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(Video) Michael Arrington – A Day In The Life Of A $10 Million Dollar A Year Blogger

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Michael Arrington
, the Owner & Founder of the 3rd biggest Technology Blog “TechCrunch.com” boasts an annual earning of $10 Million a year of Revenue from his successful tech blog through advertisements and endorsement deals. Michael Arrington is known for his no bars held style, speaking his mind wherever he goes.  Even to this day Michael Arrington contributes articles and his time to Techcrunch.com with over 5 Million Subscribers and 30 Million monthly page views.

There is no doubt Michael Arrington knows what to do and how to do it when it comes to Successful Blogging. Checkout this Video and Interview with Michael Arrington on becoming a Successful Internet Entrepreneur.

 

Interview with Mike Arrington of TechCrunch.com

 

Michael Arringtons Story

Michael Arrington I wake up in a pissed-off mood. I’m not a morning person. And I usually wake up to emergencies—an e-mail or a text message saying, “Oh, my God! Something big is happening! How could you not have written about this yet?’

If news is breaking, I want to be on it. We break more big stories than everyone else combined in tech—and that’s not prebriefed news or something that was handed to us. I judge my own performance based on that. When we break a story, that’s a point. When someone else breaks a story, we’re minus a point. And I want to be positive points.

I try to get up at 9 a.m. every day. One of the things my doctor wants me to do is regulate my sleep. A year ago, I’d work until I passed out, and wake up eight or nine hours later, which might be 4 p.m. or 3 a.m. Then I’d work again until I passed out. That was my life for four years—it got really bad. I missed a lot of social things. I didn’t keep up with friends. I was a mess. I actually gained 50 pounds in the five years since I started TechCrunch. So now I’m working with a doctor and trying to get reset. Getting up at the same time every day is apparently one of the best things you can do health-wise. The problem is, I still don’t go to sleep very early. So I’m usually working on four or five hours of sleep. Then I make it up on the weekends.

The very first thing I do in the morning is go right to my computer, which is always on. I’ll scan my e-mail for breaking news. If something big is going on, I’ll decide if I want to cover the story or assign it to another writer. Say a source sends me a tip that Google is buying Microsoft, and it’s going to break later today—I’m making this up, but that would be a big story. I’d start calling people at Google and Microsoft to see if it’s true or not.

Sometimes, it will be true, but the company will ask me to hold off. Negotiating with companies over how news breaks is a big part of what we do. I don’t think traditional journalists would do this or admit to it, but a source might say, “Yeah, we just got bought, but can you please not write about it for a week, because it might kill the deal?’ Unless I know lots of other journalists are sniffing around, I generally defer to the entrepreneur. We probably lose half of those stories, but it’s the right thing to do. It builds trust. People aren’t going to tell you things if they don’t trust you.

Usually around 11 a.m., after I have put out all the fires and there’s nothing left in my inbox that I have to address immediately, I’ll take a shower, get dressed, and walk my dogs. I have a chocolate and a yellow lab, and they’re my best friends.

I moved to the Seattle area in May. It’s calm, and my parents live nearby, so I see them a few times each week. I spend two-thirds of the time working here, and the rest of the time in our office in San Francisco. Right now, I don’t actually have a place in California, so I stay in hotels.

After my dogs are fed, I make myself something to eat and go back to my desk. My office is like a cave. I have blackout shades on the windows. I like the dark. There’s less distraction. I use a Mac with two 24-inch monitors, and I’ll do research on one screen and write on the other. It’s more efficient. I’d love to have three monitors, but Macs support only two. I have the exact same setup in my office in San Francisco.

 

I usually spend about half my day talking to sources, either on the phone or on IM. There are very few people in Silicon Valley—or in tech, in general—whom I don’t know pretty well. Chasing down stories is my favorite part of my job. My style is to bust the door down and clean the mess up later. That works pretty well for me. I’ve known a lot of my sources for five years now. When I call them, there’s no salutation—it’s just right to the point. I expect them to tell me what I want to know very quickly.

Our main competitive advantage is that my team and I truly love entrepreneurs. They’re my rock stars. I’ve always been fascinated by entrepreneurs. I had four businesses that did not work out. TechCrunch is my first real success, and it happened by accident. If I were to write a book, it would be about what drives entrepreneurs. I meet the winners, and the losers, too. Most of them could go out and get a perfectly reasonable job as an accountant or a lawyer. Instead, they risk everything for almost certain failure. The losers are actually more interesting sometimes. You learn a ton from failure.

I never develop friendships with people I don’t actually like. For instance, I write about digital music a lot. And the music labels are notorious for working the press. They’ll leak stuff and develop relationships, and it can actually be pretty fruitful as a journalist to get to know them. I hate ’em. They sue their customers. I see them as Darth Vader. Maybe it’s not fair, but I see the world in black and white. I don’t like them, so I won’t talk to them. My sources are all people I actually genuinely like, and I think they know that. They’re my friends, too.

I’m pretty unorganized when it comes to keeping track of my sources. I used to keep most of them sorted in my head. But then at some point in the past year, I suddenly lost my short-term memory. I don’t know if it’s just turning 40. One way I stay organized now is by using Google Voice. It keeps a record of all of my phone calls and text messages. When I make a call, I’ll almost always initiate it from my computer through this service. And if somebody calls my Google Voice number, it will ring my cell phone or my home phone—any phone I want. It also makes it easy to set up cell phones when I travel to Europe or Asia.

Text messages and phone calls tend to be the sort of cloak-and-dagger way I get tips and story ideas, but I also use Skype a lot. The video quality is great. When you go full screen, it’s like the other person is in the room. Skype also has screen sharing, so the person can hit a button and I can see their desktop. I use it a lot for business, and more and more for talking with friends.

I don’t like PR people for the most part. I like going to CEOs directly. If a PR person suggests I meet the CEO of this new company, I always say yes. But if they say, “Can we set up drinks? Or dinner?’ I say no. I hate that—it is a huge waste of time. Let’s meet over coffee or get on Skype video and talk about your company, but I don’t want to chitchat about your family, because I don’t know you. If I have time to go to dinner, I want to do that with my college friends or my parents or whomever I’m dating.

I usually post several times a week. When I first started TechCrunch, I would post several times a day. I’ve always been manic about it. You know that experiment where the rat hits the lever and the treat comes out? By the third day of writing, I got my first comment from somebody who wasn’t my mom. That’s the treat. Then people started subscribing to my RSS feed. Every day, that number would go up—10, 13, 100. That constant feedback is my reward. I still scan for comments on my posts. I can almost always predict how many comments I’ll get. Most are knee-jerk reactions, but sometimes there will be a few that are worthy of discussion, and I’ll chime in.

TechCrunch is known for our parties. That’s how I met all my sources in the early days. These days, we do three big blowouts every year, five or six smaller events, and then a few small parties. It winds up being an event every month, and I try to go to all of them. I started the tradition when I first moved to Palo Alto in 2005. I wrote a blog post inviting people to a party—10 people came. I made hamburgers. We drank beer and stayed up until 4 a.m. drinking Scotch by the fire. Two weeks later, I had another party, and 20 people showed up. About 100 people came to the next one, then 200. Venture capitalists were smoking pot in my backyard and passing out on my couch. I stopped having parties at my house, because it was getting trashed. About 1,000 people came to our party this summer.

Over the years, some people got upset when we didn’t cover them, and a certain percentage of those really made it personal. Or I’d write about how much I liked a start-up—or didn’t like a start-up—and people would get really passionate about that. Suddenly, there were people who really didn’t like me. And because I’m introverted—I like being alone—that actually made me pull in a little bit, and then more and more. The more I pulled in and stopped talking to people, the more people saw me maybe as arrogant.

So suddenly, I have all these enemies. In 2008, somebody spit on me at a conference in Germany. Before that, I had a death-threat incident—I had to hire private security 24/7 to protect me and my parents. We closed our office, and one of our employees got detained by police when he stopped by to check on things. Obviously, we sorted that out, but the whole experience freaked me out. I took off. I went to Hawaii for a month and didn’t bring my computer. Page views went up; everything was fine. That helped me realize that I am not nearly as important as I thought I was—and that the team I hired is really good. I’ve really let go since then. Now I really rely on them, and it’s really good.

I have never been very good at managing. I want to be writing, and it’s hard to be a coach and a player at the same time. Plus, I’m moody. That’s why I hired Heather Harde as CEO. She is steady. Erick Schonfeld, who is co-editor of TechCrunch, manages the editorial team. I talk with each of them maybe three times a week. We have never had an executive meeting. Instead, we use this program called Yammer to make sure everyone at TechCrunch is on the same page. It’s like a streaming bulletin board—anyone can post, and everyone will see it. If I think a writer or editor did a great job, I’ll give them a public high-five. Or if someone screwed up the formatting, I may point it out so others can learn from those mistakes.

Around 3 p.m., I usually take a break. I run errands or play fetch with my dogs. This summer, since I’d just moved, I did a lot of household things—like unpacking or buying a shower rod. Depending on my plans, I may go out to dinner with my friends or my parents. Or I’ll eat alone and then go back to work. Honestly, my goal these days is fitting real life in around the work.

After dinner, I’m usually back at the computer. That’s when I do thought and opinion pieces. I’ll spend two or three hours on one post. For example, in July, a CNN journalist was fired for tweeting her opinion about a Hezbollah leader. I wrote a piece about how ridiculous it was that she could not have an opinion.

I like working late at night. There are no interruptions. I usually listen to music when I write. I like hard music that is not happy music—Metallica, Eminem, Rage Against the Machine.

I might go until midnight or 6 in the morning. No matter what time it is, I always read before I go to bed—even if it is only a few pages. Usually fiction and always an actual printed book. My favorite book is Catch-22. And then I fall asleep, happy.

Michael Arrington Interview By: Inc.com

 

I am the the Founder of Addicted2Success.com and I am so grateful you're here to be part of this awesome community. I love connecting with people who have a passion for Entrepreneurship, Self Development & Achieving Success. I started this website with the intention of educating and inspiring likeminded people to always strive for success no matter what their circumstances. I'm proud to say through my podcast and through this website we have impacted over 60 million lives in the last 4 and a half years.

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3 Comments

3 Comments

  1. 藍俊嵩

    Jul 4, 2011 at 6:14 am

    I usually don’t post in Blogs but your blog forced me to, amazing work.. beautiful …

  2. Ella

    Jun 27, 2011 at 7:12 pm

    I like your website artwork. I can’t master Fireworks at all.

  3. simon powernerd

    Jun 24, 2011 at 9:51 am

    Oh man This guy is the dick balls and the asshole of the online world, i respect him yet loath him, much success to him but hes burnt far too many bridges to uphold the respect anyone in his position deserves. this site is dope, good to see they promote people from the good and bad and still keep it relevant to success. thankyou

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Interviews

The Questions You Have Always Wanted To Ask A Spiritual Leader

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buddhist_boot_camp, timber hawk eye interview

It’s not often we get to sit on the floor, barefoot and in lotus position while interviewing a spiritual author whose journey and teachings have positively influenced the lives of hundreds of thousands of people.

10995998_10204532948777710_3703269667569988_nTimber Hawkeye, author of the best-selling spiritual guide ‘Buddhist Boot Camp’ offers a non-sectarian approach to being at peace with the world, both within and around us. His intention in ‘Buddhist Boot Camp’ and life is to awaken, enlighten, enrich and inspire.

Timber was kind enough to give us his time on his worldwide book tour to answer some of the questions not many get to ask him but all want to know.

Make yourself a cup of tea, light a few candles and enjoy!

 

1. What is the message behind Buddhist Boot Camp?

“If I was to incapsulate it, the message would be simple – be grateful and be kind. It’s important to understand that we create a lot of our own suffering – by becoming aware that we hold the responsibility to create our own happiness, we empower ourselves to live a more relaxed, compassionate and positive life.”

 

2. How did the book come to be?

“I never had the intention to sit down and write a book. When I moved to Hawaii, I didn’t have a place to live, I didn’t have a job lined up and I didn’t know what I was going to do – I just knew that I wanted to live a more relaxed and free life. Every month I would send a letter to my friends and family, updating them on how my simplistic and non materialistic life was turning out.

After about 8 years of continual updates, thoughts and teachings, my friend who was moved by what I wrote about, suggested that I take all those emails and letters and make them public. So that’s what ‘Buddhist Boot Camp’ is – a collection of all my journal entires, emails and letters to friends compiled into a book. That’s why every chapter is only a page long and can be read in any order.”

 

3. Is there a difference between being religious and being spiritual?

Absolutely! Organized religion provides answers for us to follow while spirituality keeps us in a place of questioning and inquiry. With spirituality we make peace with not knowing, with not having all the answers and not having only one truth. Truth within spirituality has a small ’T’ while in religion, it’s capitalized on being the universal truth above all else.

That’s why there is so much hostility between different religions – they believe their truth is the only truth and most superior to any other explanation. While spirituality leaves us in a place of searching, wonder, open mindfulness and open heartfulness to not be so quick to judge or label.”

Buddha-Quote-Becoming-Yourself

 

4. You quote the Dalai Lama saying, “Don’t try to use what you learn from Buddhism to be a Buddhist; use it to be a better whatever-you-already-are.” Can you elaborate on that?

“I don’t think a label is important at all. I am a lot of things – not only one (label) defines me. Meaning it’s not about being a buddhist, it’s about being ‘Buddha-like’ or not being Christian but being ‘Christ-like’ and that’s a really important invitation to not focus so much on the label but on the actual teachings. Living this way makes you ask yourself ‘how can my actions be inline with my values?’ because your beliefs don’t make you a better person, your behavior does. So it does matter who you are or what you want to be just be really good at it.”

 

4. You say to focus on the teachings not the teachers. What do you mean and why?

“We tend to put the ‘teachers’ of faith up on a pedestal and look up to them. Shunryū Suzuki wrote about how there are no enlightened beings, only enlightened activity and that was very empowering for me. The people we perceive to be enlightened i.e. the Dalai Lama, Jesus, Buddha, they’re people like you and I however they just made enlightened activity apart of their everyday lives.

And so by bringing ourselves up to eye level with those figures, you become empowered and confident in your abilities to become enlightened.”

 

5. Do you believe success and spirituality coexist? Typically society tells us we can only develop one or the other.

Most definitely! You need to understand that ‘typically’ the opinion of success in society is skewed. Success to me is being happy. To me spirituality is a means to happiness and so success and spirituality can very much coexist. I don’t have a lot of money however I feel like the richest man in the world because I am happy – and spirituality brings that to me. I think there would be nothing worse than being super wealthy but feeling unfulfilled and unhappy internally.”

what-we-think-we-become-buddha-quote

 

6. Meditation seems to be a buzz word lately, what is it, how do you do it and can someone with no previous experience with meditation still benefit?

Of course! You’re right, meditation is a buzz word at the moment which is a shame because with that brings assumptions – assumptions of how it should be done, what it is and who should do it. People seek out to be ‘taught’ meditation however I shy away from giving instruction because the moment you do, you’re implying there is a wrong way to meditate. I have a lot of individuals come up to me and voice that they are meditating wrong or they don’t know how to do it but in-fact there is no ‘wrong way’ of meditating. As long as the intention is there, your attempts are successful.

The whole point of meditation is to learn how to control your mind. So if you find that there is something you do which relaxes you and in which your mind doesn’t wonder – it could be jogging, hiking, gardening, doing puzzles, painting and if while you’re doing that your mind stays focused – you’re meditating. Its that simple. There’s no need to sit in full lotus position or burn incense or chant chakras – mediation is just the practice of focusing your mind.”

 

7. What’s one exercise or activity you would recommend we do starting today to lead a more positive, happy and fulfilled life?

“Keep a gratitude journal. Every single morning, make it the first thing you do – take out your journal and just start listing anything and everything you’re grateful for.  It can be as simple as “I am so grateful to be alive today” or “I am so grateful for all my friends and family” or “I am so grateful for all the opportunities I attract into my life”.

You can even download a gratitude app to your smart phone if journaling isn’t for you. What’s cool about the app is you can also document photos, videos and voice memos as well as text.

When you live and come from a place of complete gratitude, everything changes and you have no choice but to become a happier person.”

 

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Interviews

(Video) Gary Vaynerchuk’s Unforgettable Advice For Achieving Success

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Gary Vaynerchuk VaynerMedia

We recently caught up with the multi-millionaire entrepreneur Gary Vaynerchuk for an exclusive, one of a kind interview. Gary is an entrepreneurial wizard, with unforgettable advice for all with a humble yet electric personality and charm.

Gary was able to build his family wine business from 3 Million to 60 Million in a matter of years using creative and innovative marketing techniques, on and offline. His company “VaynerMedia” are the brains and promotional orchestrators behind some of America’s largest companies and personalities.

Gary Vaynerchuk is a world-renowned expert in Social Media and is the author of a number of New York Times best-selling books including “Crush It!“, and “The Thank You Economy“. He and is set for a third book on the way with his soon to be released, and highly anticipated “Jab, Jab, Jab, Right Hook: How to Tell Your Story in a Noisy Social World“.

 

Gary Vaynerchuk’s Unforgettable Advice For Achieving Success

 

Great Gary Vaynerchuk Quotes

“We’re not really good at knowing what we want, and we are very quick to say “this sucks”. That’s where the opportunity lies.” – Gary Vaynerchuk

“You didn’t grow up driving…you figured it out.” – Gary Vaynerchuk

Embrace what you’re good at. Lebron didn’t try to become a professor. – Gary Vaynerchuk

“Legacy is greater than currency.” – Gary Vaynerchuk

“If you live for weekends or vacations, your shit is broken.” – Gary Vaynerchuk

“We only get to play this game one time…one life.” – Gary Vaynerchuk

“In 2006, the Blockbuster board got together and said, ‘Do you know anyone using Netflix.’ …Look how that worked out. That is what happens when you put ten 80-year-old guys in a room…Be on record. Be on the right side of history. You don’t want to be the person that supported the Blockbuster decision.” – Gary Vaynerchuk

“There’s no reason in 2013, to do shit you hate. NONE.” – Gary Vaynerchuk

“A penguin cannot become a giraffe, so just be the best penguin you can be.” – Gary Vaynerchuk

 

Gary Vaynerchuk Entrepreneur Picture Quote For Success

 

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Interviews

Captain America “Chris Evans” Shares His Advice For Success and Acting

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Chris Evans, the actor of Captain America recently appeared on Spreecast for a live Q&A with his fans and had an awesome amount of positive energy and inspirational advice to share with his followers.

We transcribed Chis Evans great answers and advice just for you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chris Evans Inspirational Answers To Living A Successful Life

 

What’s it like being part of something so big like “The Avengers”?

Intimidating, a little overwhelming but you are overwhelmed with gratitude. When you are making it, you don’t really know it’s going to be that big, even when it comes out you forget what’s really happening.

I try to think about what I would have thought when I was 18 before I started this career and I think it would be radically different, but overtime, the more movies you make you just get used to the routine of the movies coming out, you’re in the mall, you’re in the press, you’re trying to get another job and it all becomes this piece in the puzzle of work.

I think you become a little de-sensitized; you’re like “Great! That did well, Good Job!”. You are still grateful but you’re not just sitting there like “WOW!, Look at this!, Look what I was a part of”, it doesn’t always feel that way, which is a shame, because it should and I think that’s part of what I try to remind myself of, to be appreciative.

Gratitude is the key to happiness, if you have a healthy understanding of gratitude, you can’t lose. – Chris Evans

 

What’s your favorite part of being Captain America?

chris evans captain america actorI really like playing a good super hero. Not that the other super heroes are bad, but a lot of other super heroes are tortured souls, they have demons that they’re fighting. Caps just a really good guy, apart from being a super hero and having super powers, he’s just a really good man.

Any role that you play, if you are in a head space for an extended period of time, you really have to think a certain type of way and get inside the head of a character and sometimes I play dark characters or frustrated characters and it’s negative because you are trying to tap into the parts of you that can connect to that, the parts of you from your own personal history and experience that you can identify and relate to, you have to find pieces of you that are in common.

So while playing Captain America on a daily basis, you are trying to tap into the best part of yourself, and it’s Inspiring, you want to do better, you want to do good, it’s a healthy head space to be in and I think it’s rewarding playing someone with such a good heart.

 

How do you stay true to your self without letting the fame get to your head?

I go home a lot, back to Boston. LA is a tricky place to be, and it’s not just fame that’s the thing. Whether you are famous or not you are in a business of rejection, competition, comparison and you live in your own head quite a bit, which is not a good place for anyone to be for an extended period of time.

When you are back at home, you remember your youth, you are surrounded by friends and family who don’t care if you are successful in this industry or not and your priorities shift and all of a sudden the things that truly matter, start to come back to life.

 

Do you have a quote song lyric or saying that inspires you?

I really like Eckhart Tolle, he wrote the book “The Power of Now”. I am a big fan of Buddhism, Eastern Philosophy, the notion of trying to be present in the moment, turning the third eye off and detaching from ego

Eckhart has a quote from his book called “Stillness Speaks” that just really resonated with me, enough to permanently ink my body, and it says:

“When you lose touch with your inner stillness, you lose touch with yourself, when you lose touch with yourself, you lose yourself in the world.”

And it just made so much sense to me, still does, always will. It’s something that always brings me back to being centered.

 

What book are you currently reading?

Chris-Evans-actor-captain americaIt’s a book called “The Honeymoon Effect”, by an author called Bruce Lipton, who wrote a book called “The Biology of Belief” and it’s a really clever book. It’s about how for the longest time scientists thought that your DNA was determined by your genetics and how this one guy is proving that your DNA can be affected by your thought, your emotions, your daily choices, how you interact with the world through your thinking and that it can actually change your chemistry.

So this guy wrote a book called “The Honeymoon Effect” and it’s about how we can sustain healthy relationships in our life. Not just with men and women but with all of our relations and all of our interactions throughout our life. I just love his writing.

 

Did anyone influence you to get into acting?

My older sister.

When I was younger I didn’t act in my first play until I was in 6th or 7th grade. I saw my older sister doing it and she was having a ball. We would go and see her after her plays and my parents would give her candy, and I was like “Well I want candy”. She does plays, everyone’s having a good time, she’s staying out school nights and it all sounded great. So I did a couple of plays with her at a place where she did theatre and that was it, I was hooked!

 

Are you still nervous when going up for auditions? If yes, how do you get over the nerves and perform the best you can?

Yes, I’m still nervous in auditions, but it’s a little bit easier now because with age you are able to recognize that “this isn’t everything”, “this isn’t the end of the world”, I think when you’re young you put so much importance on everything.

As you get older you realize that you will be fine and that this will not somehow stop you from being happy and that’s the goal in life, I think that everyone’s goal is to be happy. – Chris Evans

 

Top three movies you would recommend anyone watch and why?

chris-evans-capLegends of the Fall – It’s a beautiful sweeping epic about brothers, honor, war and responsibility. It’s just a fantastic movie.

I Heart Huckabees – It’s a little bit of a confusing film but I think it’s really brilliant. It’s so intelligent and so well done. There is a documentary called “What The Bleep Do We Know”, and it’s all about your chemical make up and how you can manifest your own day, and I almost feel like “I Heart Huckabees” is the fiction version of that film.

Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind – I like the message, I love the film making, and the actors are phenomenal. It’s one of those movies that is constantly entertaining.

 

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Interviews

This 16 Year Old App Creator Scored Funding From A Hong Kong Billionaire

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nick daloisio-summly-app


While studying at his parents house in London, Nick D’Aloisio came up with a brilliant idea to create a revolutionary app by the name of Summly which changes the way that you read your favorite websites and social media feeds. This idea scored this 16 year-old genius a flight to New York and some serious money in the bank as a result of an official partnership with the eleventh wealthiest billionaire in the world, Li Ka-Shing who will be overlooking the production and release of this app.

Read on to see how Nick D’Aloisio was able to achieve such a great feat at the fresh young age of 16.

Many young entrepreneurs say they want to create the next Facebook, 16-year-old Nick D’Aloisio wants to solve the problem social networks have created in the first place.

The teenager built an iPhone app called Summly, which automatically generates summaries in the form of bullet points to help you filter through all that information.

With more than $250,000 in seed funding from Hong Kong billionaire businessman Li Ka-shing, D’Aloisio spent the last six months in his parents’ London house building Summly.

It was Sunday at 4 a.m. London time when D’Aloisio enthusiastically IMed me over AOL Messenger to make sure the news of his app made it to my Twitter stream. He was excited that 23,000 people have downloaded the app since it launched last week.

D’Aloisio was inspired to build the app after he signed up for Twitter, and got a flood of information from AP, Reuters, and other people’s Twitter handles.

Interested in finding out more about D’Aloisio, we called him to ask him about this machine learning technology and how he balances his startup with school work. We could hear his faint Australian accent — he’s originally from Perth, Western Australia, (wow, this is where Joel Brown from Addicted2Success.com is from 😉

 

Nick D’Aloisio – The Boy Genius Of Summly

 

Interview With Nick D’Aloisio

Boonsri Dickinson: How do you see the future of search and the Internet?

Nick D’Aloisio:  Consumers want information instantaneously and the search interface needs to accommodate this.

We don’t need more social networks. The new wave of technology will now stop encouraging content creation. Twitter and Facebook is enough…we have too much information. We need to try to filter the content and make it more digestible. Zite and Flipboard attempt to provide the user with the content.

We want people to use Summly once they have found content they are interested in or know what they are searching for.

BD: So how did the app evolve into what it is today?

Nick: Six months ago, we released something called Trimit. It was about content creation. It was a more gimmicky app, where you’d input an article and summarize to 140 characters for Twitter or other restrictions for Tumblr, Facebook, and email. But I found that people were using for consuming content.

Trimit taught me people want content consumption tools not content creation. Now with Summly, you can have a computer to aid that process.

BD: What’s the market for it?

Nick: It’s Cliff Notes for a mobile device. It takes a second to return any search result.

It’s a bit magical. People don’t believe what it can do, then they have a “wow” moment. You can share the summary. You can quickly evaluate the content now.

In the future, it can be applied to email. It’s easy to train it for colloquial language used in email. And eventually it can be used in other areas such as enterprise, consumer markets, and education. We will probably license the technology though monthly fees.

BD: How did you learn to program at age 12?

Nick: Books. C For Dummies. Online Tutorials. Trial and Error.

The first app I built was called Facemood when I was 14. It automatically deduced the mood of a Facebook friend using their latest Facebook status.

Even now, I’m not that confident. As I said I prefer the graphical/product aspect.

BD: What do your classmates think of you?

ND: I’m in year 11 here. I just turned 16 in November.  I hope they just think I’m a nice guy. You wouldn’t know I do this stuff. I’m really happy with the response I’ve been getting. People are amazed.

With all that, I don’t feel like I need to change my life in any way. I play sport — rugby and cricket. And I go out.

I work on the app when I can from like 9-11 pm. And on Sundays. Between school work. It’s pretty hectic.

BD: Who inspires you?

ND: Anyone who is crazy enough to create what’s in their mind. Steve Jobs for his obsession with attention to detail and his advice on failure and success. I’m inspired by designers and typography designers. And innovators like Sergey Brin and Larry Page, the founders of Google, and Jack Dorsey and the other founders of Twitter.

BD: What’s next for you?

ND: I still have three years left of schooling and plan to continue with my education into university, where I hope to study a combination of philosophy and economics, and perhaps continue learning Mandarin. I learn Mandarin because I’m interested in Chinese culture and enjoy languages.

 

Now, check out more about the app in this video:

Introduction Of Summly

 

Interview By Boonsri Dickinson from BusinessInsider.com

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Life

4 Steps to Take Right Now to Snap Out of Your Funk

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How to get out of a funk

Maybe you’re spending sleepless nights tossing and turning in bed, or perhaps you’re sleeping in until noon. Maybe all you hear are the sad songs, and all you think of are the terrible things that are happening. (more…)

Edwin S. Soriano, Executive Life Coach, Trainer, Author of "You Can Be Happy Again" book. Over the past ten years, I've helped thousands of people create positive change,  permanent transformations in their life. We do this through life coaching, training, books and online content. I help CEOs, Entrepreneurs and business leaders develop their people as a key strategy for growing their business. Learn more at www.edwinsoriano.com and www.winningcoaching.net .

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3 Comments

  1. 藍俊嵩

    Jul 4, 2011 at 6:14 am

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  2. Ella

    Jun 27, 2011 at 7:12 pm

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Interviews

The Questions You Have Always Wanted To Ask A Spiritual Leader

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buddhist_boot_camp, timber hawk eye interview

It’s not often we get to sit on the floor, barefoot and in lotus position while interviewing a spiritual author whose journey and teachings have positively influenced the lives of hundreds of thousands of people.

10995998_10204532948777710_3703269667569988_nTimber Hawkeye, author of the best-selling spiritual guide ‘Buddhist Boot Camp’ offers a non-sectarian approach to being at peace with the world, both within and around us. His intention in ‘Buddhist Boot Camp’ and life is to awaken, enlighten, enrich and inspire.

Timber was kind enough to give us his time on his worldwide book tour to answer some of the questions not many get to ask him but all want to know.

Make yourself a cup of tea, light a few candles and enjoy!

 

1. What is the message behind Buddhist Boot Camp?

“If I was to incapsulate it, the message would be simple – be grateful and be kind. It’s important to understand that we create a lot of our own suffering – by becoming aware that we hold the responsibility to create our own happiness, we empower ourselves to live a more relaxed, compassionate and positive life.”

 

2. How did the book come to be?

“I never had the intention to sit down and write a book. When I moved to Hawaii, I didn’t have a place to live, I didn’t have a job lined up and I didn’t know what I was going to do – I just knew that I wanted to live a more relaxed and free life. Every month I would send a letter to my friends and family, updating them on how my simplistic and non materialistic life was turning out.

After about 8 years of continual updates, thoughts and teachings, my friend who was moved by what I wrote about, suggested that I take all those emails and letters and make them public. So that’s what ‘Buddhist Boot Camp’ is – a collection of all my journal entires, emails and letters to friends compiled into a book. That’s why every chapter is only a page long and can be read in any order.”

 

3. Is there a difference between being religious and being spiritual?

Absolutely! Organized religion provides answers for us to follow while spirituality keeps us in a place of questioning and inquiry. With spirituality we make peace with not knowing, with not having all the answers and not having only one truth. Truth within spirituality has a small ’T’ while in religion, it’s capitalized on being the universal truth above all else.

That’s why there is so much hostility between different religions – they believe their truth is the only truth and most superior to any other explanation. While spirituality leaves us in a place of searching, wonder, open mindfulness and open heartfulness to not be so quick to judge or label.”

Buddha-Quote-Becoming-Yourself

 

4. You quote the Dalai Lama saying, “Don’t try to use what you learn from Buddhism to be a Buddhist; use it to be a better whatever-you-already-are.” Can you elaborate on that?

“I don’t think a label is important at all. I am a lot of things – not only one (label) defines me. Meaning it’s not about being a buddhist, it’s about being ‘Buddha-like’ or not being Christian but being ‘Christ-like’ and that’s a really important invitation to not focus so much on the label but on the actual teachings. Living this way makes you ask yourself ‘how can my actions be inline with my values?’ because your beliefs don’t make you a better person, your behavior does. So it does matter who you are or what you want to be just be really good at it.”

 

4. You say to focus on the teachings not the teachers. What do you mean and why?

“We tend to put the ‘teachers’ of faith up on a pedestal and look up to them. Shunryū Suzuki wrote about how there are no enlightened beings, only enlightened activity and that was very empowering for me. The people we perceive to be enlightened i.e. the Dalai Lama, Jesus, Buddha, they’re people like you and I however they just made enlightened activity apart of their everyday lives.

And so by bringing ourselves up to eye level with those figures, you become empowered and confident in your abilities to become enlightened.”

 

5. Do you believe success and spirituality coexist? Typically society tells us we can only develop one or the other.

Most definitely! You need to understand that ‘typically’ the opinion of success in society is skewed. Success to me is being happy. To me spirituality is a means to happiness and so success and spirituality can very much coexist. I don’t have a lot of money however I feel like the richest man in the world because I am happy – and spirituality brings that to me. I think there would be nothing worse than being super wealthy but feeling unfulfilled and unhappy internally.”

what-we-think-we-become-buddha-quote

 

6. Meditation seems to be a buzz word lately, what is it, how do you do it and can someone with no previous experience with meditation still benefit?

Of course! You’re right, meditation is a buzz word at the moment which is a shame because with that brings assumptions – assumptions of how it should be done, what it is and who should do it. People seek out to be ‘taught’ meditation however I shy away from giving instruction because the moment you do, you’re implying there is a wrong way to meditate. I have a lot of individuals come up to me and voice that they are meditating wrong or they don’t know how to do it but in-fact there is no ‘wrong way’ of meditating. As long as the intention is there, your attempts are successful.

The whole point of meditation is to learn how to control your mind. So if you find that there is something you do which relaxes you and in which your mind doesn’t wonder – it could be jogging, hiking, gardening, doing puzzles, painting and if while you’re doing that your mind stays focused – you’re meditating. Its that simple. There’s no need to sit in full lotus position or burn incense or chant chakras – mediation is just the practice of focusing your mind.”

 

7. What’s one exercise or activity you would recommend we do starting today to lead a more positive, happy and fulfilled life?

“Keep a gratitude journal. Every single morning, make it the first thing you do – take out your journal and just start listing anything and everything you’re grateful for.  It can be as simple as “I am so grateful to be alive today” or “I am so grateful for all my friends and family” or “I am so grateful for all the opportunities I attract into my life”.

You can even download a gratitude app to your smart phone if journaling isn’t for you. What’s cool about the app is you can also document photos, videos and voice memos as well as text.

When you live and come from a place of complete gratitude, everything changes and you have no choice but to become a happier person.”

 

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Interviews

(Video) Gary Vaynerchuk’s Unforgettable Advice For Achieving Success

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Gary Vaynerchuk VaynerMedia

We recently caught up with the multi-millionaire entrepreneur Gary Vaynerchuk for an exclusive, one of a kind interview. Gary is an entrepreneurial wizard, with unforgettable advice for all with a humble yet electric personality and charm.

Gary was able to build his family wine business from 3 Million to 60 Million in a matter of years using creative and innovative marketing techniques, on and offline. His company “VaynerMedia” are the brains and promotional orchestrators behind some of America’s largest companies and personalities.

Gary Vaynerchuk is a world-renowned expert in Social Media and is the author of a number of New York Times best-selling books including “Crush It!“, and “The Thank You Economy“. He and is set for a third book on the way with his soon to be released, and highly anticipated “Jab, Jab, Jab, Right Hook: How to Tell Your Story in a Noisy Social World“.

 

Gary Vaynerchuk’s Unforgettable Advice For Achieving Success

 

Great Gary Vaynerchuk Quotes

“We’re not really good at knowing what we want, and we are very quick to say “this sucks”. That’s where the opportunity lies.” – Gary Vaynerchuk

“You didn’t grow up driving…you figured it out.” – Gary Vaynerchuk

Embrace what you’re good at. Lebron didn’t try to become a professor. – Gary Vaynerchuk

“Legacy is greater than currency.” – Gary Vaynerchuk

“If you live for weekends or vacations, your shit is broken.” – Gary Vaynerchuk

“We only get to play this game one time…one life.” – Gary Vaynerchuk

“In 2006, the Blockbuster board got together and said, ‘Do you know anyone using Netflix.’ …Look how that worked out. That is what happens when you put ten 80-year-old guys in a room…Be on record. Be on the right side of history. You don’t want to be the person that supported the Blockbuster decision.” – Gary Vaynerchuk

“There’s no reason in 2013, to do shit you hate. NONE.” – Gary Vaynerchuk

“A penguin cannot become a giraffe, so just be the best penguin you can be.” – Gary Vaynerchuk

 

Gary Vaynerchuk Entrepreneur Picture Quote For Success

 

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Interviews

Captain America “Chris Evans” Shares His Advice For Success and Acting

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Chris Evans, the actor of Captain America recently appeared on Spreecast for a live Q&A with his fans and had an awesome amount of positive energy and inspirational advice to share with his followers.

We transcribed Chis Evans great answers and advice just for you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chris Evans Inspirational Answers To Living A Successful Life

 

What’s it like being part of something so big like “The Avengers”?

Intimidating, a little overwhelming but you are overwhelmed with gratitude. When you are making it, you don’t really know it’s going to be that big, even when it comes out you forget what’s really happening.

I try to think about what I would have thought when I was 18 before I started this career and I think it would be radically different, but overtime, the more movies you make you just get used to the routine of the movies coming out, you’re in the mall, you’re in the press, you’re trying to get another job and it all becomes this piece in the puzzle of work.

I think you become a little de-sensitized; you’re like “Great! That did well, Good Job!”. You are still grateful but you’re not just sitting there like “WOW!, Look at this!, Look what I was a part of”, it doesn’t always feel that way, which is a shame, because it should and I think that’s part of what I try to remind myself of, to be appreciative.

Gratitude is the key to happiness, if you have a healthy understanding of gratitude, you can’t lose. – Chris Evans

 

What’s your favorite part of being Captain America?

chris evans captain america actorI really like playing a good super hero. Not that the other super heroes are bad, but a lot of other super heroes are tortured souls, they have demons that they’re fighting. Caps just a really good guy, apart from being a super hero and having super powers, he’s just a really good man.

Any role that you play, if you are in a head space for an extended period of time, you really have to think a certain type of way and get inside the head of a character and sometimes I play dark characters or frustrated characters and it’s negative because you are trying to tap into the parts of you that can connect to that, the parts of you from your own personal history and experience that you can identify and relate to, you have to find pieces of you that are in common.

So while playing Captain America on a daily basis, you are trying to tap into the best part of yourself, and it’s Inspiring, you want to do better, you want to do good, it’s a healthy head space to be in and I think it’s rewarding playing someone with such a good heart.

 

How do you stay true to your self without letting the fame get to your head?

I go home a lot, back to Boston. LA is a tricky place to be, and it’s not just fame that’s the thing. Whether you are famous or not you are in a business of rejection, competition, comparison and you live in your own head quite a bit, which is not a good place for anyone to be for an extended period of time.

When you are back at home, you remember your youth, you are surrounded by friends and family who don’t care if you are successful in this industry or not and your priorities shift and all of a sudden the things that truly matter, start to come back to life.

 

Do you have a quote song lyric or saying that inspires you?

I really like Eckhart Tolle, he wrote the book “The Power of Now”. I am a big fan of Buddhism, Eastern Philosophy, the notion of trying to be present in the moment, turning the third eye off and detaching from ego

Eckhart has a quote from his book called “Stillness Speaks” that just really resonated with me, enough to permanently ink my body, and it says:

“When you lose touch with your inner stillness, you lose touch with yourself, when you lose touch with yourself, you lose yourself in the world.”

And it just made so much sense to me, still does, always will. It’s something that always brings me back to being centered.

 

What book are you currently reading?

Chris-Evans-actor-captain americaIt’s a book called “The Honeymoon Effect”, by an author called Bruce Lipton, who wrote a book called “The Biology of Belief” and it’s a really clever book. It’s about how for the longest time scientists thought that your DNA was determined by your genetics and how this one guy is proving that your DNA can be affected by your thought, your emotions, your daily choices, how you interact with the world through your thinking and that it can actually change your chemistry.

So this guy wrote a book called “The Honeymoon Effect” and it’s about how we can sustain healthy relationships in our life. Not just with men and women but with all of our relations and all of our interactions throughout our life. I just love his writing.

 

Did anyone influence you to get into acting?

My older sister.

When I was younger I didn’t act in my first play until I was in 6th or 7th grade. I saw my older sister doing it and she was having a ball. We would go and see her after her plays and my parents would give her candy, and I was like “Well I want candy”. She does plays, everyone’s having a good time, she’s staying out school nights and it all sounded great. So I did a couple of plays with her at a place where she did theatre and that was it, I was hooked!

 

Are you still nervous when going up for auditions? If yes, how do you get over the nerves and perform the best you can?

Yes, I’m still nervous in auditions, but it’s a little bit easier now because with age you are able to recognize that “this isn’t everything”, “this isn’t the end of the world”, I think when you’re young you put so much importance on everything.

As you get older you realize that you will be fine and that this will not somehow stop you from being happy and that’s the goal in life, I think that everyone’s goal is to be happy. – Chris Evans

 

Top three movies you would recommend anyone watch and why?

chris-evans-capLegends of the Fall – It’s a beautiful sweeping epic about brothers, honor, war and responsibility. It’s just a fantastic movie.

I Heart Huckabees – It’s a little bit of a confusing film but I think it’s really brilliant. It’s so intelligent and so well done. There is a documentary called “What The Bleep Do We Know”, and it’s all about your chemical make up and how you can manifest your own day, and I almost feel like “I Heart Huckabees” is the fiction version of that film.

Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind – I like the message, I love the film making, and the actors are phenomenal. It’s one of those movies that is constantly entertaining.

 

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This 16 Year Old App Creator Scored Funding From A Hong Kong Billionaire

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nick daloisio-summly-app


While studying at his parents house in London, Nick D’Aloisio came up with a brilliant idea to create a revolutionary app by the name of Summly which changes the way that you read your favorite websites and social media feeds. This idea scored this 16 year-old genius a flight to New York and some serious money in the bank as a result of an official partnership with the eleventh wealthiest billionaire in the world, Li Ka-Shing who will be overlooking the production and release of this app.

Read on to see how Nick D’Aloisio was able to achieve such a great feat at the fresh young age of 16.

Many young entrepreneurs say they want to create the next Facebook, 16-year-old Nick D’Aloisio wants to solve the problem social networks have created in the first place.

The teenager built an iPhone app called Summly, which automatically generates summaries in the form of bullet points to help you filter through all that information.

With more than $250,000 in seed funding from Hong Kong billionaire businessman Li Ka-shing, D’Aloisio spent the last six months in his parents’ London house building Summly.

It was Sunday at 4 a.m. London time when D’Aloisio enthusiastically IMed me over AOL Messenger to make sure the news of his app made it to my Twitter stream. He was excited that 23,000 people have downloaded the app since it launched last week.

D’Aloisio was inspired to build the app after he signed up for Twitter, and got a flood of information from AP, Reuters, and other people’s Twitter handles.

Interested in finding out more about D’Aloisio, we called him to ask him about this machine learning technology and how he balances his startup with school work. We could hear his faint Australian accent — he’s originally from Perth, Western Australia, (wow, this is where Joel Brown from Addicted2Success.com is from 😉

 

Nick D’Aloisio – The Boy Genius Of Summly

 

Interview With Nick D’Aloisio

Boonsri Dickinson: How do you see the future of search and the Internet?

Nick D’Aloisio:  Consumers want information instantaneously and the search interface needs to accommodate this.

We don’t need more social networks. The new wave of technology will now stop encouraging content creation. Twitter and Facebook is enough…we have too much information. We need to try to filter the content and make it more digestible. Zite and Flipboard attempt to provide the user with the content.

We want people to use Summly once they have found content they are interested in or know what they are searching for.

BD: So how did the app evolve into what it is today?

Nick: Six months ago, we released something called Trimit. It was about content creation. It was a more gimmicky app, where you’d input an article and summarize to 140 characters for Twitter or other restrictions for Tumblr, Facebook, and email. But I found that people were using for consuming content.

Trimit taught me people want content consumption tools not content creation. Now with Summly, you can have a computer to aid that process.

BD: What’s the market for it?

Nick: It’s Cliff Notes for a mobile device. It takes a second to return any search result.

It’s a bit magical. People don’t believe what it can do, then they have a “wow” moment. You can share the summary. You can quickly evaluate the content now.

In the future, it can be applied to email. It’s easy to train it for colloquial language used in email. And eventually it can be used in other areas such as enterprise, consumer markets, and education. We will probably license the technology though monthly fees.

BD: How did you learn to program at age 12?

Nick: Books. C For Dummies. Online Tutorials. Trial and Error.

The first app I built was called Facemood when I was 14. It automatically deduced the mood of a Facebook friend using their latest Facebook status.

Even now, I’m not that confident. As I said I prefer the graphical/product aspect.

BD: What do your classmates think of you?

ND: I’m in year 11 here. I just turned 16 in November.  I hope they just think I’m a nice guy. You wouldn’t know I do this stuff. I’m really happy with the response I’ve been getting. People are amazed.

With all that, I don’t feel like I need to change my life in any way. I play sport — rugby and cricket. And I go out.

I work on the app when I can from like 9-11 pm. And on Sundays. Between school work. It’s pretty hectic.

BD: Who inspires you?

ND: Anyone who is crazy enough to create what’s in their mind. Steve Jobs for his obsession with attention to detail and his advice on failure and success. I’m inspired by designers and typography designers. And innovators like Sergey Brin and Larry Page, the founders of Google, and Jack Dorsey and the other founders of Twitter.

BD: What’s next for you?

ND: I still have three years left of schooling and plan to continue with my education into university, where I hope to study a combination of philosophy and economics, and perhaps continue learning Mandarin. I learn Mandarin because I’m interested in Chinese culture and enjoy languages.

 

Now, check out more about the app in this video:

Introduction Of Summly

 

Interview By Boonsri Dickinson from BusinessInsider.com

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