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(Video) Tony Robbins *Rare* Interview – Secrets To Life

Joel Brown (Founder of Addicted2Success.com)

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tony robbins jack black

Do yourself a favor and reserve 13 minutes aside  in your day today to watch this video by Anthony Robbins. Tony Robbins reveals the invisible forces that motivate everyone’s actions.

Life is a gift, and it offers us the privilege, opportunity, and responsibility to give something back by becoming more.  – Tony Robbins

 

(Video) Tony Robbins *Rare* Interview – Secrets To Life

I am the the Founder of Addicted2Success.com and I am so grateful you're here to be part of this awesome community. I love connecting with people who have a passion for Entrepreneurship, Self Development & Achieving Success. I started this website with the intention of educating and inspiring likeminded people to always strive for success no matter what their circumstances. I'm proud to say through my podcast and through this website we have impacted over 100 million lives in the last 6 and a half years.

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Interviews

The Questions You Have Always Wanted To Ask A Spiritual Leader

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It’s not often we get to sit on the floor, barefoot and in lotus position while interviewing a spiritual author whose journey and teachings have positively influenced the lives of hundreds of thousands of people.

10995998_10204532948777710_3703269667569988_nTimber Hawkeye, author of the best-selling spiritual guide ‘Buddhist Boot Camp’ offers a non-sectarian approach to being at peace with the world, both within and around us. His intention in ‘Buddhist Boot Camp’ and life is to awaken, enlighten, enrich and inspire.

Timber was kind enough to give us his time on his worldwide book tour to answer some of the questions not many get to ask him but all want to know.

Make yourself a cup of tea, light a few candles and enjoy!

 

1. What is the message behind Buddhist Boot Camp?

“If I was to incapsulate it, the message would be simple – be grateful and be kind. It’s important to understand that we create a lot of our own suffering – by becoming aware that we hold the responsibility to create our own happiness, we empower ourselves to live a more relaxed, compassionate and positive life.”

 

2. How did the book come to be?

“I never had the intention to sit down and write a book. When I moved to Hawaii, I didn’t have a place to live, I didn’t have a job lined up and I didn’t know what I was going to do – I just knew that I wanted to live a more relaxed and free life. Every month I would send a letter to my friends and family, updating them on how my simplistic and non materialistic life was turning out.

After about 8 years of continual updates, thoughts and teachings, my friend who was moved by what I wrote about, suggested that I take all those emails and letters and make them public. So that’s what ‘Buddhist Boot Camp’ is – a collection of all my journal entires, emails and letters to friends compiled into a book. That’s why every chapter is only a page long and can be read in any order.”

 

3. Is there a difference between being religious and being spiritual?

Absolutely! Organized religion provides answers for us to follow while spirituality keeps us in a place of questioning and inquiry. With spirituality we make peace with not knowing, with not having all the answers and not having only one truth. Truth within spirituality has a small ’T’ while in religion, it’s capitalized on being the universal truth above all else.

That’s why there is so much hostility between different religions – they believe their truth is the only truth and most superior to any other explanation. While spirituality leaves us in a place of searching, wonder, open mindfulness and open heartfulness to not be so quick to judge or label.”

Buddha-Quote-Becoming-Yourself

 

4. You quote the Dalai Lama saying, “Don’t try to use what you learn from Buddhism to be a Buddhist; use it to be a better whatever-you-already-are.” Can you elaborate on that?

“I don’t think a label is important at all. I am a lot of things – not only one (label) defines me. Meaning it’s not about being a buddhist, it’s about being ‘Buddha-like’ or not being Christian but being ‘Christ-like’ and that’s a really important invitation to not focus so much on the label but on the actual teachings. Living this way makes you ask yourself ‘how can my actions be inline with my values?’ because your beliefs don’t make you a better person, your behavior does. So it does matter who you are or what you want to be just be really good at it.”

 

4. You say to focus on the teachings not the teachers. What do you mean and why?

“We tend to put the ‘teachers’ of faith up on a pedestal and look up to them. Shunryū Suzuki wrote about how there are no enlightened beings, only enlightened activity and that was very empowering for me. The people we perceive to be enlightened i.e. the Dalai Lama, Jesus, Buddha, they’re people like you and I however they just made enlightened activity apart of their everyday lives.

And so by bringing ourselves up to eye level with those figures, you become empowered and confident in your abilities to become enlightened.”

 

5. Do you believe success and spirituality coexist? Typically society tells us we can only develop one or the other.

Most definitely! You need to understand that ‘typically’ the opinion of success in society is skewed. Success to me is being happy. To me spirituality is a means to happiness and so success and spirituality can very much coexist. I don’t have a lot of money however I feel like the richest man in the world because I am happy – and spirituality brings that to me. I think there would be nothing worse than being super wealthy but feeling unfulfilled and unhappy internally.”

what-we-think-we-become-buddha-quote

 

6. Meditation seems to be a buzz word lately, what is it, how do you do it and can someone with no previous experience with meditation still benefit?

Of course! You’re right, meditation is a buzz word at the moment which is a shame because with that brings assumptions – assumptions of how it should be done, what it is and who should do it. People seek out to be ‘taught’ meditation however I shy away from giving instruction because the moment you do, you’re implying there is a wrong way to meditate. I have a lot of individuals come up to me and voice that they are meditating wrong or they don’t know how to do it but in-fact there is no ‘wrong way’ of meditating. As long as the intention is there, your attempts are successful.

The whole point of meditation is to learn how to control your mind. So if you find that there is something you do which relaxes you and in which your mind doesn’t wonder – it could be jogging, hiking, gardening, doing puzzles, painting and if while you’re doing that your mind stays focused – you’re meditating. Its that simple. There’s no need to sit in full lotus position or burn incense or chant chakras – mediation is just the practice of focusing your mind.”

 

7. What’s one exercise or activity you would recommend we do starting today to lead a more positive, happy and fulfilled life?

“Keep a gratitude journal. Every single morning, make it the first thing you do – take out your journal and just start listing anything and everything you’re grateful for.  It can be as simple as “I am so grateful to be alive today” or “I am so grateful for all my friends and family” or “I am so grateful for all the opportunities I attract into my life”.

You can even download a gratitude app to your smart phone if journaling isn’t for you. What’s cool about the app is you can also document photos, videos and voice memos as well as text.

When you live and come from a place of complete gratitude, everything changes and you have no choice but to become a happier person.”

 

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(Video) Gary Vaynerchuk’s Unforgettable Advice For Achieving Success

Joel Brown (Founder of Addicted2Success.com)

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Gary Vaynerchuk VaynerMedia

We recently caught up with the multi-millionaire entrepreneur Gary Vaynerchuk for an exclusive, one of a kind interview. Gary is an entrepreneurial wizard, with unforgettable advice for all with a humble yet electric personality and charm.

Gary was able to build his family wine business from 3 Million to 60 Million in a matter of years using creative and innovative marketing techniques, on and offline. His company “VaynerMedia” are the brains and promotional orchestrators behind some of America’s largest companies and personalities.

Gary Vaynerchuk is a world-renowned expert in Social Media and is the author of a number of New York Times best-selling books including “Crush It!“, and “The Thank You Economy“. He and is set for a third book on the way with his soon to be released, and highly anticipated “Jab, Jab, Jab, Right Hook: How to Tell Your Story in a Noisy Social World“.

 

Gary Vaynerchuk’s Unforgettable Advice For Achieving Success

 

Great Gary Vaynerchuk Quotes

“We’re not really good at knowing what we want, and we are very quick to say “this sucks”. That’s where the opportunity lies.” – Gary Vaynerchuk

“You didn’t grow up driving…you figured it out.” – Gary Vaynerchuk

Embrace what you’re good at. Lebron didn’t try to become a professor. – Gary Vaynerchuk

“Legacy is greater than currency.” – Gary Vaynerchuk

“If you live for weekends or vacations, your shit is broken.” – Gary Vaynerchuk

“We only get to play this game one time…one life.” – Gary Vaynerchuk

“In 2006, the Blockbuster board got together and said, ‘Do you know anyone using Netflix.’ …Look how that worked out. That is what happens when you put ten 80-year-old guys in a room…Be on record. Be on the right side of history. You don’t want to be the person that supported the Blockbuster decision.” – Gary Vaynerchuk

“There’s no reason in 2013, to do shit you hate. NONE.” – Gary Vaynerchuk

“A penguin cannot become a giraffe, so just be the best penguin you can be.” – Gary Vaynerchuk

 

Gary Vaynerchuk Entrepreneur Picture Quote For Success

 

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Captain America “Chris Evans” Shares His Advice For Success and Acting

Joel Brown (Founder of Addicted2Success.com)

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Chris Evans, the actor of Captain America recently appeared on Spreecast for a live Q&A with his fans and had an awesome amount of positive energy and inspirational advice to share with his followers.

We transcribed Chis Evans great answers and advice just for you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chris Evans Inspirational Answers To Living A Successful Life

 

What’s it like being part of something so big like “The Avengers”?

Intimidating, a little overwhelming but you are overwhelmed with gratitude. When you are making it, you don’t really know it’s going to be that big, even when it comes out you forget what’s really happening.

I try to think about what I would have thought when I was 18 before I started this career and I think it would be radically different, but overtime, the more movies you make you just get used to the routine of the movies coming out, you’re in the mall, you’re in the press, you’re trying to get another job and it all becomes this piece in the puzzle of work.

I think you become a little de-sensitized; you’re like “Great! That did well, Good Job!”. You are still grateful but you’re not just sitting there like “WOW!, Look at this!, Look what I was a part of”, it doesn’t always feel that way, which is a shame, because it should and I think that’s part of what I try to remind myself of, to be appreciative.

Gratitude is the key to happiness, if you have a healthy understanding of gratitude, you can’t lose. – Chris Evans

 

What’s your favorite part of being Captain America?

chris evans captain america actorI really like playing a good super hero. Not that the other super heroes are bad, but a lot of other super heroes are tortured souls, they have demons that they’re fighting. Caps just a really good guy, apart from being a super hero and having super powers, he’s just a really good man.

Any role that you play, if you are in a head space for an extended period of time, you really have to think a certain type of way and get inside the head of a character and sometimes I play dark characters or frustrated characters and it’s negative because you are trying to tap into the parts of you that can connect to that, the parts of you from your own personal history and experience that you can identify and relate to, you have to find pieces of you that are in common.

So while playing Captain America on a daily basis, you are trying to tap into the best part of yourself, and it’s Inspiring, you want to do better, you want to do good, it’s a healthy head space to be in and I think it’s rewarding playing someone with such a good heart.

 

How do you stay true to your self without letting the fame get to your head?

I go home a lot, back to Boston. LA is a tricky place to be, and it’s not just fame that’s the thing. Whether you are famous or not you are in a business of rejection, competition, comparison and you live in your own head quite a bit, which is not a good place for anyone to be for an extended period of time.

When you are back at home, you remember your youth, you are surrounded by friends and family who don’t care if you are successful in this industry or not and your priorities shift and all of a sudden the things that truly matter, start to come back to life.

 

Do you have a quote song lyric or saying that inspires you?

I really like Eckhart Tolle, he wrote the book “The Power of Now”. I am a big fan of Buddhism, Eastern Philosophy, the notion of trying to be present in the moment, turning the third eye off and detaching from ego

Eckhart has a quote from his book called “Stillness Speaks” that just really resonated with me, enough to permanently ink my body, and it says:

“When you lose touch with your inner stillness, you lose touch with yourself, when you lose touch with yourself, you lose yourself in the world.”

And it just made so much sense to me, still does, always will. It’s something that always brings me back to being centered.

 

What book are you currently reading?

Chris-Evans-actor-captain americaIt’s a book called “The Honeymoon Effect”, by an author called Bruce Lipton, who wrote a book called “The Biology of Belief” and it’s a really clever book. It’s about how for the longest time scientists thought that your DNA was determined by your genetics and how this one guy is proving that your DNA can be affected by your thought, your emotions, your daily choices, how you interact with the world through your thinking and that it can actually change your chemistry.

So this guy wrote a book called “The Honeymoon Effect” and it’s about how we can sustain healthy relationships in our life. Not just with men and women but with all of our relations and all of our interactions throughout our life. I just love his writing.

 

Did anyone influence you to get into acting?

My older sister.

When I was younger I didn’t act in my first play until I was in 6th or 7th grade. I saw my older sister doing it and she was having a ball. We would go and see her after her plays and my parents would give her candy, and I was like “Well I want candy”. She does plays, everyone’s having a good time, she’s staying out school nights and it all sounded great. So I did a couple of plays with her at a place where she did theatre and that was it, I was hooked!

 

Are you still nervous when going up for auditions? If yes, how do you get over the nerves and perform the best you can?

Yes, I’m still nervous in auditions, but it’s a little bit easier now because with age you are able to recognize that “this isn’t everything”, “this isn’t the end of the world”, I think when you’re young you put so much importance on everything.

As you get older you realize that you will be fine and that this will not somehow stop you from being happy and that’s the goal in life, I think that everyone’s goal is to be happy. – Chris Evans

 

Top three movies you would recommend anyone watch and why?

chris-evans-capLegends of the Fall – It’s a beautiful sweeping epic about brothers, honor, war and responsibility. It’s just a fantastic movie.

I Heart Huckabees – It’s a little bit of a confusing film but I think it’s really brilliant. It’s so intelligent and so well done. There is a documentary called “What The Bleep Do We Know”, and it’s all about your chemical make up and how you can manifest your own day, and I almost feel like “I Heart Huckabees” is the fiction version of that film.

Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind – I like the message, I love the film making, and the actors are phenomenal. It’s one of those movies that is constantly entertaining.

 

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This 16 Year Old App Creator Scored Funding From A Hong Kong Billionaire

Joel Brown (Founder of Addicted2Success.com)

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While studying at his parents house in London, Nick D’Aloisio came up with a brilliant idea to create a revolutionary app by the name of Summly which changes the way that you read your favorite websites and social media feeds. This idea scored this 16 year-old genius a flight to New York and some serious money in the bank as a result of an official partnership with the eleventh wealthiest billionaire in the world, Li Ka-Shing who will be overlooking the production and release of this app.

Read on to see how Nick D’Aloisio was able to achieve such a great feat at the fresh young age of 16.

Many young entrepreneurs say they want to create the next Facebook, 16-year-old Nick D’Aloisio wants to solve the problem social networks have created in the first place.

The teenager built an iPhone app called Summly, which automatically generates summaries in the form of bullet points to help you filter through all that information.

With more than $250,000 in seed funding from Hong Kong billionaire businessman Li Ka-shing, D’Aloisio spent the last six months in his parents’ London house building Summly.

It was Sunday at 4 a.m. London time when D’Aloisio enthusiastically IMed me over AOL Messenger to make sure the news of his app made it to my Twitter stream. He was excited that 23,000 people have downloaded the app since it launched last week.

D’Aloisio was inspired to build the app after he signed up for Twitter, and got a flood of information from AP, Reuters, and other people’s Twitter handles.

Interested in finding out more about D’Aloisio, we called him to ask him about this machine learning technology and how he balances his startup with school work. We could hear his faint Australian accent — he’s originally from Perth, Western Australia, (wow, this is where Joel Brown from Addicted2Success.com is from 😉

 

Nick D’Aloisio – The Boy Genius Of Summly

 

Interview With Nick D’Aloisio

Boonsri Dickinson: How do you see the future of search and the Internet?

Nick D’Aloisio:  Consumers want information instantaneously and the search interface needs to accommodate this.

We don’t need more social networks. The new wave of technology will now stop encouraging content creation. Twitter and Facebook is enough…we have too much information. We need to try to filter the content and make it more digestible. Zite and Flipboard attempt to provide the user with the content.

We want people to use Summly once they have found content they are interested in or know what they are searching for.

BD: So how did the app evolve into what it is today?

Nick: Six months ago, we released something called Trimit. It was about content creation. It was a more gimmicky app, where you’d input an article and summarize to 140 characters for Twitter or other restrictions for Tumblr, Facebook, and email. But I found that people were using for consuming content.

Trimit taught me people want content consumption tools not content creation. Now with Summly, you can have a computer to aid that process.

BD: What’s the market for it?

Nick: It’s Cliff Notes for a mobile device. It takes a second to return any search result.

It’s a bit magical. People don’t believe what it can do, then they have a “wow” moment. You can share the summary. You can quickly evaluate the content now.

In the future, it can be applied to email. It’s easy to train it for colloquial language used in email. And eventually it can be used in other areas such as enterprise, consumer markets, and education. We will probably license the technology though monthly fees.

BD: How did you learn to program at age 12?

Nick: Books. C For Dummies. Online Tutorials. Trial and Error.

The first app I built was called Facemood when I was 14. It automatically deduced the mood of a Facebook friend using their latest Facebook status.

Even now, I’m not that confident. As I said I prefer the graphical/product aspect.

BD: What do your classmates think of you?

ND: I’m in year 11 here. I just turned 16 in November.  I hope they just think I’m a nice guy. You wouldn’t know I do this stuff. I’m really happy with the response I’ve been getting. People are amazed.

With all that, I don’t feel like I need to change my life in any way. I play sport — rugby and cricket. And I go out.

I work on the app when I can from like 9-11 pm. And on Sundays. Between school work. It’s pretty hectic.

BD: Who inspires you?

ND: Anyone who is crazy enough to create what’s in their mind. Steve Jobs for his obsession with attention to detail and his advice on failure and success. I’m inspired by designers and typography designers. And innovators like Sergey Brin and Larry Page, the founders of Google, and Jack Dorsey and the other founders of Twitter.

BD: What’s next for you?

ND: I still have three years left of schooling and plan to continue with my education into university, where I hope to study a combination of philosophy and economics, and perhaps continue learning Mandarin. I learn Mandarin because I’m interested in Chinese culture and enjoy languages.

 

Now, check out more about the app in this video:

Introduction Of Summly

 

Interview By Boonsri Dickinson from BusinessInsider.com

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What I’ve Learned Working In Finance For Six Years (Hint: It Applies To Everyone)

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I’ve been in the corporate world of finance now for more than six years. I get everyone from kids straight out of college, to older guys and girls that have been out of the workforce for ages, to people looking for a career change asking about the finance industry.

I’ve found the real lessons I’ve gained from working in finance are far broader than just one industry. Finance has taught me life skills and how to deal with people. While the startup world was fun, the finance industry gave me some extra skills.

Here’s what I learned working in finance:

 

1. The grass is never greener.

Over the years, many of my colleagues have left finance to start their own thing or join some new age fintech that apparently has all the answers – that is, until they come up against credit risk or accidentally fund terrorism through their products and services. The grass is never greener.

“Every company, whether it’s a large bank or one you started yourself, is going to have challenges. It comes down to which flavors of challenges you like the most”

Maybe you have to be really innovative in your career but don’t mind lack of funding or small travel budgets.

Maybe you have to work with really smart people but don’t mind being in a low budget office. The people I’ve met in finance that are always chasing greener grass never seem to find it.

At some point, we can’t avoid challenges or people we don’t like – they exist in all companies whether we like it or not. Learning to deal with these facts is how I’ve stayed in finance for six years and not given up on my career.

 

2. There are mediocre people everywhere we go.

In finance, like any industry, there are mediocre people. Some of them are uneducated; some of them lack critical thinking; some of them have zero sales ability; some are afraid of customers; some of them love a good company paid breakfast for no good reason. We can’t avoid mediocre people.

“What I’ve learned through my years in finance is that it’s not that people are mediocre or dumb; it’s that everyone has different priorities”

Some people want to leave at 5:01 pm to be with their kids and that’s okay.

Just because we don’t prioritize our career and our KPIs, doesn’t mean any of us are dumb because of it. There are many levels of intelligence within a company and all are acceptable.

I’ve visited a few unique and prestigious businesses in Silicon Valley where everyone is a genius and these companies spend half their time arguing who the smartest person is in the room rather than getting down to business and solving a real problem in the world.

 

3. There are good leaders and bad ones.

Don’t get emotional about it, just spend as much time as you can with the good ones. There will be leaders you encounter who are trying it out and who’ve been given a chance. There will be other leaders you meet that are born for the role.

Everyone has the right to step up and be a leader regardless of their ability.

My career in finance has been focused on getting around the good leaders. Sometimes you’ll have to work for a bad leader and the key is to suck it up, eat shit for a while, and then leave and work for a leader you believe in.

 

4. Your career is never going to be full of highlights.

I was on the homepage of our company’s website twice in one year. Many never get this chance ever in their career and it happened to me twice in one year.

Then there was a year after that where nothing happened. There were no big milestones, no punching the air and plenty of low points involving customers.

In finance, and in the business world, it’s never going to be a back-to-back show-reel of Instagram highlights where we win every day.

There will be periods of massive growth and then there will be months and even years where nothing happens – times where we show up for work each day expecting something big to happen and it doesn’t.

 

5. The need for a side hustle.

Our career can’t always be full of highlights, which is why we need a side hustle. Think of it like another avenue that we can use to kick goals, grow and broaden your skills. For me, outside of working in finance, it became social media and blogging. Over the last five years of my finance career, I’ve hustled my face off learning somewhat non-related skills that have nothing to do with finance.

Side hustles allow us to explore our wild side. Working in finance can be quite dry and without my side hustle, I may have succumbed to suppressing my emotions, wearing a corporate mask and dressing in a suit and tie every day.

Side hustles helped me keep it real. Some days I work in jeans and a t-shirt. Other days I wear the cliché suit. My side hustle helped me live a little and get some perspective on what the finance industry was really about. The answer? Like every business, finance is about people.

 

6. Once we understand people, we’re set.

People go through a range of emotions every day. Once we understand that what’s happening in business could be entirely down to the fact they’re human, and nothing to do with business, we see the business landscape differently.

We become more compassionate to stakeholders, we treat customers with kindness and we quit thinking that we’re a freaking genius that has all the answers and if only people would listen to us the business would make 10X the profits.

Business is about people and by understanding them we can see it for what it is. Our customers are also people, and our interactions with them become easier when we come to grips with this fact.

If I were to get you to learn one thing, it would be the basics of psychology. Most of the key points can be Googled for free but the value they bring will help whether you’re in finance or any another industry.

 

7. We’re all constantly growing in secret.

I always thought that GM’s, CEO’s, etc, had it made. I always thought that they woke up each day and came to work with a killer instinct. The finance industry taught me I was wrong. The leaders we admire with those big job titles are just like you and me: they’re scared as F.

The difference is that the leaders we admire are growing in secret.

You think they have it made but when you get in their head, you realize that even with their success they suffer the same human pitfalls that you and I do. The difference is they embrace those pitfalls and take action regardless.

Even your heroes are fearful when they have to perform, but they do it anyway.

 

8. Your happiness doesn’t stay the same.

At the start of a new role in any industry, we’re loaded with energy. We come to work with new strategies and different ways to acquire customers. Then a few years go by and we become a bit negative. We see the same challenges over and over and the same people failing to take action.

This can lead to unhappiness in our career.

What working in finance has taught me is that there will be times we’re really happy with our role and other times where we are unhappy.

What we learn in the unhappy times helps us when we’re living through the happy times. If you expect to get into any industry and be blazing on fire for decades straight you’ll be sadly disappointed. One solution I’ve found is to change up my career and try new things.

Maybe you start in a sales role and end up working in product or risk. Maybe you work in customer service and end up in a strategy role.

Much of the unhappiness is tied to boredom and changing roles can help reboot our happiness at work.

 

9. Innovation is much harder than we think.

Geez, if there’s is one thing I have seen a lot of in many financial services businesses it’s innovation. So many companies have tried it and it never works. Sometimes it’s too much red tape that is put around the business or idea which ultimately suffocates the life out of any opportunity to innovate.

Other times it’s the wrong people that kill the innovation.

“Surprisingly, one thing that makes innovation really challenging is an abundance of resources”

Large businesses can afford to throw lots of money against the wall at innovation whereas startups can’t.

The limitations and budget restraints a startup has are often why they can be nimble and innovative. In the end, true innovation is damn hard. If it were easy, then many businesses would be more successful than they are.

The key is not to give up on innovation. It’s a slow process to embed innovation into the culture of a business and get results. True innovation requires a lot more failure than the leaders in the business world are often comfortable with.

It’s only by looking at what doesn’t work that we find truly innovative solutions.

 

10. It’s not about networking: it’s about helping.

Someone emailed me yesterday and said, “Hey I’d like to network with you.”

I thought to myself “Wow that sounds really silly!”

This idea that we have to network is stupid. What makes more sense is to build relationships just like we would with friends. Networking is focused too much on what we can get and what we will give in return. It’s transactional and it feels unnatural.

The subtle difference is that when we build a relationship with someone (instead of network with them) we’re not seeking anything from them. There’s no expectation and that’s where the magic lies right there.

 

11. We all experience bad publicity. It’s how we handle it.

Even monster success stories like Facebook have bad publicity. Working in finance can have some ugly moments. Not everyone is honest and there will be times where the business you work for or even your own business may face negative publicity.

No company or industry (including finance) is perfect. Businesses make mistakes just like humans do because ‘Business’ is just a label for a group of humans doing their life’s work.

Expecting the company you work for to be a perfect corporate citizen is a fantasy.

 

12. Listening to customers is not easy but it works.

Working in finance has allowed me to see my fair share of angry customers. For years, I tried to defend my position and this caused me to miss what the customer was saying.

After a while in finance, I learned that if you shut up and listen to the client, you learn much more. Sometimes they might yell at you for 30-minutes flat. Sit there and listen.

By listening, you get the chance to understand the problem fully and it gets your mind ticking with ideas. When people feel they are being properly listened to, they’re more receptive to the solutions you present for their problems.

It’s freaking revolutionary when you listen more. Not just in business but in life too.

 

13. What you have for lunch matters.

I was eating chicken nuggets in a bread roll for ages and it caused me to be sleepy in the afternoon. This killed my productivity and my desire to work effectively so I would cram all my challenging tasks into the morning.

Once I learned what a proper lunch was and began eating one every day, my energy, mood and productivity improved. I’m still getting better but what I learned is to monitor carefully what I eat if I want the energy to excel in my career. Bread, at lunchtime in particular, tends to suck away my energy later in the afternoon.

 

14. Kindness and compassion are superpowers.

Your humility separates you from the pack. Trying my best in my finance career to show compassion and be kind to people has helped me immensely. These two traits are rarer than you think.

In the business world, kindness and compassion are the glue that sticks all of the right opportunities together for you and presents them as a beautiful collage.

The reason I’ve had some cool opportunities (particularly of late) is that I’ve tried to be different instead of being like everyone else. I’ve questioned the way business works and experimented with kindness and compassion.

It turns out these two traits make people see me in a weird way. It’s almost like these two traits make me more human.

Kindness and compassion are about seeing the best in people before making assumptions that they’re out to screw you. Kindness and compassion are about believing in the power of the human species above all else.

 

15. Taking off the mask is freeing.

For the first half of my career in finance, I wore a mask. It’s hard to admit but it’s true. I used corporate language like “revenue targets” and “customer value proposition” and took a notepad to meetings to look smart. I wore the nicely ironed suit with the cute little cufflinks.

I said hello politely to everyone and was graceful. When it came to social media, I promoted the company and supported my colleagues. I told people I liked what they did even when I didn’t.

I did all of this because I thought that being fake and wearing a mask of bravery and perfection was what you had to do to succeed. I thought that’s how business land worked.

I found that all of this acting became exhausting and it was incongruent with who I really was. Deep down, I was an entrepreneur and a highly creative person that wanted to express himself.

After a string of bizarre situations – like narrowly missing cancer and seeing a few people close to me like my grandma pass away – I decided to throw away the mask.

I started dropping the odd F-Bomb. I told people politely when I didn’t like their idea. I became brutally honest with clients and stopped telling them what they wanted to hear.

All of this led to the real version of me being on display. Some people liked it and others weren’t interested.

“Either way, you can’t keep faking it till you make it at work every day because eventually, you’ll fall down from all the BS and wonder whose life you’ve been living for the last six years”

 

16. Scheduling holidays in advance provides additional motivation.

Let’s not pretend we’re 100% motivated each week at work. Some weeks will suck and that’s normal. Booking holidays in advance gives me a permanent memory of yet another thing that’s great about life: taking breaks.

The first half of my finance career involved almost no holidays. Not only did I become burnt out, but I also didn’t have as much to look forward to. Then I began booking in holidays to New Zealand, the USA and Japan. My motivation changed. I’d work harder leading up to holiday time so that I could take an even bigger break away from it all.

Holidays became like a reset button for my finance career and they gave me something else to aim for other than boring old KPIs.

 

17. Working really long hours means there’s a problem.

There have been a lot of times I’ve encountered people in finance working their butt off. I used to think it’s cool; now I see it as a problem.

If you’re working long hours, there is a problem. You’re either unproductive, distracted or under-resourced. All of these issues can be resolved and working stupidly hard is not the answer.

“Productivity is the opposite of working long hours”

 

18. You’ll have to speak in front of others.

That’s why I tell everybody to get their arse to Toastmasters and learn how to speak without having a thousand Ums and Ahs between every word. Public speaking is a basic form of communication and mastering it is how you get across your ideas, visions and tell phenomenal stories.

No matter your speaking ability in front of others, it’s time to improve it.

 

19. Most people have no idea about business so don’t feel so bad.

Yep, that’s the truth! All these people you meet in business that sound like they know what they’re talking about often don’t. They are just regurgitating something they heard or read which they thought was right.

We all pretend like business is an art and so many times it’s not what it’s made out to be. The science of business has more to do with life skills than anything else. Most books about business try and overcomplicate something that isn’t that hard.

“The greatest challenge and complexity with business is understanding its simplicity”

 

20. Change is guaranteed. Why not embrace it?

And here’s the final thing I’ll say: whether you work in finance like me or in another industry, change is guaranteed. One of these will happen to you:

–    Your industry will be disrupted if it hasn’t been already

–    Your company will go through a restructure, merger or be acquired which may cause you to lose your job

–    The business you are a part of could fail

–    Or a natural disaster or manmade event like a GFC could screw with your career

Change is guaranteed in your career so rather than avoiding it, what I’ve learned in finance is to embrace it. See the fork in the road as the greatest gift you’ve ever been given.

Welcome change with open arms otherwise it will be the kiss of death to your perfect, cookie-cutter career in whatever.

If you want to increase your productivity and learn some more valuable life hacks, then join my private mailing list on timdenning.net

Tim is best known as a long-time contributor on Addicted2Success. Tim's content has been shared hundreds of thousands of times and he has written multiple viral posts all around success, personal development, motivation, and entrepreneurship. During the day Tim works with the most iconic tech companies in the world, as an adviser, to assist them in expanding into Australia. By night, Tim coaches his students on the principles of personal development and the fundamentals of entrepreneurship. You can connect with Tim through his website www.timdenning.net

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Interviews

The Questions You Have Always Wanted To Ask A Spiritual Leader

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buddhist_boot_camp, timber hawk eye interview

It’s not often we get to sit on the floor, barefoot and in lotus position while interviewing a spiritual author whose journey and teachings have positively influenced the lives of hundreds of thousands of people.

10995998_10204532948777710_3703269667569988_nTimber Hawkeye, author of the best-selling spiritual guide ‘Buddhist Boot Camp’ offers a non-sectarian approach to being at peace with the world, both within and around us. His intention in ‘Buddhist Boot Camp’ and life is to awaken, enlighten, enrich and inspire.

Timber was kind enough to give us his time on his worldwide book tour to answer some of the questions not many get to ask him but all want to know.

Make yourself a cup of tea, light a few candles and enjoy!

 

1. What is the message behind Buddhist Boot Camp?

“If I was to incapsulate it, the message would be simple – be grateful and be kind. It’s important to understand that we create a lot of our own suffering – by becoming aware that we hold the responsibility to create our own happiness, we empower ourselves to live a more relaxed, compassionate and positive life.”

 

2. How did the book come to be?

“I never had the intention to sit down and write a book. When I moved to Hawaii, I didn’t have a place to live, I didn’t have a job lined up and I didn’t know what I was going to do – I just knew that I wanted to live a more relaxed and free life. Every month I would send a letter to my friends and family, updating them on how my simplistic and non materialistic life was turning out.

After about 8 years of continual updates, thoughts and teachings, my friend who was moved by what I wrote about, suggested that I take all those emails and letters and make them public. So that’s what ‘Buddhist Boot Camp’ is – a collection of all my journal entires, emails and letters to friends compiled into a book. That’s why every chapter is only a page long and can be read in any order.”

 

3. Is there a difference between being religious and being spiritual?

Absolutely! Organized religion provides answers for us to follow while spirituality keeps us in a place of questioning and inquiry. With spirituality we make peace with not knowing, with not having all the answers and not having only one truth. Truth within spirituality has a small ’T’ while in religion, it’s capitalized on being the universal truth above all else.

That’s why there is so much hostility between different religions – they believe their truth is the only truth and most superior to any other explanation. While spirituality leaves us in a place of searching, wonder, open mindfulness and open heartfulness to not be so quick to judge or label.”

Buddha-Quote-Becoming-Yourself

 

4. You quote the Dalai Lama saying, “Don’t try to use what you learn from Buddhism to be a Buddhist; use it to be a better whatever-you-already-are.” Can you elaborate on that?

“I don’t think a label is important at all. I am a lot of things – not only one (label) defines me. Meaning it’s not about being a buddhist, it’s about being ‘Buddha-like’ or not being Christian but being ‘Christ-like’ and that’s a really important invitation to not focus so much on the label but on the actual teachings. Living this way makes you ask yourself ‘how can my actions be inline with my values?’ because your beliefs don’t make you a better person, your behavior does. So it does matter who you are or what you want to be just be really good at it.”

 

4. You say to focus on the teachings not the teachers. What do you mean and why?

“We tend to put the ‘teachers’ of faith up on a pedestal and look up to them. Shunryū Suzuki wrote about how there are no enlightened beings, only enlightened activity and that was very empowering for me. The people we perceive to be enlightened i.e. the Dalai Lama, Jesus, Buddha, they’re people like you and I however they just made enlightened activity apart of their everyday lives.

And so by bringing ourselves up to eye level with those figures, you become empowered and confident in your abilities to become enlightened.”

 

5. Do you believe success and spirituality coexist? Typically society tells us we can only develop one or the other.

Most definitely! You need to understand that ‘typically’ the opinion of success in society is skewed. Success to me is being happy. To me spirituality is a means to happiness and so success and spirituality can very much coexist. I don’t have a lot of money however I feel like the richest man in the world because I am happy – and spirituality brings that to me. I think there would be nothing worse than being super wealthy but feeling unfulfilled and unhappy internally.”

what-we-think-we-become-buddha-quote

 

6. Meditation seems to be a buzz word lately, what is it, how do you do it and can someone with no previous experience with meditation still benefit?

Of course! You’re right, meditation is a buzz word at the moment which is a shame because with that brings assumptions – assumptions of how it should be done, what it is and who should do it. People seek out to be ‘taught’ meditation however I shy away from giving instruction because the moment you do, you’re implying there is a wrong way to meditate. I have a lot of individuals come up to me and voice that they are meditating wrong or they don’t know how to do it but in-fact there is no ‘wrong way’ of meditating. As long as the intention is there, your attempts are successful.

The whole point of meditation is to learn how to control your mind. So if you find that there is something you do which relaxes you and in which your mind doesn’t wonder – it could be jogging, hiking, gardening, doing puzzles, painting and if while you’re doing that your mind stays focused – you’re meditating. Its that simple. There’s no need to sit in full lotus position or burn incense or chant chakras – mediation is just the practice of focusing your mind.”

 

7. What’s one exercise or activity you would recommend we do starting today to lead a more positive, happy and fulfilled life?

“Keep a gratitude journal. Every single morning, make it the first thing you do – take out your journal and just start listing anything and everything you’re grateful for.  It can be as simple as “I am so grateful to be alive today” or “I am so grateful for all my friends and family” or “I am so grateful for all the opportunities I attract into my life”.

You can even download a gratitude app to your smart phone if journaling isn’t for you. What’s cool about the app is you can also document photos, videos and voice memos as well as text.

When you live and come from a place of complete gratitude, everything changes and you have no choice but to become a happier person.”

 

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Interviews

(Video) Gary Vaynerchuk’s Unforgettable Advice For Achieving Success

Joel Brown (Founder of Addicted2Success.com)

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Gary Vaynerchuk VaynerMedia

We recently caught up with the multi-millionaire entrepreneur Gary Vaynerchuk for an exclusive, one of a kind interview. Gary is an entrepreneurial wizard, with unforgettable advice for all with a humble yet electric personality and charm.

Gary was able to build his family wine business from 3 Million to 60 Million in a matter of years using creative and innovative marketing techniques, on and offline. His company “VaynerMedia” are the brains and promotional orchestrators behind some of America’s largest companies and personalities.

Gary Vaynerchuk is a world-renowned expert in Social Media and is the author of a number of New York Times best-selling books including “Crush It!“, and “The Thank You Economy“. He and is set for a third book on the way with his soon to be released, and highly anticipated “Jab, Jab, Jab, Right Hook: How to Tell Your Story in a Noisy Social World“.

 

Gary Vaynerchuk’s Unforgettable Advice For Achieving Success

 

Great Gary Vaynerchuk Quotes

“We’re not really good at knowing what we want, and we are very quick to say “this sucks”. That’s where the opportunity lies.” – Gary Vaynerchuk

“You didn’t grow up driving…you figured it out.” – Gary Vaynerchuk

Embrace what you’re good at. Lebron didn’t try to become a professor. – Gary Vaynerchuk

“Legacy is greater than currency.” – Gary Vaynerchuk

“If you live for weekends or vacations, your shit is broken.” – Gary Vaynerchuk

“We only get to play this game one time…one life.” – Gary Vaynerchuk

“In 2006, the Blockbuster board got together and said, ‘Do you know anyone using Netflix.’ …Look how that worked out. That is what happens when you put ten 80-year-old guys in a room…Be on record. Be on the right side of history. You don’t want to be the person that supported the Blockbuster decision.” – Gary Vaynerchuk

“There’s no reason in 2013, to do shit you hate. NONE.” – Gary Vaynerchuk

“A penguin cannot become a giraffe, so just be the best penguin you can be.” – Gary Vaynerchuk

 

Gary Vaynerchuk Entrepreneur Picture Quote For Success

 

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Interviews

Captain America “Chris Evans” Shares His Advice For Success and Acting

Joel Brown (Founder of Addicted2Success.com)

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Chris Evans, the actor of Captain America recently appeared on Spreecast for a live Q&A with his fans and had an awesome amount of positive energy and inspirational advice to share with his followers.

We transcribed Chis Evans great answers and advice just for you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chris Evans Inspirational Answers To Living A Successful Life

 

What’s it like being part of something so big like “The Avengers”?

Intimidating, a little overwhelming but you are overwhelmed with gratitude. When you are making it, you don’t really know it’s going to be that big, even when it comes out you forget what’s really happening.

I try to think about what I would have thought when I was 18 before I started this career and I think it would be radically different, but overtime, the more movies you make you just get used to the routine of the movies coming out, you’re in the mall, you’re in the press, you’re trying to get another job and it all becomes this piece in the puzzle of work.

I think you become a little de-sensitized; you’re like “Great! That did well, Good Job!”. You are still grateful but you’re not just sitting there like “WOW!, Look at this!, Look what I was a part of”, it doesn’t always feel that way, which is a shame, because it should and I think that’s part of what I try to remind myself of, to be appreciative.

Gratitude is the key to happiness, if you have a healthy understanding of gratitude, you can’t lose. – Chris Evans

 

What’s your favorite part of being Captain America?

chris evans captain america actorI really like playing a good super hero. Not that the other super heroes are bad, but a lot of other super heroes are tortured souls, they have demons that they’re fighting. Caps just a really good guy, apart from being a super hero and having super powers, he’s just a really good man.

Any role that you play, if you are in a head space for an extended period of time, you really have to think a certain type of way and get inside the head of a character and sometimes I play dark characters or frustrated characters and it’s negative because you are trying to tap into the parts of you that can connect to that, the parts of you from your own personal history and experience that you can identify and relate to, you have to find pieces of you that are in common.

So while playing Captain America on a daily basis, you are trying to tap into the best part of yourself, and it’s Inspiring, you want to do better, you want to do good, it’s a healthy head space to be in and I think it’s rewarding playing someone with such a good heart.

 

How do you stay true to your self without letting the fame get to your head?

I go home a lot, back to Boston. LA is a tricky place to be, and it’s not just fame that’s the thing. Whether you are famous or not you are in a business of rejection, competition, comparison and you live in your own head quite a bit, which is not a good place for anyone to be for an extended period of time.

When you are back at home, you remember your youth, you are surrounded by friends and family who don’t care if you are successful in this industry or not and your priorities shift and all of a sudden the things that truly matter, start to come back to life.

 

Do you have a quote song lyric or saying that inspires you?

I really like Eckhart Tolle, he wrote the book “The Power of Now”. I am a big fan of Buddhism, Eastern Philosophy, the notion of trying to be present in the moment, turning the third eye off and detaching from ego

Eckhart has a quote from his book called “Stillness Speaks” that just really resonated with me, enough to permanently ink my body, and it says:

“When you lose touch with your inner stillness, you lose touch with yourself, when you lose touch with yourself, you lose yourself in the world.”

And it just made so much sense to me, still does, always will. It’s something that always brings me back to being centered.

 

What book are you currently reading?

Chris-Evans-actor-captain americaIt’s a book called “The Honeymoon Effect”, by an author called Bruce Lipton, who wrote a book called “The Biology of Belief” and it’s a really clever book. It’s about how for the longest time scientists thought that your DNA was determined by your genetics and how this one guy is proving that your DNA can be affected by your thought, your emotions, your daily choices, how you interact with the world through your thinking and that it can actually change your chemistry.

So this guy wrote a book called “The Honeymoon Effect” and it’s about how we can sustain healthy relationships in our life. Not just with men and women but with all of our relations and all of our interactions throughout our life. I just love his writing.

 

Did anyone influence you to get into acting?

My older sister.

When I was younger I didn’t act in my first play until I was in 6th or 7th grade. I saw my older sister doing it and she was having a ball. We would go and see her after her plays and my parents would give her candy, and I was like “Well I want candy”. She does plays, everyone’s having a good time, she’s staying out school nights and it all sounded great. So I did a couple of plays with her at a place where she did theatre and that was it, I was hooked!

 

Are you still nervous when going up for auditions? If yes, how do you get over the nerves and perform the best you can?

Yes, I’m still nervous in auditions, but it’s a little bit easier now because with age you are able to recognize that “this isn’t everything”, “this isn’t the end of the world”, I think when you’re young you put so much importance on everything.

As you get older you realize that you will be fine and that this will not somehow stop you from being happy and that’s the goal in life, I think that everyone’s goal is to be happy. – Chris Evans

 

Top three movies you would recommend anyone watch and why?

chris-evans-capLegends of the Fall – It’s a beautiful sweeping epic about brothers, honor, war and responsibility. It’s just a fantastic movie.

I Heart Huckabees – It’s a little bit of a confusing film but I think it’s really brilliant. It’s so intelligent and so well done. There is a documentary called “What The Bleep Do We Know”, and it’s all about your chemical make up and how you can manifest your own day, and I almost feel like “I Heart Huckabees” is the fiction version of that film.

Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind – I like the message, I love the film making, and the actors are phenomenal. It’s one of those movies that is constantly entertaining.

 

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Interviews

This 16 Year Old App Creator Scored Funding From A Hong Kong Billionaire

Joel Brown (Founder of Addicted2Success.com)

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nick daloisio-summly-app


While studying at his parents house in London, Nick D’Aloisio came up with a brilliant idea to create a revolutionary app by the name of Summly which changes the way that you read your favorite websites and social media feeds. This idea scored this 16 year-old genius a flight to New York and some serious money in the bank as a result of an official partnership with the eleventh wealthiest billionaire in the world, Li Ka-Shing who will be overlooking the production and release of this app.

Read on to see how Nick D’Aloisio was able to achieve such a great feat at the fresh young age of 16.

Many young entrepreneurs say they want to create the next Facebook, 16-year-old Nick D’Aloisio wants to solve the problem social networks have created in the first place.

The teenager built an iPhone app called Summly, which automatically generates summaries in the form of bullet points to help you filter through all that information.

With more than $250,000 in seed funding from Hong Kong billionaire businessman Li Ka-shing, D’Aloisio spent the last six months in his parents’ London house building Summly.

It was Sunday at 4 a.m. London time when D’Aloisio enthusiastically IMed me over AOL Messenger to make sure the news of his app made it to my Twitter stream. He was excited that 23,000 people have downloaded the app since it launched last week.

D’Aloisio was inspired to build the app after he signed up for Twitter, and got a flood of information from AP, Reuters, and other people’s Twitter handles.

Interested in finding out more about D’Aloisio, we called him to ask him about this machine learning technology and how he balances his startup with school work. We could hear his faint Australian accent — he’s originally from Perth, Western Australia, (wow, this is where Joel Brown from Addicted2Success.com is from 😉

 

Nick D’Aloisio – The Boy Genius Of Summly

 

Interview With Nick D’Aloisio

Boonsri Dickinson: How do you see the future of search and the Internet?

Nick D’Aloisio:  Consumers want information instantaneously and the search interface needs to accommodate this.

We don’t need more social networks. The new wave of technology will now stop encouraging content creation. Twitter and Facebook is enough…we have too much information. We need to try to filter the content and make it more digestible. Zite and Flipboard attempt to provide the user with the content.

We want people to use Summly once they have found content they are interested in or know what they are searching for.

BD: So how did the app evolve into what it is today?

Nick: Six months ago, we released something called Trimit. It was about content creation. It was a more gimmicky app, where you’d input an article and summarize to 140 characters for Twitter or other restrictions for Tumblr, Facebook, and email. But I found that people were using for consuming content.

Trimit taught me people want content consumption tools not content creation. Now with Summly, you can have a computer to aid that process.

BD: What’s the market for it?

Nick: It’s Cliff Notes for a mobile device. It takes a second to return any search result.

It’s a bit magical. People don’t believe what it can do, then they have a “wow” moment. You can share the summary. You can quickly evaluate the content now.

In the future, it can be applied to email. It’s easy to train it for colloquial language used in email. And eventually it can be used in other areas such as enterprise, consumer markets, and education. We will probably license the technology though monthly fees.

BD: How did you learn to program at age 12?

Nick: Books. C For Dummies. Online Tutorials. Trial and Error.

The first app I built was called Facemood when I was 14. It automatically deduced the mood of a Facebook friend using their latest Facebook status.

Even now, I’m not that confident. As I said I prefer the graphical/product aspect.

BD: What do your classmates think of you?

ND: I’m in year 11 here. I just turned 16 in November.  I hope they just think I’m a nice guy. You wouldn’t know I do this stuff. I’m really happy with the response I’ve been getting. People are amazed.

With all that, I don’t feel like I need to change my life in any way. I play sport — rugby and cricket. And I go out.

I work on the app when I can from like 9-11 pm. And on Sundays. Between school work. It’s pretty hectic.

BD: Who inspires you?

ND: Anyone who is crazy enough to create what’s in their mind. Steve Jobs for his obsession with attention to detail and his advice on failure and success. I’m inspired by designers and typography designers. And innovators like Sergey Brin and Larry Page, the founders of Google, and Jack Dorsey and the other founders of Twitter.

BD: What’s next for you?

ND: I still have three years left of schooling and plan to continue with my education into university, where I hope to study a combination of philosophy and economics, and perhaps continue learning Mandarin. I learn Mandarin because I’m interested in Chinese culture and enjoy languages.

 

Now, check out more about the app in this video:

Introduction Of Summly

 

Interview By Boonsri Dickinson from BusinessInsider.com

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