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10 Powerful Ways to Stop Feeling Overworked

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10 Powerful Ways to Stop Feeling Overworked

In this digital era, everyone feels overworked. We all are flooded with lots of information. With more information comes more ideas. With more ideas, there is an urge to implement all these ideas.

By spreading the wings in all directions, we are not able to concentrate on our main work. As a result, we are trapped under the illusion of overwork.

There are two solid reasons for calling your overwork an “illusion

  • You are the source of all your thoughts. You have the power to create a heaven or hell for yourself.
  • In order to stay away from self-guilt, we start plotting overburden stories. By focusing on these stories, we create a cursing zone in which we blame the external conditions only.
If you are feeling overworked, these 10 tips will help you to have a productive lifestyle:

 

1. Overburden decreases your productivity

Your success is not determined by the “hours of your hard work”. Your success is determined by the “productive hours of your hard work”.  More time on your tasks is not equivalent to more output.

Recharge your body by relaxing. Remember one thing: You are just a human being, not a machine. In order to bring out the creative elements, your body needs some proper rest.

“Doing nothing is better than being busy doing nothing.” – Lao Tzu

2. Know your initial point

How does it feel by looking at the pile of folders or emails waiting for you? You feel exhausted by looking at them only. Before starting the work, you frame an impossible image in your mind.

Only one question haunts you: From where to start from? While writing this post also, I devoted some time for writing the introduction. It gave me the lead to discussing different sub-heading with ease. Before starting anything, devote some quality time on your initial point for gaining focus and clarity.

 

3. Stop procrastining your small targets

When you are handed small targets, you simply twist your face (with an ease on your face) with a simple thought: Tomorrow, I will handle this small baby. And, the tomorrow never comes.

When the deadline comes near, all these small tasks pile up together to become a big beast. Now, you twist your face (with stress on your face) with a pessimistic thought: If I am overburdened by small things, how will I cope up with big tasks. Before taking a splash in the negative pool, finish your work on time without any delays.

 

4. Know your working mojo

Are you a morning or a nocturnal person? Do you feel refreshed after starting a day by meditating or by taking meditative breaks between your works? You have to recognize your magic charm for gaining your rhythm.

By understanding your fertile zones, plant the seeds of success by watering your hard work in the proper manner. In this zone, you suck all the creative juices within to give your best results. Working Mojo differs from person to person. So, you don’t need to copy anyone.

 

5. Plan your work by focusing on a single goal

Clear off all the distractions to work on your single goal. Don’t mess up the whole situation by putting your legs in different directions. At the end of the day, you are not going to find any meaning from your hard work.

A small magnifying glass is capable of burning a sheet of paper. It has the ability to “focus” the sun’s rays at one point. In a similar manner, focus all your energies on a single goal to burn out all negativity from your life.

“This one step – choosing a goal and sticking to it – changes everything.” – Scott Reed

6. Don’t bombard yourself by the cloud of over-thinking

By over-analyzing, you dig a grave for yourself. Let me explain, why? Instead of adding more bricks of optimism, you form a crack in the previously settled bricks by putting so much weight on the foundation of your thoughts.

Due to the weak foundation, your work demolishes in front of your own eyes. Before starting anything, you create a cloud of doubts. So, begin your work with a clear picture in mind.

 

7. Stop complaining and start accepting

I was not able to complete the task, due to…. (there are many reasons). Does it sound familiar? It is very easy to pass on the blame on other’s shoulders. You always have some reason to coat your shortcomings.

Accept your fault and start working on your weak points. There is no use of gaining any temporary happiness. In the long run, you can’t escape by simply playing the blame game. Have the guts to take the responsibility for your actions.

 

8. Make a proper schedule

Prioritize your work by allocating a different amount of time for every task. Firstly, finish off the most difficult task. You will feel relaxed after the completion.

Then, you can focus on other important tasks. Do not pick any random stuff. Plan daily, weekly and, monthly strategies. Analyze each strategy at the end of the day, week, and the month. Ask one thing: How much time will I take to complete this task? Then, set realistic deadlines.

 

9. Indulge in “stress-free” time

While you are surrounded with external work, spare some time for yourself. When you are not getting a way out, take a deep breath to calm down. This time is not restricted to you only.

It represents the wonderful interaction with everyone to make you forget about the busyness of life. So, interact with your family members. Play with your kids or indulge in your hobbies. Do not pollute this time with your official work.

 

10. Don’t say yes to everything

You must have heard this proverb: All work and no play make Jack a dull boy. Let us design this proverb to understand the importance of ‘no’. All ‘yeses’ and no ‘noes’ make you a dull individual. Don’t add more miseries by agreeing on every point.

You must keep your point forward and eliminate the excessive junk from your schedule. If you are finding it hard to say ‘no’ to your office colleague or friend immediately, say you’ll come back with an answer later.

 

Thank you for reading my article! I would love to hear your thoughts in the comment section below!

Yatin Khulbe is a content writer who enjoys the company of small kids. He is the founder of the personal development blog-Buddytation: Connect With Your Inner Buddy. He helps everybuddy to realize their true dreams by sharing ideas on personal growth, motivation and happiness. Join him to build a buddysphere of positive thoughts.

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The Imbalanced Problem with Work/Life Balance

Balancing is for your checkbook, gymnastics, and nutrition; not for your people’s work/life ratio.

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5 Indicators of Unresolved Attachment Trauma

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Emotional Attachment Trauma

Trauma caused during specific stages of a child’s development, known as attachment trauma, can have lasting effects on a person’s sense of safety, security, predictability, and trust. This type of trauma is often the result of abuse, neglect, or inconsistent care from a primary caregiver.

Individuals who have not fully processed attachment trauma may display similar patterns of behavior and physical or psychological symptoms that negatively impact their adult lives, including the choices they make in relationships and business.

Unfortunately, many people may not even be aware that they are struggling with trauma. Research estimates that 6% of the population will experience PTSD in their lifetime, with a majority of males and females having experienced significant trauma.

Unresolved attachment trauma can significantly impair the overall quality of a person’s life, including their ability to form healthy relationships and make positive choices for themselves. One well-known effect of unhealed attachment trauma is the compulsion to repeat past wounds by unconsciously selecting romantic partners who trigger their developmental trauma.

However, there are other less recognized but equally detrimental signs of unprocessed developmental trauma.

 

Five possible indications of unresolved attachment trauma are:

 

1.  Unconscious Sabotage

Self-sabotage is a common pattern among individuals with unprocessed attachment trauma. This cycle often begins with hurting others, which is then followed by hurting oneself. It is also common for those with attachment trauma to have heightened emotional sensitivity, which can trigger this cycle.

This pattern can manifest in lashing out, shutting down, or impulsive behavior that leads to feelings of guilt, shame, and self-loathing.

Many people with attachment trauma are not aware of their wounds and operate on survival mode, unconsciously testing or challenging the emotional investment of those around them, and pushing them away out of self-preservation and fear of abandonment.

This can lead to a pattern of making poor choices for themselves based on impulsivity.

 

2. Persistent Pain

 
Chronic pain is a common symptom that can stem from early trauma. Studies have shown a connection between physical conditions such as fibromyalgia, headaches, gastrointestinal issues, insomnia, muscle aches, back pain, chest pain, and chronic fatigue with the aftermath of chronic developmental trauma, particularly physical abuse.
 
Research has found that individuals with insecure attachment styles, such as anxious, avoidant, or disorganized, have a higher incidence of somatic symptoms and a history of physical and emotional abuse in childhood compared to those with a secure attachment style.
 
 

3. Behaviors That Block Out Trauma

 
Trauma blocking practises are used to avoid the pain and memories connected with traumatic events.
 
Emotional numbing, avoidance, and escape via briefly pleasurable activities that distract from terrible memories or suffering are common examples. Unfortunately, this escape habit stops people from successfully processing and recovering from their trauma.
 
Furthermore, when the pain resurfaces, more and more diversions are necessary to continue ignoring it. This can be seen in compulsive behaviours such as drug or alcohol addiction, emotional eating, numbing oneself through relationships, workaholism, excessive or dangerous exercise routines, compulsive internet or technology use, or any other compulsive behaviour used to distract yoursef from intrusive thoughts and emotions.
 
These actions have the potential to prolong a cycle of avoidance and repression, preventing persons from healing and progressing.
 

4. A strong need for control

 
It’s understandable that some people may struggle with control issues in their adult lives, especially if they felt helpless or vulnerable during their childhood.
 
This can happen if someone had an overbearing caregiver who didn’t let them make their own choices, expected too much from them, or didn’t take care of them properly. As adults, they might try to control everything in their life to feel more in control and less anxious or scared. This might be because they didn’t feel like they had control over their life when they were a child.
 
It’s important to remember that everyone’s experiences are different and it’s okay to seek help if you’re struggling with control issues.
 
 

5. Psychological Symptoms That Are Not Explained

 
Individuals with a history of developmental trauma may experience a range of psychological symptoms, including obsessive-compulsive behavior, intense mood swings, irritability, anger, depression, emotional numbing, or severe anxiety.
 
These symptoms can vary in intensity and may occur intermittently throughout the day. People with this type of trauma may attempt to “distract” themselves from these symptoms by denying or rationalizing them, or may resort to substance abuse or behavioral addictions as coping mechanisms. This can be a maladaptive way of trying to numb their symptoms.
 
 

What to do next if you’re suffering from emotional attachment trauma?

 
Everyone’s experience of healing from trauma is unique. It’s important to be aware of whether you have experienced childhood developmental trauma and how it may be affecting your relationships as an adult. Sometimes, the effects of trauma can be overwhelming and we may try to push them away or avoid them.
 
If you notice that you’re engaging in these behaviors, it’s important to seek help from a trauma therapist who can support you on your healing journey. Remember, you’re not alone and it’s never too late to start healing.
 

There are several ways that people can work to overcome emotional attachment trauma:

  1. Therapy: One of the most effective ways to overcome emotional attachment trauma is through therapy. A therapist can help you process your experiences, understand the impact of your trauma on your life, and develop coping strategies to manage symptoms.
  2. Support groups: Joining a support group of people who have had similar experiences can be a great way to find validation, empathy, and a sense of community.
  3. Mindfulness practices: Mindfulness practices such as meditation, pilates, prayer time with God or journaling can help you become more aware of your thoughts, emotions, and physical sensations, and develop a sense of spiritual connection and self-regulation.
  4. Trauma-focused cognitive-behavioral therapy (TF-CBT): This is a type of therapy that is specifically designed to help individuals process and recover from traumatic events.
  5. Building a safety net: Building a support system of people you trust, who are there for you when you need them, can help you feel more secure and safe in your life.

It’s important to remember that healing from emotional attachment trauma is a process and it may take time. It’s also important to find a therapist who is experienced in treating trauma, who you feel comfortable talking with, and who can help you develop a personalized treatment plan.

 
 
If you desire to work with me on healing your wounds and unlocking the aspects of you that were never realized so you can achieve more success in your life then head over to awebliss.com and join my weekly LIVE online mentorship calls.
 
 
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