasty surprises or unwelcome changes when you grow your team.

You’ll be able to take time out to recharge your batteries, having all the confidence that your business will continue to function properly in your absence.

4. Find some cheerleaders

Being part of a supportive group is crucial to making yourself burn out proof. Informal groups, like Facebook communities, are helpful networks that can prevent you going down the burn out road.

If you’ve been working non-stop and your brain feels as limp as the lettuce in the sandwich you’ve been too busy to eat, connect with people who can identify with where you are and encourage you to take a step back.

The best groups are those that aren’t strictly business. Look for a group with dedicated days for sharing things like inspirational quotes and jokes to lighten things up a little.

Feeling like you’re the only one who experiences overwhelm can be a lonely place. Being part of a community where people share their struggles helps to provide perspective that you can achieve your goals without compromising your health.

“Be strong, be fearless, be beautiful. And believe that anything is possible when you have the right people there to support you.” – Misty Copeland

5. Inject your personality into your passion

When you’re passionate about your work, it seems like you can work day and night without ever feeling tired. Of course, it’s advisable to make time for proper rest. I’ve found that, the more I enjoy work, the more I look after myself to reduce the risks of becoming ill. I’m passionate about helping entrepreneurs be more productive to avoid burn out. I’m also a huge foodie. That’s why I incorporate food and drink analogies in my work because being fed and watered is something we can all relate to.

Injecting your personality into your work makes everything easier. It’s very draining pretending to be someone you’re not. If you’re already pursuing your passion, add a splash of your personality to reduce the chance of burn out.

Suffering from burn out is a serious setback to your health and business. It’s a relief to know that, unlike the burnt toast that ends up in the trash, you can make a full recovery from burn out. But why take the risk in the first place? Put in place practical measures to avoid getting burnt when the heat is turned up in your business.

It’s good to share. What do you put in place to make sure you don’t burn out? Leave a comment below and share your thoughts.

How do you avoid burning out when things get tough? Let us know by commenting below!

Image courtesy of Twenty20.com

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3 Lessons I Learned From the Failure of My First Startup

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startup failure

You’re exhausted. You’ve put countless of hours into an idea that you believed in so much. Literally almost blood, sweat and tears were sacrificed for this vision to be accomplished. You had hoped and expected for a lot of things, and was excited to have plans for the future.

A few months ago, I wrote an article here titled, “What I Learned After Opening My First Business at 21.” My restaurant was doing well that time, and writing that article made me feel on top of the world. I thought that it was going to be that way for a long time, yet not so long after that, sales started to become stagnant and then declined.

As I write this today, my restaurant has already stopped operations. It stopped a few days ago, but a couple months back, I knew it was bound to happen. We couldn’t keep up with the bills we needed to pay, and they kept accumulating day by day. With a heavy heart and chaotic mind, we knew we had to close it down.

I couldn’t believe this was happening barely one year after starting operations. But if you were to ask me that if I had the chance to start over, would I do it again? I would still say yes. Despite its failure, there were still very important (also expensive) lessons that I learned that I would never have acquired otherwise if I didn’t start the business.

Here are a few lessons I learned after failing my first startup:

1. Entrepreneurship requires resilience

You cannot ever be successful if you haven’t developed resilience. Whether you like it or not, something will turn out wrong in your business. Maybe sometimes not to the point that it needs to be shut down, but something that could make your decisions critical to your organization goals.

You could give yourself time to grieve, but it shouldn’t stop there. Life goes on. And you need to get back on your feet if you still want to make a difference. The biggest companies that are successful right now all experienced a massive amount of failure.

But they never stopped trying. Because with every failure comes a lesson. Anyone with common sense would learn from that failure, and start again with more knowledge on what to do and what not to do.

Whenever I thought about the accumulated debts of my restaurant, I would have this sinking feeling in my chest and stomach. I knew that I would have to liquidate the assets. So I continued to search for buyers of the assets.

Instead of grieving for a much longer period, I knew I’d have to pick myself back up again so I could pay the debt. It might be hard at first, but if you call yourself an entrepreneur, quitting is not an option. We fail, we learn, then get back up.

“Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts.” – Winston Churchill

2. Learn to listen

Being a first-time founder, I had a very idealistic attitude. I had no experience in the food industry and established the business with only the belief that my partners and I would make it. I was wrong.

Aside from not being able to make it with that business, I realized what the naysayers had been telling me all along. But you have to be careful here. There are naysayers who have no credibility to back up what they say and want to bring you down. But there are also ones who speak from experience and are genuinely concerned for you. You must learn to discern the right voices to listen to if you want to succeed.

Taking risks is good, but make sure those risks are calculated and not reckless. We took a risk that wasn’t entirely reckless, but not all aspects of them were calculated. We were unsure of some parts of the business, and just “winged” it. Look at what happened to winging it!

Know when you need to jump with both feet or just one, but also listen to the voices who tell you when to put your feet in the water. Trust me, you never know when you will value their input.

3. Your failures do not define you

I never thought this would take a toll on my self-esteem, even when I knew I had to get back up. On the outside I looked normal. Going to school, work, and social settings looking like nothing had happened. But inside I was a wreck and didn’t want to admit it.

I would feel guilty whenever people would praise me about how “successful” I was at such a young age but that wasn’t true. For a while I thought that I was the failure. My insecurities started haunting me again and my browser history was filled with questions on what to do.

That was when I discovered that successful people failed more often than they succeeded. Even the ones with smaller businesses had their fair share of failures before finding an idea that worked for them.

But their failures never got to their heart. They weren’t the failures. The business failed, not them. So they tried again until they got it right. Maybe this business didn’t work out for me, but that doesn’t mean I’ll never be successful. The sooner you believe your failures don’t define you, the more the weight will be lifted off your shoulders.

People fail every single day. The difference between the ones who succeed and those who don’t is persistence and the drive to continue even after failing. It’s much better to try and fail than never having to start and learn nothing.

“Success is not a good teacher, failure makes you humble.” – Shah Rukh Khan

Have you ever started a business that eventually failed? What did you learn from it? Please leave your experiences below!
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Want A Business Idea That’s Guaranteed To Make You Money? Here’s How You Should Start.

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Let’s first start off with the “why”. When you know why you’re doing something, it can create clarity in your tasks, and direct your efforts. So, grab a sheet of paper, or a notebook and let’s get started.

Answer this question: Why do I want to start a business? Here are some common answers.

  • to do something I love
  • to create financial freedom so I can, “fill in the blank” (travel, pay off debts, buy expensive things, etc.)
  • to have the freedom to set my hours, choose when I work and what I work on
  • to help others, using my skills
  • I hate my job

Once you know why you’re doing it, you’ll have a better idea of what your goals are.

“The two most important days of your life are the day you were born and the day you discover why you were born.” – Mark Twain

Start With Your Skills

At the heart of every business, and profession is the solution to a problem. If you can identify a problem that a group of people are having and solve it for them, you have the makings of a successful business.

Start with your current skill set. Everyone has skills, passions and talents in one area or another. What we fail to sometimes see is the ability for those skills to solve a problem for others in a meaningful way.

You can also ask family and friends to help you identify your skills. They may point out strengths you never considered. Keep in mind you don’t need to have mastered that skill yet, you can continue to learn and develop it as you go along. Ray Higdon a successful business man says to “Invest, learn then teach”.

Invest in yourself and improving your skills, learn more about your niche, and creating solutions to their problems, then teach others what you’ve learned.

Once you’ve got that down, the next step is doing some research. What problems are people having that you could use your current skill set to help solve? This is where picking a niche comes in handy. A niche refers to a small specialized portion of the population.

Let’s say, you’re a stay at home parent, and one of your skills is cooking healthy family meals that your kids enjoy. Your niche will likely be stay at home parents. You can then narrow down your search by checking forums and website or magazines that target stay at home parents.

“If you do what you love, it is the best way to relax.” – Christian Louboutin

What To Look For in Your Research?

Look for pain points and problems, especially those that are recurring. You may find that cooking healthy meals is not necessarily where parents are struggling, maybe it’s with purchasing healthy foods or the cost (money and time) of healthy meals. You want to look at the questions people are asking, and take note of the language they use to describe their problems. Nutritious vs. healthy. Quick vs. easy.

Finally, take note of products that offer solutions to those problems. These offer ideas to you about ways in which you can present your solution; Youtube channels, specialized cookbooks, how-to guides, online courses, etc.

By the time you’ve followed all these steps, you would have established 3 things:

  1. A monetizable skill set — You know what your skills are and how you can use them
  2. Proof of a Need — People have a problem that you can solve, and now you know who they are.
  3. A Profitable Market — If people are buying said cookbooks, or paying for products, this shows you that they are willing to put their money where their mouth is.

This is the beginning of any business. Fast Food restaurants offer quick meals on the go, Walmart puts everything in one place so people don’t have to travel to different stores, books entertain or instruct, cars transport and save time. At the heart of every product and business is a need, and you are now on your way to creating a solution that people are already looking for!

What is a business you want to start? Share your thoughts below!

Image courtesy of Twenty20.com

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5 Important Facts You Need to Know About Motivation

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Whether you are trying to lead a team of employees, teach a child, or even get through your own workday, staying motivated is key. Nonetheless, this isn’t always as easy as waking up and deciding to be motivated. (more…)

Kurtis Brase is a professional journalist. Now, she works at EssayPro as a writer and editor.

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22 Comments

22 Comments

  1. satish

    Aug 12, 2015 at 12:00 pm

    Hi,

    when I first start reading your article I was shocked because it seems like I am reading my story from starting.

    All the condition , situation you have mentioned is totally right.

    Your article give me boost to take one step forward to fulfill my dreams.

    Thanks.

    • Mohinish Nirwal

      Aug 13, 2015 at 2:35 am

      I am glad Satish you are moving forward with your dreams..
      Thanks.

  2. Britney

    Jul 12, 2015 at 9:42 pm

    Great post! Thank you for sharing. I applaud your courage to pursue your true passions. My favorite points are #3 and #5. Being a 2014 college graduate, I quickly learned that life learning never stops. As you stated, a person must stay humble to continue to learn and grow. I wish you much continued success!!

    • Mohinish Nirwal

      Jul 13, 2015 at 1:38 am

      thanks Britney,
      I appreciate your attitude.
      thanks
      Mohinish

  3. Tony Kates

    Jul 8, 2015 at 1:49 pm

    I agree with every item on the list especially #3 “Winners are students throughout life”. The only way to win is to learn and the bigger lessons are learned when we failed which means you have to go out there, keep on trying, keep developing yourself and learn from everything.

    • Mohinish Nirwal

      Jul 9, 2015 at 2:32 am

      hello Tony,
      You are spot on. Winners are always on learning curve. And it usually not one subject.. Your thoughts?
      Thanks
      Mohinish

  4. Heather

    Jul 7, 2015 at 2:58 pm

    Hi Mohinish,
    Great post – lots to think about. I’ve run my own small consultancy for nearly 7 years now and can definitely say that #3 – continuing to be a student – has been key in helping me to build the business and adapt to different challenges and opportunities that have come my way.

    I couldn’t start small and build – I had to just make the leap – because my freelance business was in direct competition to what I did as an employee. And I certainly didn’t have 2 years savings as a cushion – although I did have around 6 months. Now I’m in the process of starting a new business, so it is slightly ‘back to the drawing board’. I came across your post at good time!

    Thanks,
    Heather

    • Mohinish Nirwal

      Jul 8, 2015 at 2:09 am

      well good luck for you new endeavor Heather.
      Thanks
      Mohinish

  5. David

    Jul 6, 2015 at 5:19 pm

    Great post thanks!

  6. bestessaysforsale.net

    Jul 6, 2015 at 12:37 pm

    I read this article and must admit it is really great! Thank you for your job!

  7. Radzone

    Jul 6, 2015 at 12:35 pm

    Your post was a great one to look at first thing on a Monday morning. It helps keep the dreams alive. Only one point that I “might” take exception with – it’s the point of having a 2-year cushion since most endeavours take about that long to get going. It’s true it might take that long, but having a fallback plan may allow some to cruise through the plan because there isn’t a sense of emergency. As Hernán Cortés said in 1519 – “Burn the Boats!”. I say go for it.

    • Mohinish Nirwal

      Jul 8, 2015 at 2:13 am

      Yeah I agree with that Radzone, but sometimes when people have to put food on the table they need to have savings. Secure the food part and unleash yourself in other. You can have passive sources of income also.
      Best wishes
      Mohinish

  8. Esther

    Jul 6, 2015 at 8:03 am

    Hi Nirwal,

    Thank you so much for this great post!

    I mostly hear about validation with your future prospects. But it is so true what you write, learning from those who are already successful in what you want to do can be priceless.

    But not everybody dears to reach out to experts. Which brings me to the point that having the right mindset is crucial throughout the 7 points you described.

    What do you think?

    Cheers,

    Esther

    • Mohinish Nirwal

      Jul 8, 2015 at 2:16 am

      Yeah whenever we reach out of our comfort zone our palms are sweaty. But with right mindset and courage an entrepreneur moves forward.
      Thanks
      Mohinish

  9. Dr.Manu

    Jul 6, 2015 at 7:00 am

    Great post and practical approach…Thank you

  10. willy braun

    Jul 6, 2015 at 6:33 am

    Great post

    Love reading the articles

    I have a question.

    What if you already started a business love it too but you didn’t take the these steps and now you find out that the water is way deeper then expected and it’s really hard to keep going. Is it possible to still come up from under it and become successful?
    And what would be most important steps to take?

    • Mohinish Nirwal

      Jul 8, 2015 at 2:37 pm

      hi, sorry for late reply.
      It will be very difficult to specify any action steps without taking a detailed look at your business. However I must add that before you entirely give up – bring in some expert and let him take a look. or if there are other people in your industry who are successful then you can reach out to them. But don’t take adverse decision without exploring all options.
      Thanks
      Mohinish

  11. Heitem Ak

    Jul 5, 2015 at 4:17 pm

    Great Post!

    “You do not have to see the whole stair case to go up the stairs, just climb one step at a time.”

    Sometimes you can try to jump an additional step or two, but if you do it too often, you’re asking for trouble!

    Heitem Ak

  12. KC Stafford

    Jul 5, 2015 at 3:22 pm

    Great post with good information! Thanks for sharing.

  13. Lisa

    Jul 5, 2015 at 12:51 pm

    Excellent post. I think I will be adding #4 Take a Marketing Course to my list of action items very soon…

  14. Anthony Metivier

    Jul 5, 2015 at 7:43 am

    Wow – great post. These are powerful tips that go beyond the usual.

    Validation is a huge one that I think so many people miss. The question is: How do you validate in baby steps if you’ve only got limited time to get just one part of it off your plate?

    • Mohinish Nirwal

      Jul 8, 2015 at 2:40 pm

      Hi Anthony,
      sorry for late reply.
      If you are not able to take out time for validation part then you can outsource or delegate it. Let your assistant collect all the data but you must do the analysis of it on your own. I hope it helps you.
      Thanks
      Mohinish

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Startups

Your Competition Is Magnificent – Quit Being A Sook

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I’ve got this friend and he’s always crying about the competition. He spends a lot of time sooking about them and coming up with plans to take them down.

I’ve put up with it for a while, but now it’s driving me nuts. I started to think: how can we learn to love our competition in business?

Here are some thoughts I had about your competition:

 

Thought #1 – You say they’re lying. Good!

My friend says his competition is lying. Many businesses lie and that’s fantastic news for you. When a business lies, they are playing the short game.

“The long game in business is about being so vulnerable, authentic and real that it punches your ideal customer in the face every time they hear about your brand”

Trust in business, leads to incredible progress. All those marketing campaigns your competitor’s use are mostly to make them sound like something they are not. When your business is trustworthy, you don’t need to market as much.

Being honest cuts through the hype and because it’s so rare, your ideal customer runs towards you at 110km, with their arms wide open. Right behind them are all of their network who are begging to hear from a business that is a real – a business that is like you and me.

Don’t hate your dishonest competition: learn to love them from the bottom of your heart. See the love in your competition.

 

Thought #2 – There’s enough room for everyone

This scarcity mindset that you have to own 100% of the market in your first three years of operations is bulldust. There’s room for you and your competitors. It’s not a sprint; it’s a marathon to reach the unicorn status that is success/world domination.

Feeling like you’re drowning in competition is exactly that. Focusing on your competition 24/7 makes you feel like absolute garbage after a while. It stops you from having a good night sleep full of dreams that contain growth, prosperity, optimism and triumph towards your businesses mission.

I used to be that guy that couldn’t sleep because of competition. Every time someone brought out the same product that was cheaper than mine, I cracked it. I thought that business was so hard because there were so many people that wanted to cut my lunch.

What I forgot is that despite all the competition, people were still buying. Even if we weren’t the cheapest, it didn’t matter. Some people would find us and buy, and others wouldn’t.

The competition can only cut your lunch for so long. If you stick at it and not let the thoughts of their horrible shadows upset you, you’ll be soon making the lunches and cutting theirs.

 

Thought #3 – It’s ugly

Sooking like a pissed off brown bear with a crown on its head is ugly. You’re showing everyone you work with that you are a sore loser. Winners worry about their own business first.

“Winners know that their business isn’t an immaculate diamond on day one”

Every time my friend complained about his competitors; it made his business seem ugly. I stopped becoming drawn to it as I did at the start. The conversations became more about his competitors than his own business. The focus was lost on competitors which he couldn’t control.

 

Thought #4 – You can’t win every deal

No business wins 100% of the opportunities that are presented. There’s this lie that you have to be always winning to be successful. There’s this belief that some people have that says their business is unique and therefore it’s only normal that when they pitch, they will always win.

Again, this is total BS. Your business might have some unique strengths, but there’s always competition. Some deals you’ll win and some deals you won’t. You don’t need to win all the time to put food on the table and be successful.

I’m also competitive by nature and I’ve had to settle sometimes for the simple fact that I won’t win all the time. Sometimes losing a deal is only the beginning. The opportunities you lose are where all the lessons are.

“Your lost opportunities are what strengthen your entire value proposition to the market”

 

Thought #5 – Seeing your competitors suck is inspiring

When a competitor of yours has a major failure, you should be inspired. What I mean is that you should never want your own client base to suffer the same gunshot to the head. Instead of trash talking your competitors for their mistakes, use them as inspiration to not be like them.

Your competitors should form part of the reason why you exist. You should exist not to make the same dumb mistakes they do. You should exist so your customers have a better alternative. Having horrendous companies within the same industry has inspired many businesses like Uber and Airbnb.

Being a business full of inspiring people is easier when everyone else sucks.

 

Thought #6 – Complaining shows insecurity

By my friend complaining about his competition, what he revealed to me was his insecurity. He was showing me that he lacked the confidence in his own product and so it made sense for him to talk down everyone else’s.

The thing is when you love your product and genuinely believe it’s the best in its field, you forget about everyone else’s. Believing in your product offering comes from the confidence that as a business you believe in yourselves.

If you believe, your ideal customer will believe. Bagging your competition may make you feel better in the short term, but it will never make your business grow.

Thought #7 – You only have so much thinking space

Don’t waste it thinking about your competitors. Use your thinking space to come up with new ideas, to innovate and to WOW your customers. These habits will stop you from living in the scarcity that comes with being obsessed by your competition.

Thinking about your competitors is not going to make them go away. Complaining about them will not improve your product or service. To have a good business, you have to operate from a place of creativity. Being creative is hard work and so you don’t want throw away your thinking space.

Dreaming about your competitors puts you in a spiral of negative thoughts. These thoughts start to overtake the positive ones and pretty soon you can’t be relentlessly optimistic anymore. It’s this optimism that helps you come up with ideas that will change the world.

Much like we compare ourselves to the lives we live through looking at other people’s social media, focusing on your competitor’s forces you to always believe you don’t have enough.

I’m here to say you are good enough. Your business is good enough. Your business can be one of the great’s.

 

Thought #8 – You can actually do business with your competitors

Here’s the really stupid thing: You can actually do business with your competitors. See, your business can’t fulfill every customer need. Instead of saying “We don’t do that,” use your competitors as referral partners.

I can remember in a business that I was a part of, where we used our competitors over the road to supply us with stock when we ran out and had items on back order. We would do the same thing for them when they ran out of stock. As a result, we always had stock.

“Our competitors over the road taught us lots of things we would have never known if we tried to play the solo game. Business is a team sport”

 

***Final thought***

Your competition is not the problem. They’re not the reason why you are losing sales. The real reason you are focused on your competition is because something is wrong with the way you are thinking. Your competitors can force you to sabotage your own success if you don’t stop focusing on them.

Complaining about your competitors never get’s you anywhere. The way to fast-track your success is to get intimate with your competitors and find a way to be uniquely you. Find a way to be bold, authentic, real, sexy and unwavering in your businesses values. Be the honest, cool company that is friends with everybody. That’s how you go from being a sook to being the best in your field.

I want you to use your competition to be world-class. You deserve it.

If you want to increase your productivity and learn some more valuable life hacks, then join my private mailing list on timdenning.net

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5 Ways to Avoid Burning Out While Building Your Business

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Isn’t it strange how mundane things can bring back really vivid memories? As the burnt toast hit the trash, I remembered how burn out meant my first online business ended up on the scrapheap (nearly taking me with it). 

Juggling a full-time job, family, volunteering and running an online business left me physically, emotionally and psychologically exhausted. Just like toast, the burn creeps in slowly and when complete, you’re left unable to nourish yourself or anything else.

You may have already heard run-of-the-mill advice like taking regular breaks to prevent burn out. But what’s the point of stepping away from work only to be stressed that things will fall apart?

Here are five not-so-obvious ways to become burn out proof:

1. Create the right systems

Having no systems (or the wrong systems) is a recipe for disaster. Unfortunately, systems get a bad rap because they can be seen as snooze fests. Who’s ever heard of a sexy system? I sure haven’t!

To make matters worse, traditional systems have a sterile and stuffy image that can make some entrepreneurs feel boxed into something that’s unsuitable for their needs.

The key to making systems work for your business is to design them with flexibility, so your creativity isn’t stifled. Systems that curb burn out are those that account for the ‘secret sauce’ of how you do business. This ensures authenticity, even when your business grows. I call these flexible and personalized systems ‘productivity recipes.’ Because, just like normal recipes, you have the core ingredients and you can make tweaks to suit your business taste.

We’re all different, so there’s no one-size-fits-all business system. Productivity recipes focus on the human side of systems. They bring order to repetitive tasks while taking into account the quirks that make your business unique.

Productivity recipes stop burn out by preventing you from biting off more than you can chew, especially when your business is growing.

2. Get apps ‘talking’ to each other

Automation is another way to hand over repetitive and stressful work. Services like IFTTT and Zapier connect the apps you use to automate your workflow. In other words, they get rid of the biggest time sucks in your business.

Part of creating productivity recipes is to spot tasks you can automate. This will help your business run like a well-oiled machine and save you money when outsourcing.

Start out automating everyday tasks, like social media and email management, by finding out how the apps can ‘talk’ to each other.

Do yourself (and your health) a favour and start to create productivity recipes to see what you can automate. The aim is to drop repetitive tasks like a hot potato to reduce the risk of burnt out. Get your apps communicating to free up time to chat with friends and family.

“The first rule of any technology used in a business is that automation applied to an efficient operation will magnify the efficiency. The second is that automation applied to an inefficient operation will magnify the inefficiency.” – Bill Gates

3. Outsource

Outsourcing should be done when you already have productivity recipes in place. It’s tempting to hand over parts of your business to a VA or freelancer and forget about it, but this approach could land you in hot water.

With productivity recipes, anyone you hire will have the blueprint of how you expect things to be done. You’ll also save time getting new hires up to speed. Most importantly, your clients won’t get any nasty surprises or unwelcome changes when you grow your team.

You’ll be able to take time out to recharge your batteries, having all the confidence that your business will continue to function properly in your absence.

4. Find some cheerleaders

Being part of a supportive group is crucial to making yourself burn out proof. Informal groups, like Facebook communities, are helpful networks that can prevent you going down the burn out road.

If you’ve been working non-stop and your brain feels as limp as the lettuce in the sandwich you’ve been too busy to eat, connect with people who can identify with where you are and encourage you to take a step back.

The best groups are those that aren’t strictly business. Look for a group with dedicated days for sharing things like inspirational quotes and jokes to lighten things up a little.

Feeling like you’re the only one who experiences overwhelm can be a lonely place. Being part of a community where people share their struggles helps to provide perspective that you can achieve your goals without compromising your health.

“Be strong, be fearless, be beautiful. And believe that anything is possible when you have the right people there to support you.” – Misty Copeland

5. Inject your personality into your passion

When you’re passionate about your work, it seems like you can work day and night without ever feeling tired. Of course, it’s advisable to make time for proper rest. I’ve found that, the more I enjoy work, the more I look after myself to reduce the risks of becoming ill. I’m passionate about helping entrepreneurs be more productive to avoid burn out. I’m also a huge foodie. That’s why I incorporate food and drink analogies in my work because being fed and watered is something we can all relate to.

Injecting your personality into your work makes everything easier. It’s very draining pretending to be someone you’re not. If you’re already pursuing your passion, add a splash of your personality to reduce the chance of burn out.

Suffering from burn out is a serious setback to your health and business. It’s a relief to know that, unlike the burnt toast that ends up in the trash, you can make a full recovery from burn out. But why take the risk in the first place? Put in place practical measures to avoid getting burnt when the heat is turned up in your business.

It’s good to share. What do you put in place to make sure you don’t burn out? Leave a comment below and share your thoughts.

How do you avoid burning out when things get tough? Let us know by commenting below!

Image courtesy of Twenty20.com

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3 Lessons I Learned From the Failure of My First Startup

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You’re exhausted. You’ve put countless of hours into an idea that you believed in so much. Literally almost blood, sweat and tears were sacrificed for this vision to be accomplished. You had hoped and expected for a lot of things, and was excited to have plans for the future.

A few months ago, I wrote an article here titled, “What I Learned After Opening My First Business at 21.” My restaurant was doing well that time, and writing that article made me feel on top of the world. I thought that it was going to be that way for a long time, yet not so long after that, sales started to become stagnant and then declined.

As I write this today, my restaurant has already stopped operations. It stopped a few days ago, but a couple months back, I knew it was bound to happen. We couldn’t keep up with the bills we needed to pay, and they kept accumulating day by day. With a heavy heart and chaotic mind, we knew we had to close it down.

I couldn’t believe this was happening barely one year after starting operations. But if you were to ask me that if I had the chance to start over, would I do it again? I would still say yes. Despite its failure, there were still very important (also expensive) lessons that I learned that I would never have acquired otherwise if I didn’t start the business.

Here are a few lessons I learned after failing my first startup:

1. Entrepreneurship requires resilience

You cannot ever be successful if you haven’t developed resilience. Whether you like it or not, something will turn out wrong in your business. Maybe sometimes not to the point that it needs to be shut down, but something that could make your decisions critical to your organization goals.

You could give yourself time to grieve, but it shouldn’t stop there. Life goes on. And you need to get back on your feet if you still want to make a difference. The biggest companies that are successful right now all experienced a massive amount of failure.

But they never stopped trying. Because with every failure comes a lesson. Anyone with common sense would learn from that failure, and start again with more knowledge on what to do and what not to do.

Whenever I thought about the accumulated debts of my restaurant, I would have this sinking feeling in my chest and stomach. I knew that I would have to liquidate the assets. So I continued to search for buyers of the assets.

Instead of grieving for a much longer period, I knew I’d have to pick myself back up again so I could pay the debt. It might be hard at first, but if you call yourself an entrepreneur, quitting is not an option. We fail, we learn, then get back up.

“Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts.” – Winston Churchill

2. Learn to listen

Being a first-time founder, I had a very idealistic attitude. I had no experience in the food industry and established the business with only the belief that my partners and I would make it. I was wrong.

Aside from not being able to make it with that business, I realized what the naysayers had been telling me all along. But you have to be careful here. There are naysayers who have no credibility to back up what they say and want to bring you down. But there are also ones who speak from experience and are genuinely concerned for you. You must learn to discern the right voices to listen to if you want to succeed.

Taking risks is good, but make sure those risks are calculated and not reckless. We took a risk that wasn’t entirely reckless, but not all aspects of them were calculated. We were unsure of some parts of the business, and just “winged” it. Look at what happened to winging it!

Know when you need to jump with both feet or just one, but also listen to the voices who tell you when to put your feet in the water. Trust me, you never know when you will value their input.

3. Your failures do not define you

I never thought this would take a toll on my self-esteem, even when I knew I had to get back up. On the outside I looked normal. Going to school, work, and social settings looking like nothing had happened. But inside I was a wreck and didn’t want to admit it.

I would feel guilty whenever people would praise me about how “successful” I was at such a young age but that wasn’t true. For a while I thought that I was the failure. My insecurities started haunting me again and my browser history was filled with questions on what to do.

That was when I discovered that successful people failed more often than they succeeded. Even the ones with smaller businesses had their fair share of failures before finding an idea that worked for them.

But their failures never got to their heart. They weren’t the failures. The business failed, not them. So they tried again until they got it right. Maybe this business didn’t work out for me, but that doesn’t mean I’ll never be successful. The sooner you believe your failures don’t define you, the more the weight will be lifted off your shoulders.

People fail every single day. The difference between the ones who succeed and those who don’t is persistence and the drive to continue even after failing. It’s much better to try and fail than never having to start and learn nothing.

“Success is not a good teacher, failure makes you humble.” – Shah Rukh Khan

Have you ever started a business that eventually failed? What did you learn from it? Please leave your experiences below!
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Want A Business Idea That’s Guaranteed To Make You Money? Here’s How You Should Start.

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Let’s first start off with the “why”. When you know why you’re doing something, it can create clarity in your tasks, and direct your efforts. So, grab a sheet of paper, or a notebook and let’s get started.

Answer this question: Why do I want to start a business? Here are some common answers.

  • to do something I love
  • to create financial freedom so I can, “fill in the blank” (travel, pay off debts, buy expensive things, etc.)
  • to have the freedom to set my hours, choose when I work and what I work on
  • to help others, using my skills
  • I hate my job

Once you know why you’re doing it, you’ll have a better idea of what your goals are.

“The two most important days of your life are the day you were born and the day you discover why you were born.” – Mark Twain

Start With Your Skills

At the heart of every business, and profession is the solution to a problem. If you can identify a problem that a group of people are having and solve it for them, you have the makings of a successful business.

Start with your current skill set. Everyone has skills, passions and talents in one area or another. What we fail to sometimes see is the ability for those skills to solve a problem for others in a meaningful way.

You can also ask family and friends to help you identify your skills. They may point out strengths you never considered. Keep in mind you don’t need to have mastered that skill yet, you can continue to learn and develop it as you go along. Ray Higdon a successful business man says to “Invest, learn then teach”.

Invest in yourself and improving your skills, learn more about your niche, and creating solutions to their problems, then teach others what you’ve learned.

Once you’ve got that down, the next step is doing some research. What problems are people having that you could use your current skill set to help solve? This is where picking a niche comes in handy. A niche refers to a small specialized portion of the population.

Let’s say, you’re a stay at home parent, and one of your skills is cooking healthy family meals that your kids enjoy. Your niche will likely be stay at home parents. You can then narrow down your search by checking forums and website or magazines that target stay at home parents.

“If you do what you love, it is the best way to relax.” – Christian Louboutin

What To Look For in Your Research?

Look for pain points and problems, especially those that are recurring. You may find that cooking healthy meals is not necessarily where parents are struggling, maybe it’s with purchasing healthy foods or the cost (money and time) of healthy meals. You want to look at the questions people are asking, and take note of the language they use to describe their problems. Nutritious vs. healthy. Quick vs. easy.

Finally, take note of products that offer solutions to those problems. These offer ideas to you about ways in which you can present your solution; Youtube channels, specialized cookbooks, how-to guides, online courses, etc.

By the time you’ve followed all these steps, you would have established 3 things:

  1. A monetizable skill set — You know what your skills are and how you can use them
  2. Proof of a Need — People have a problem that you can solve, and now you know who they are.
  3. A Profitable Market — If people are buying said cookbooks, or paying for products, this shows you that they are willing to put their money where their mouth is.

This is the beginning of any business. Fast Food restaurants offer quick meals on the go, Walmart puts everything in one place so people don’t have to travel to different stores, books entertain or instruct, cars transport and save time. At the heart of every product and business is a need, and you are now on your way to creating a solution that people are already looking for!

What is a business you want to start? Share your thoughts below!

Image courtesy of Twenty20.com

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