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7 Ways For Your Startup To Dominate In Sales

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I recently had the pleasure of interviewing one of the greatest entrepreneurs to come out of Australia, Andrew Morello. Andrew has a Tony Robbins, state changer, type quality to him and after hearing him speak you just feel awesome!

Andrew is an all round nice guy and has one of those addictive personalities that everyone wants to be around. He also exuberates a type of confidence that we all wish we had and that every sales person aspires too.

His business ventures include The Entourage (with more than 70,000 business members) with fellow friend Jack Delosa, Bellagio & Co Jewellery and Head of Business Development for Mark Bouris’s Yellow Brick Road. Andrew shot into the spotlight in 2009 when he won the Australian version of the popular television show The Apprentice (the format is similar to the US version with Donald Trump).

Last year he spoke in 19 countries and you will typically see him out and about at entrepreneur events such as the Entourages Unconvention and Scaleable & Saleable, as well as pretty much every entrepreneur, Financial Services or Real Estate related event. He prides himself on being an ex-auctioneer and just a simple boy from Moonee Ponds, and every startup can learn something valuable from him.

“It’s not about the education someone has or where they grew up; it’s more about the sort of person they are”

Below are the top tips from our interview, and there is some cool stuff in there that hasn’t been shared anywhere before. Get into it, get amongst it and get excited!

 

1. Know your 30-second “Why You At 3am”

Andrew gets out of bed every morning because of his 30-second answer at 3am. As the entrepreneur in your startup, it is your job to drive a sales culture, and that starts with you knowing your why – without knowing your why you can’t inspire your sales team. Imagine this, if someone came to your home in the middle of the night and dragged you out of bed, put a gun to your head, and said why you, what would you say? Why do you continue to try and put yourself in the 1% of the population and be an entrepreneur? If the answer is not good enough then you’re dead.

This concept might sound extreme, but the crazy thing is that this happens every day, all over the world. The Nazi’s in the 1930’s, Korea in the 1950’s, Vietnam in the 1970’s, Yugoslav / Bosnia in the 1990’s and Iraq & Syria today. Because we live in the greatest country in the world, Australia, the land of opportunity, we forget why we wake up in the morning and what motivates us.

Andrew’s why you is “ he wants to make lots and lots of money, to pay other people really well, to do the things he doesn’t want to do, so he can do more things he loves doing, with the people that he loves.” Remind yourself that you are in the 1% and within that 1% there is a 0.1% and in order to get where you want to go you must know your why you.

“If you believe in what you do, even if you are the nerdiest guy in the world, people will be inspired by your vision. You don’t need to be a great salesman; you just need to be passionate and believe in what you’re doing“

 

2. Use your startups strengths

The advantage of a startup is that you are nimble. You can evolve your product or your service overnight, which a big company can’t do. This only works though if you’re prepared to evolve.

Andrew has had people come to him and say things like, “I have a client, and I thought they were going to move forward with my product, but then they told me they wanted something completely different, and I told them that that’s not what we provide.”

This is the wrong thing to say, it’s what you provide now. If that client is prepared to write out a cheque tomorrow and get started, then you do what you need to do to generate income and serve that customer in anyway you can.

“Play to your strengths and work on your weaknesses”

Remember to remove your ego because if you’re going to be in the world of entrepreneurialism then you do what the market wants and what your clients want. If you’re not prepared to make those changes, then you might be better working for a large organisation.

 

3. Build sales confidence

Life around sales is a game of building confidence. The more door knocking and phone calls your sales people do, the more confident they get. A great way for startups to get their employees to build more confidence is to gamify the sales cycle. Get all the guys to stay on a Tuesday night to make prospecting calls and give out prizes and trophies so that they compete against each other and forget about that they are doing sales.

Build a culture around the relationship and make your sales people know that this comes first, and the transaction comes second – this helps recession proof your business. Andrew believes that if you build a culture around your sales people acting with a Boiler Room (sales movie) or Wolf of Wall Street style, you’re destined for failure.

 

4. The way you hire sales people matters

You should always try and hire sales people on culture and enthusiasm – don’t hire on skillset or experience. Make sure their core values and beliefs are in line with yours, and your startups – you can always teach someone about your product. Many startups are scared to send sales people out on the road who haven’t got experience in something like IT. Andrew says that in the early days you can send them to a client to do a fact find / client analysis, get them to fill out a document, and allow a relationship to be built over the course of the meeting.

A couple of days later they can come back with a tailored proposal for their business. If the sales person is enthusiastic and prepared to go above and beyond the call of duty, no client will expect them to know something complex like a cloud-based product. The client will expect them to represent their business, be on call for them and be prepared to grow with them on the journey of their business.

Gone are the days of pressure selling, we are in a world of permission selling. You need to win over the prospect and form a relationship with them.

 

5. Three traits to look for in salespeople:

Humility –someone who treats everybody equal and tries to do the right thing by people (Andrew did this by being the simple boy from Monee Ponds and staying grounded)

Empathy – someone who understands where people come from

Resilience – someone who can handle getting a lot of no’s especially in the early days when they will get the most.

As a startup, having so few sales people and manpower is a big advantage for you. If you’re not a good sales person, don’t try and be. Go and find someone who is and hire them. You need to sell this person the dream (legitimately) and tell them that you can’t pay a lot of wages but that you will give them great commissions. If the business reaches certain revenue points, you could give them a chance to earn in at a discounted rate or buy into the business. This way of thinking will attract good talent and help make them an owner in the business and have skin in the game. If you sell the dream to 10 people, you may only find that one in ten will reach the set targets or want to pursue this path.

It’s also a great idea to sell this same dream on the operations side too. You might think that you can never afford to pay these people good money or that they would be interested in an earn-in, but that’s not true, these types of people are dying to work with someone who is a great sales person. The idea of them working with someone who is a visionary and an inspiration helps these operations people to do what they love doing which might be maintaining or building the product. Even if you can’t remunerate them greatly at the start, it’s important to sell the dream and show them that their hard work could help them become an owner in the business.

 

6. Once the sales model is right, know how to scale it

A great way to scale a good sales model quickly, is to let a strong sales person build out their own team and run it as a business within your business (this is the intraprenuer model we hear so much about these days). If they were to take three people under their wing and mentor them, then you could offer them a 2% commission on anything these three team members produce. If this goes well, you could also offer them equity later on.

Another model for scaling the sales model quickly is to partner with people. This model can be a recipe for disaster or a recipe for massive success, so you need to have some quality agreements in place so that you can end the relationship quickly if things don’t work out. Don’t be disheartened if this doesn’t work the first time, just evolve quickly and find the next partner.

Andrew Morello and Tim Denning Addicted2Success Interview

Left: Andrew Morello Right: Tim Denning

 

7. Don’t make these mistakes with your startup

One common mistake that startups make is that they try and sell the big package. In financial services, that could be trying to sell the home loan, insurance, financial planning and income protection all on the first contact. The client needs to get to know you and like you first. Try and sell them one product or service first, and then win them over, get a couple of referrals and then look to see what else you can sell to them later.

Giving up too early can be another fatal mistake in sales. Andrew tells some sales people that they need to make a hundred calls a day to test them. Shortly after, they come back and say it was too hard. Andrew asks them how many calls they made over the last two weeks, and they might say 300. They could of at least tried 50 a day as a bare minimum but at just 300, they give up. You must be prepared to take the no’s and be resilient.

Andrew also shared with me a story about a guy that had 30 appointments and didn’t get a single sale out of it. He came to Andrew and said I don’t think this is for me. The guy had made a very large financial commitment in the business and left a big corporate role to go out on his own. They went back and did some work on his relationship building and discovered that he needed to win the client over first.

Having originally been in a corporate role he hadn’t done client facing, so he had the mindset of just wanting to get the appointment out of the way in 15 minutes. Through the process of coaching with Andrew, he began to realise that prospective clients just wanted him to listen to them and that the appointments needed to go for longer in order to achieve this. Half the time he didn’t even needed to say much, it was just a matter of listening and genuinely caring about their situation.

By talking more with his clients about their families, sporting interests, the charity work he does in the community and his very personal story of his son who had autism, the prospects could see he was being genuine and showing a bit of vulnerability. The business has now turned around, and he is in the top 10% of his field. In his case, he was doing all the right things he just needed to talk with his prospects about them.

“If you’re not that type of sales person then find someone to represent your business who is”

 

Final Thought

Make sure that you as the entrepreneur and your sales team, stay humble, be prepared to work hard, concentrate on the relationship, and the sales will come as a by-product of all of that. Australia is one of the last western countries in the world where you can arrive on a boat, as a refugee, and if you’re prepared to work hard, you can be as good as the most successful person in Australia.

One of the best books that Andrew suggests you read (I suggest it as well) is “Think and Grow Rich”, by Napoleon Hill. It might sound a bit cliché, but a lot of the concepts in this article are represented in this classic book.

Andrew was also lucky enough to train with Deepak Chopra and learn a number of concepts such as the 7 Spiritual Laws of Success. What he learnt from these concepts was how to let go of the outcome, practice present moment awareness and embracing uncertainty – don’t try and plan everything otherwise you will achieve nothing.

Tony Robbins courses were another one of Andrews learning’s through his business journey. The main lesson Andrew uses from those teachings is “energy trumps all.” He was on stage the other day with one of the most well-known people in the technology space who has amassed a large fortune, but Andrew won the audience over because he had them standing up, in a peak state and cheering. The content is not always the most important thing; it’s the energy in which you deliver it.

Andrew has seen this first hand with his own mentor, Mark Bouris, who is turning 60 next year and has more energy than most twenty-year-olds. Often Andrew is asked how he gets so much done in the boardroom without a university level education, his answer……he has more energy in that board room than anyone else and when he’s asked what he’s on, he tells them life, and then they get their chequebook out.

Andrews’s philosophy on life, “if something is no longer fun, I’ll go home”. His philosophy has held him in good stead throughout his entrepreneurial adventures.

If you would like to connect with Andrew or follow him, then you can below: 
Website – www.andrewmorello.com
Instagram – @andrewmorello
Facebook – Andrew Marcello Morello
Twitter – @ AndrewMorello

 

Tim is best known as a long-time contributor on Addicted2Success. Tim's content has been shared millions of times and he has written multiple viral posts all around personal development and entrepreneurship.You can connect with Tim through his website www.timdenning.net

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2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. Samantha King

    Aug 22, 2015 at 4:57 am

    Great article. Ive read the books suggested in the past and I would agree they are very appropriate to both new start up entrepreneurs and those established in business seeking to expand.

    • Tim Denning

      Dec 30, 2015 at 2:39 am

      Thank you Samantha, I have read the books as well.

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Startups

You Are The Problem With Your Business

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A great way to screw up your company is to get into the habit of blaming your suppliers, the market, your staff or your product for your failures.

I recently heard a story of a business that had set up a website. They sold various products and services focusing on helping people with psychological issues. The business owner was smart. The product solved a problem.

Unfortunately, the company was making almost no money. They’d hired someone to help them with their digital marketing and it wasn’t working.

Plenty of traffic was coming to the site, users were having a look around and then not buying a single thing. Who’s fault was this?

Well, according to the business owner it was the person running their digital marketing. As a result, they wasted approximately eight months marketing a website that couldn’t make any sales. The reason the business was failing according to the owner was because of the keywords that were being targeted in the marketing campaign. This is a horrible excuse.

The reason your business fails is because you’re blaming someone other than yourself. It’s the quickest way to bankruptcy. Don’t do that.


Your company is a reflection of you.

It took me a long time to figure out that a company is a reflection of its founder.

One of the businesses I had, had a toxic culture and a bunch of people that were rude to customers, arrogant and not nice people. That was a reflection of exactly who I was at the time.

The company was reflecting the flaws of my own life and what I refused to admit.

In the case of the business owner above, what was obvious is that they were good at telling lies to themselves. It was easy not to change as a business owner and insist that the change needed was nothing to do with their vision.

The issue of their company was not the digital marketing strategy but their lack of understanding around what their customer wanted.

The thought that their products were too complicated, not solving a real problem or priced incorrectly was an admission of guilt they wanted no part in. Hence the eventual demise of their company.


Take responsibility and it will change.

When you own the business, everything is your fault.

You have the power to solve any problem you choose. It starts with you being brave enough to admit that there’s a problem, and then secondly, being bold enough to insist it’s your fault and that you can change it.

The problems in your business can all be solved. That’s what it took me a very long time to understand. When I changed as a person and faced up to my hidden battle with mental illness that I didn’t want to talk about, the odds turned in my favor.

Had I have not taken responsibility for my mental illness, I would have never become a leader in a business or started another side hustle. I would have been crippled by the big, bad world that I thought I could control.

Control came from responsibility, and responsibility solved the major problem in my business: me.


Change is a must.

Not with your digital marketing strategy.
Not with hiring new people.
Not with developing a new product.

Changing yourself is the *must* because YOU attract the problems and the solutions into your business”

You can’t find the solutions or stop the never-ending problems until you stop the cause of it all: you. You’re the problem with your business. The good news is that it’s entirely within your control to fix.

Change you.

Not the business.

<<<>>>

If you want to increase your productivity and learn some more valuable life hacks, then join my private mailing list on timdenning.net

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Startups

The Different Ways of Measuring the Success of Your Start-Up

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Image Credit: Unsplash

You’ve probably heard people use the term “unicorn” in a business context. This means a privately held start-up whose value has grown to at least one billion American dollars. Think Airbnb, Uber, and so forth. There is no doubt that some start-ups have been major financial successes. And many smaller-scale start-ups are doing great as well, working hard and turning a steady profit. But that begs the question of whether finances are the only way to measure the success of a start-up. As it turns out, they might not be. At least, not always and not on their own.

How to Evaluate Success

As anyone who’s been involved with start-ups knows, you need a fair amount of flexibility to do well in this environment. Take the division of labour for example – rather than strict roles, you’ll often see everyone do a bit of everything. The same principle extends to measuring success. It can be vague and mean different things to different people, and it can change over time.

But amongst all that vagueness, one thing has become clear. Predicting the success of a start-up is very difficult for external observers. As a matter of fact, it’s often impossible. Therefore, in order to evaluate how successful a start-up has truly been, we need to know the goals of its founder(s).

“Success means we go to sleep at night knowing that our talents and abilities were used in a way that served others.” – Marianne Williamson

The Numbers

When people think about business, it’s common to boil matters down to the finances. And it certainly is possible to use numbers to measure and predict the performance of a start-up business. Net worth, gross margin, customer acquisition cost – these can all be indicators of success. But, a start-up can post impressive numbers for a while, perhaps even attract large investors, and still shut down in the end. So does this make it a failure?

The answer to this depends. If the founders wanted to start a lasting business, then yes, they failed to meet their goal. However, that isn’t always the case. If they were looking for a short-term solution and came out with more money than they had coming in, a closed-down start-up needn’t be unsuccessful. It can actually be the opposite of that.

So, looking at the figures isn’t enough, and there are different perspectives to consider. When they start planning their business venture, start-up founders may not have any particular numbers in mind when it comes to profit. Instead, they can judge their success according to some of the following criteria.

1. Happy Customers and Solving Problems

The story of a start-up often begins with a problem. The desire to help people overcome a specific issue can be the spark which ignites the creation of an entire business. And in the end, that may be all that matters to the founders.

This is closely connected to the happiness of the customers. If the resulting product or service has made people happy by helping them solve a problem, that is all that may be required for a start-up to be a success. Now, no business wants unsatisfied customers. But in cases like this, happy customers aren’t the way toward the ultimate goal – they are that goal.

In other words, some start-up founders don’t just use financial reports to measure how much they’ve achieved. To them, the one metric which stands above all others is the quantity of positive feedback they’ve received. The main area of focus is customers who use the start-up’s products or services to solve a problem they were having.

2. Impact

Every start-up founder likes doing well in terms of revenue. But for some of these entrepreneurs, the profit is merely a side effect of what they actually set out to do – impact the world in a positive manner. You can see an example of this line of thought with Elon Musk. He said that back in college, he had wanted to be a part of things that could end up changing the world. The continuation of this philosophy is evident in his electric cars (which aim to reduce pollution) and the SpaceX program (which strives to break down some of the barriers of space exploration).

In both cases, the furthering of mankind is the ultimate goal. Many other start-up founders feel the same, even if they have smaller goals in mind. To these people, there is no greater proof of success than if their company has had a positive impact on society or even a small segment of it. In their view, to make a difference is to succeed.

“The only limit to your impact is your imagination and commitment.” – Tony Robbins

3. Freedom

For some, starting up their own business is less about getting rich and more about gaining the freedom to conduct their business the way they want to. In this case, financial success is just a means to an end. The endgame is to be your own boss.

The fact is, some people don’t do well when they’re constantly receiving orders. They are simply hardwired to be free thinkers and they require an environment that allows them to do things in their own way.

Being in a position where you hold all the cards can be exhilarating. The knowledge that your decisions are final is very empowering, and many strive for such freedom. If a start-up can allow such people to go from being a regular employee to being in charge of making all the decisions, then it has already achieved all the success that it needs to.

4. Time for Friends and Family

As many people know all too well, a job can easily turn into the focal point of your daily life. Instead of being a way to support your lifestyle, your work dominates your time. And when that happens, the time you have to dedicate to your loved ones becomes scarce. Combating this is precisely what some have in mind when they decide to take the leap and start their own business.

Now, running your own company is no mean feat and it will require a lot of effort. But the beginning is the most time-consuming part of the process. Later on, it can be possible to create a system which leaves you with a lot more time on your hands. You can spend this time with your significant other, your children, or your friends. A start-up which gives you this opportunity is perhaps the greatest success of all.

A start-up is an extension of its founders and so are that company’s goals. Some entrepreneurs are in it for the profit, but not all of them. In the end, there is no single way to measure the success of a start-up. It all comes down to the specific aims of those who established it. But if the founders can end their day on a happy note, then the venture is a success even if it doesn’t fit some standard definition of the term.

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Startups

The Problem Is Not Your Website Or Your Product.

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spend a lot of my time talking to business owners. They focus on their product, their marketing channels and trying to make more profit.

I met one such business owner who was in the plastic surgery business. Their product (boob jobs and nose jobs) was not working. Their website sucked and people clicked off as soon as they visited it.

People would call their office, get put on hold, listen to the on hold message and hang up.

This business didn’t seem all that special. I’ve talked to many businesses and didn’t think for a microsecond that a plastic surgery clinic could ever teach me anything valuable.

I’ve been to Hollywood on holidays and the issues of body image are all too apparent to me. Anyway, this post is not about body image.

I ended up losing this business as a customer — not that I would ever have sold anything to them if it were up to me. I sat down one afternoon and thought about why we no longer did business with them.

That’s when I realized it’s not about your product or your website. All the issues with this plastic surgery clinic and a lot of other businesses I’ve dealt with stem from one thing. Let me explain in more detail.


Your Google Reviews say you’re an piece of work.

I looked up their Google Reviews and their customers said they were assholes.

They spoke down to clients, they didn’t deliver their clients what they wanted, they argued with their staff in front of customers and they treated people like they were nothing more than a dollar sign.

All I had to do was read their Google reviews to see that the problem wasn’t their product or their website.


Your clients tell you every day that you suck.

I asked the plastic surgery what their clients said.

Many of their clients told them that their services sucked and they would prefer to go to places like Thailand where they could get a better product at a much lower price.

The business owner made the mistake of thinking it was their product that was the problem and that a new website will tell clients a different message.

That wasn’t it.


You abuse your staff and they consistently leave.

I spoke with many staff that worked for this business.

Every single one of them hated the company and were not afraid to say what they thought of the business owner.

The business owner would sit outside on a nice sunny day and look across the street at all the yachts and the people boarding them.

They’d sit there and think that every lead they got was going to take them one step closer to owning their very own yacht.

“If only I could deliver more boob jobs, maybe I could have one of those,” they thought quietly to themselves hoping that no one else could hear how ridiculous this sounded.

I can remember multiple times being on the phone to the business owner and having one of their staff burst into tears halfway through the call.

The first time it happened I didn’t think much. After the third time, I got the message. During the short time I dealt with this business, people consistently left. If you made it to the six-month mark, you were some sort of hero and would probably be given a free surgery to say thank you for your work and make you feel worse about your own body at the same time.

It was free noses and boobs in return for daily abuse.

The problem still wasn’t the website all the product.


You don’t solve real problems; you solve your own problem.

A good business solves a problem.

That problem typically affects human beings and solving it is how you make money in business. Solving problems can start out with a problem that affects you, but at some point, you’ve got to start solving that same problem for other people/businesses.

This owner of this plastic surgery clinic was only trying to solve their own problem which was making more money to buy fancy items like yachts.

Only solving your own problem is not just selfish but bad business.

Good business is solving a big problem or lots of small problems for entire strangers who you don’t know thus doing something valuable for the human race.

Solving only your problem will make you poor.

The problem still wasn’t their website or product.


Creating more problems.

Everything this business owner sold created more problems.

They’d film videos to purposely make people feel like their body wasn’t perfect.

They’d write articles suggesting that everyone needs botox to feel young.

They’d take photos of men and women who were supposed to be perfect so that young people would dream of looking like them.

Not only was their business not solving a real problem; it was also creating more problems every day that it existed.

If your business creates more problems than it solves, you’re in real trouble.You need to take a long hard look at the business and become obsessed with doing everything you can to change it — and do so damn fast to limit the whirlwind of problems you’re creating behind you.


The heart of the problem.

It’s the business owner.

The business I mentioned will fail. That part is certain. The problem with the business is not the website or the product.

The problem is the business has no heart because the business owner has no heart.

You cannot focus on your own selfish desires, create really bad problems in the world, treat other human beings like garbage and expect to go buy a yacht and live happily ever after. It just doesn’t happen like that.

Whether you are a plastic surgery clinic like the one I described or a solo entrepreneur, the problem with your business is you.

Fix the problem of YOU. You can’t get away with being horrible forever.
Being horrible is bad business.

Being respectful, kind and valuable is the final answer to the problem with your business.

<<<>>>

If you want to increase your productivity and learn some more valuable life hacks, then join my private mailing list on timdenning.net

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Entrepreneurs

18 Must Read Business Books for Emerging Entrepreneurs and Startups

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business books

Reading is both relaxation and training for the mind. Who reads, dives into another world. Learning, entertaining and breaking out of everyday life for a short moment. One could go even so far as to say reading is the second most beautiful thing in the world! Whether it is non-fiction or a novel of all the world’s man has created, the book is the most powerful tool. That is also, why we wanted to find out which business book you should undertake in the new year. (more…)

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