Connect with us

Startups

5 Reasons Why You Should Start a Startup Right Now

Published

on

Spanish Startups - Angel Navarree:Bloomberg News files

If you have been thinking for a while about doing a startup, the time is now.

Maybe you thought you couldn’t or you needed a lot of money, but in reality, you really don’t. It’s never been cheaper to start a business and test the idea before going and putting all your time into it.

I remember thinking back in the early 2000’s that maybe most things had been done on the internet in terms of retail, which could have been true, but turned out to be incorrect. Just because it’s been done doesn’t mean that it can’t be done again, better. Around the same time that I had this thought I remember being offered the opportunity to distribute coffee pods and thinking everyone would only ever buy freshly roasted beans.

Coffee pods are now one of the fastest selling consumables around so it’s not always easy to pick trends, nor should you just focus on trends. It needs to be a mix of good research and something you can see yourself being involved with.

Before you make your mind up that most things are done, I urge you to think about all the things you buy in your own life, is each transaction 10/10? If you’re like me it’s probably far from it. Therein lies the opportunity for you.

Below are five reasons why I believe you should start a Startup now!

 

1. The age of disruption is here

No longer will a lot of us put up with substandard industries. Taxis are a classic example where for years it has been difficult to book one, go where you want, seek accurate directions, have a friendly driver and ride in a clean car. The people have spoken and now we have Uber and other competitors coming into the market. We are going to see this keep happening to companies and industries that fail to innovate. Even large companies like Kodak don’t exist anymore because of a lack of innovation, yet a company like Go Pro can disrupt the market, and make billions, by designing a simple camera that can be used anywhere.

Culture KingsLook at Culture Kings as another example, you would think that America has done Hip Hop clothing to death, but Culture Kings showed that there was still plenty of room for new entrants to the market. I should point out that the business started at a local market on the weekend. Don’t underestimate popup stores and market stores as a great way to test your product.

So often, I see business owners try their idea out at one of these locations and give up too easily, but the trick is that once you build a small customer base and prove that your product has some demand, take the next step and build an online store. It’s the step that most of these small businesses never take seriously and it’s what made Culture Kings so successful.

 

2. Quality advice is needed like never before

People are crying out for quality advice all the time because there is now, so much variety with our economies becoming more global than ever. Whether it’s managing people’s finances or finding out how to be healthy, it’s still so hard to get unbiased advice. The businesses that can master this will be successful in this new age.

If you look online for health products it can be a minefield of finding out exactly what works and what doesn’t, and a lot of the time the claims can’t be proven. New businesses are popping up all the time and are now trying to become trusted advisors, rather than sales people because they know that quality advice and the truth will often determine whether a sale is won in this new era.

So many of us are tired of the used car salesman trying to sell whatever car he can, for the highest price, so he can make the biggest commission. The average person now is so much savvier. The answer to quality advice is to take advantage of the internet and help to inform your prospects with quality content, videos and other rich media. Not so long ago this was quite a challenge, but now it can be done quite easily, and at very little, to no cost. Whilst you could argue that this capability has been around for a while it’s only now, thanks to smart phones, that consumers are using technology even more, to get the right advice.

Even baby boomers are now using smartphones with Google Search.

How can your startup take advantage of this?

 

3. It’s never been an easier time to find your mastermind group

Technology has made it even easier for us to connect with people. Initially, sites like Facebook were only for the under 30’s but now most of our parents are on it too.

LinkedIn has also exploded and it’s very rare these days to find professionals that are not on the platform.

This means that once you have your vision laser focused; you can begin by attracting the mastermind group you will need to support you (no great business can be built alone). Finding people that can help your business case is crucial and the beauty of Social Media is that it will help you find people in niches rather than just business people in general.

When you have found a potential candidate, I don’t recommend that you only communicate via Social Media. I think Social Media is a great way to become top of mind and at least intro yourself, but try to do the rest with a face-to-face meeting or a video call via Skype / Facetime for overseas candidates. If you can, try and record this video call (with permission of course) so that you can go back and reference them later on.

Many startups make the mistake of trying to do everything online and often a lot more can be achieved in person, and the cost of an airfare is worth every cent for the right person – don’t let the fast moving tech age fool you of this.

Startup Quote Wasting Time 

4. Poor service still exists

How many times do all of us go to an eating-place and experience poor service or an ordinary meal? For me, it’s still happening now and then. There are so many hospitality businesses that open and close because they don’t understand what’s going to make them successful.

I remember going to a takeaway shop a few weeks ago and getting the bare minimum. I had to pour my own glass of water, get my own cutlery and ask for them to get me a serviette from behind the counter. It sounds like a few small things, but it shows that the customer experience has not been thought of and that they are not trying to impress me or make it easy for me to do business with them.

A business like Fonda Mexican has become so successful because they get the formula for success. You need to try and be different, provide outstanding service, simplify the menu and innovate. If you put yourself in the minds of your clients and you ask people for their feedback you really can’t go wrong, yet most businesses don’t do this, so they struggle to continually have to find new clients and waste money on expensive advertising / giveaways.

The other area to look at is the large retailers.

I recently bought an iPhone 6 from an Apple store and another one from a large retailer. The Apple store went above and beyond to make sure I knew what I was getting and was in love with the product. The sales person was enthusiastic, knowledgeable and never left my side to check stock or take the payment. Once I was done they then set the phone up for me on the spot. The total time for this transaction was about 10 minutes although I could have taken as long as I liked to make a decision.

Comparing this experience to the large retailer was completely different. The sales person at the store had no passion for the product, knew nothing about it, asked me for ID to make sure I wasn’t a criminal and wasn’t sure if they had stock. Once they confirmed they had stock they then needed to get manager approval, as there had been a high amount of staff theft of iPhone 6’s. The total transaction time was 45 minutes and there was hardly anyone in the store.

The reason I tell you this story is not to complain, but demonstrate to you the abundance of opportunity that lies before you if you decide to see it.

 

5. Most eCommerce sites are still so primitive

If you compare your retail experience to buying from an online store, there is still such a massive gap. Most eCommerce stores still have very limited product descriptions, unreliable stock levels and no quick way for their clients to be assisted.

If you want to see a site that has nailed product presentation, (it’s almost as good as holding it in the store) check out Bellroy.

The product range is small, descriptive and it tells you exactly what you want to know. Again they are one of the few, so there is still so much room for disruption. Kogan is another monster business that showed social proof when buying, is fundamental to making a sale of a product. A lot of websites still give you that empty feeling of “Am I the only one that’s ever brought this?”

Tim Denning and Ruslan Kogan | StartupGrind (Melbourne)

Kogan shows you in real time, people buying their products, so that you have social proof that you are not alone.

Even something like reviews, which have been around for a while, is still massively under-utilized. So many products I see still don’t have online reviews on them or very few. You then go to Youtube and find that there might be one or two videos demonstrating the product and the quality is not great.

There are more and more private people doing reviews of products and getting paid in the form of affiliate marketing. Again, there is a lot of opportunities to add this ingredient into the mix and launch a really cool site.

The key is obviously to pick something that you’re passionate about otherwise when you hit your first roadblock; you will struggle to find the momentum to keep moving forward. The time for startups is now!

 

GET OUT THERE, GET AMONGST IT AND GET EXCITED!

Tim is best known as a long-time contributor on Addicted2Success. Tim's content has been shared hundreds of thousands of times and he has written multiple viral posts all around success, personal development, motivation, and entrepreneurship. During the day Tim works with the most iconic tech companies in the world, as an adviser, to assist them in expanding into Australia. By night, Tim coaches his students on the principles of personal development and the fundamentals of entrepreneurship. You can connect with Tim through his website www.timdenning.net or through his Facebook.

Advertisement
8 Comments

8 Comments

  1. Tim

    Apr 14, 2015 at 10:08 pm

    Hi Tim,
    Great article. I have been racking my brain of late looming for ways to create a startup out of an already existing family retail business. I feel that there is a niche market that we are not tapping into yet and with a little innovation we could increase sales and receive more feedback from clients. I’m trying to create an engaging social media environment around the business so that customers feel that the are not just clients but part of a club.

    • Tim Denning

      Apr 23, 2015 at 11:04 am

      Tim love the way that you are thinking, and you can definitely achieve it with a family business. Your job is even easier than most because you already have a platform with a customer base. Think to yourself, what can you do that would make your customers love you and tell all their friends.

  2. Tim Denning

    Feb 3, 2015 at 10:29 am

    Thanks for reaching out Tasia all the way from the Carribean (one of my favourite spots) I’m glad the article got you thinking. Don’t let the word startup bother you as it’s all positive. It used to give me a weird feeling too until I realised that it means you have a massive advantage. Startups are able to pivot quickly, innovate and run ideas at a very low cost. Having worked for a large company, I now appreciate how important this is. Big companies just can’t operate like a startup so they can’t be nearly as innovative.

    Bad service equals a massive opportunity for you so don’t see it as a negative at all. Keep in touch and let us know how your startup journey goes.

    Much Respect

  3. Tasia

    Feb 2, 2015 at 4:31 pm

    Hi Tim,

    Whenever I hear the word Startup, I get panicky (ask me why I can’t tell you).

    Your post shows me the error of my thinking. I love the insights and it brings to mind the many ways down here in the Caribbean where improvements are sorely needed to provide better service in a lot of areas.

    Thanks for the post and I’ll certainly refer to it as I ruminate on a few ideas circulating in my head.

  4. Jane Pryor

    Jan 26, 2015 at 4:27 am

    Hi Tim.

    Thank you for your article and insights into startups now.

    Funnily enough, it’s Australia Day today (26 January) and we took the family out for a drive and a lunch near the bay. I booked online and got a confirmation emailed to me within 30 minutes. When we arrived, however, they not only did not have our booking, made an explanation (excuse) as to why this was (the receptionist is only part time – not our problem) and seated us inside, away from the entertainment and seabreeze. I queried whether we could sit outside until those people arrived but was told a firm “no”, not possible, and even received some, what I would only call, an affronted reaction from the staff member that I was questioning this.
    Our meals were served timely but all but one meal was poor quality and three of us didn’t finish our meal.

    I’m astonished that, at such a city iconic venue, that the establishment can rely on such poor service and continue to make a profit. Imagine if a few things were improved: booking service; on site personality; quality of food; opportunity for feedback.

    My point to this is that good ol’ customer service seems to be well and truly on the back burner for many businesses and that, if they’re not careful and sensible, will lose out to places like the local fish and chip shop who have people with personality and caring.

    Not that I want to be in the hospitality business, but, from my example above, if there was another similar business to open up nearby and to include the attributable improvements I’ve mentioned above, there is no reason why they shouldn’t outperform this original restaurant.

    I’m taking onboard your suggestions to apply to my own experience and taking a well thought out chance; and jumping in.
    Cheers for now and happy intrepreneuring.

    Jane

    • Tim Denning

      Feb 2, 2015 at 7:28 am

      Thanks for taking the time to reply Jane, I couldn’t agree with you more. Bad service is everywhere and as long as you have the mindset that this creates opportunity, you will do well.

      If you put customers first and you try and add value to them, you will become a magnet for success. At the same time don’t make the mistake of trying to sign up everyone. Focus on good quality clients that bring you a good return so that you can have the resources to provide them with outstanding quality and service.

  5. Tim Denning

    Jan 20, 2015 at 9:23 am

    Would love to hear where you made your mistakes Mary if you’re willing to share.

  6. mary okungu

    Jan 20, 2015 at 5:49 am

    very tourching stories indeed i now realize whare i made mistake and the reason as to why have not been successefull,thank you for sharing with us.mary from kenya

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Startups

5 Steps to Regaining Stability After Your Million Dollar Business Idea Fails

Published

on

business failure

You probably must have heard that seven out of ten businesses fail within the first ten years of their conception. While this revelation might seem alarming, the fact remains that business failure is like a cake from which every entrepreneur must have, at least, a bite.

The common assumption of most entrepreneurs is that businesses with no solid ideas are the ones that fail. So instead of taking their foot off the ground, they spend years trying to come up with the “million-dollar” idea they believe won’t fail.

No doubt, bad business ideas lead to failure often. But the truth is, business failure isn’t a tale that only organizations with bad ideas tell. Because, in most cases, good ideas fail too. In fact, several good ideas executed by some of the world’s most successful business leaders in the early stages of their careers, failed.

Bill Gates, co-founder of Microsoft Corporation, once started Traf-O-Data alongside Paul Allena data-analyzing company that failed. Steve Jobs, while he was CEO at Apple, launched Apple Lisa, Apple III and other great products that failed. Henry Ford, the founder of Ford Motor Company, earlier launched two automotive companies that failed.

Although these entrepreneurs encountered failure, they never allowed it prevent them from working towards success.

In case your good business idea has failed and you’re about quitting, below are five actionable steps you can take to regain stability:

1. Accept the truth

Many entrepreneurs are suppressed by their failures because they keep running from the truth. When a business idea fails, it’s pointless shading the truth or shying away from the reality. A failed business idea is a failed business idea, period! Microsoft, for example, came into existence as a result of Gates’ ability to accept the truththat Traf-O-Data had failed.

Steve Jobs, co-founder of Apple, once said, “If I try my best and fail, well I have tried my best.” Once business owners learn to accept the bitter truth that their excellent business idea has failed and cease investing their time, money, and energy trying to breathe life into it, getting back on track will become less difficult.

“The world won’t care about your self-esteem. The world will expect you to accomplish something BEFORE you feel good about yourself.” – Bill Gates

2. Take responsibility

One of the many wrong steps business owners and executives take after their great business idea fails is playing the blame game—that is, giving excuses for their failure. Whether you head an Inc. 500 company or a mom-and-pop store, you have to take responsibility when your good business idea fails.

Taking responsibility, in the case of a large organization, doesn’t mean avoiding to discipline anyone whose incompetence directly led to the failure. Rather, it means spending less time on passing blames and giving excuses, and focusing more on the way forward. Instead of shifting blame when a good business idea fails, take responsibility for the failure and ensure you prevent similar failures from reoccurring.

3. Ask “why?”

For every failure a business experiences, there’s always a cause. Most times, good ideas fail due to poor execution, improper planning, wrong managerial decisions and the absence of professional hands. Knowing every failure has a cause, you need to ask yourself, “Why did ‘X’ business idea fail?”

Bill Gates, one of the world’s most successful business leaders, once said, “It’s fine to celebrate success, but it is more important to heed the lessons of failure.” When you know the cause of the failure, you will be able to extract a lesson or two from the unpleasant event. These lessons, in the future, can serve as a mapguiding you on the pathway to success when you embark on a similar quest.

4. Avoid negativity

In entrepreneurship, failure is one ingredient that makes the journey worthwhile. Therefore when a business idea fails, entrepreneurs are left with only two options: to come up with a new idea or modify the existing one, and get going. Although this is the norm, many entrepreneurs never make it back up because of one thing: Negativity.

Negativity (or pessimism) alone can ravage any entrepreneur’s business journey. Embracing self-doubt, spending time with toxic individuals, and submitting one’s self to chance are loopholes through which negativity steps in to ruin an entrepreneur’s career. To gain stability after your good business idea fails, you must abstain from pessimistic thinking and build relationships with positive, like-minded individuals.

“Defeat is a state of mind; no one is ever defeated until defeat has been accepted as a reality.” – Bruce Lee

5. Take the punches and keep moving

The ability to get up and keep moving after experiencing multiple failures is what differentiates real entrepreneurs from “aspiring” entrepreneurs. Or borrowing Steve Jobs’ words, “I am convinced that about half of what separates successful entrepreneurs from the unsuccessful ones is pure perseverance.”

You are an entrepreneur. One with a goal, vision, and mission. You didn’t start out as an entrepreneur believing the journey would be filled with rainbows and unicorns, did you? When your best business idea fails, remember that you are an entrepreneur. And in entrepreneurship, throwing in the towel sooner than necessaryeven after experiencing failureis against the rules of the game.

How do you recover from a set back?  Comment below!

Continue Reading

Startups

‘Computer Says No’ Type People Are The Problem.

Published

on

Saying no without listening is the problem.

It’s the cause of why we fail to innovate. It’s a form of arrogance that focuses all of our energy on our own selfish thoughts. This never-ending pursuit of one’s self-importance is the cause of everything, as a human race, we do not want.

 

Ciggies, Panadol and Coke Zero enter the room.

Last week, I had a profitable business idea squashed by one of those computer says no types that this article is based on.

She entered the room.
Before I opened my mouth, she looked like she was pissed off and acted superior.

She then placed her half-smoked packet of ciggies, her full bottle of Coke Zero (who’s fooled by this so-called ‘healthy option’) and a fresh packet of Panadol on the table. If that’s not a cocktail of problems right, there then I don’t know what is – back to the story.

I explained the business proposition, and before I finished, she said no.

“That’s not how we do things.”
“Let’s create a project.”
“Let’s write a strategy.”
“We don’t have the resources.”

When is it ever the right time? When will we ever have the right strategy? From what I’ve seen, a project equals taking our time and wasting our competitive advantage. Success is about moving quickly. Success is about listening. Success is about trying new things and not following the old way.

 

It’s the lack of emotion that is the problem.

This story above was disappointing for the fact that there was no emotion. It wasn’t two people having a conversation; it was one person being unemotional like a computer and spitting out a generic answer, while the other person just wanted to be heard.

 

No one has all the answers.

The computer says no mindset suggests that there is a hierarchy. It suggests that some people should be worshipped while others should bow down. This old model of the business world died a long time ago.

“We’re all global citizens that are equal and deserve to be heard”

The very answers these computer says no people think they have are what needs to change. Their answers are built on old models and need an upgrade. There is no one answer. The solution to different problems is never the same and the solutions are forever changing. The market is forever changing. People are forever changing. Nothing is static. Everything is in flux.

 

They don’t listen; they just say no.

Listening is where everything begins. You’ll never be successful unless you learn to listen. Listening is a skill and it’s forgotten way too often. Less is more. Understanding the problem and being brilliant is in the listening.

“Most of the answers you seek are hidden in the dialogue you’re currently ignoring”

 

Next time the computer says no, tell the computer you’re only accepting yes.

Let’s not make this a whinge session. What can we do about these computer says no people? Tell them that you’re only accepting yes. Be relentless. Challenge them and make them feel uncomfortable. Don’t allow yourself to be ignored. Do all of this with respect.

Part of what causes these no responses is laziness. It’s easier to say no than it is to exuberate energy and try to say yes. Now I’m not saying the Panadol, Coke Zero and ciggies were the entire cause (or am I?) but energy sure plays a part. When we’re living in a state of perpetual tiredness, we make dumb, computer says no, decisions.

You do have energy though. Your energy can break through the no’s and somehow find a way to get to a yes. Don’t accept defeat. Refuse to fail.

 

It’s easy to say no.

No requires very little thought. No says “Let’s just remain the same and not change anything.”

No is the easy way out for these computer says no people. Don’t let them win so easily.

See their weakness for saying yes and challenge it.

 

Make them work for their no.

Get them to give you clear and articulate reasons as to why the answer is no. Don’t let them get away with being lazy. Force factual evidence to be provided. Bring other people in to support your rationale for them to say yes. Go up the line. Speak to their boss if you have to.

Whatever you do, make them work for their no. Don’t allow them to get away with being lazy.

Don’t let the human race fail to progress because someone is not willing to use critical thinking and spend time tackling issues head-on.

 

No doesn’t mean no.

No means not right now.
No means I’m scared.
No means I don’t understand.
No means I might be threatened by you.

Try to find the true meaning of why you’re being told no. Computer says no type people are often fearful and scared of uncertainty. They look for proven ways rather than going into the shadows and searching for the unknown – also known as a new approach.

 

All is not lost.

These people can be changed. We can change their mindset. All of us need to be part of the solution to stamp out this epidemic. Pointing out the problem is not enough; we must empower each other to be part of the solution.

 

***Final Thought***

Computer says no people are tearing apart good ideas. They’re preventing innovation and they must be stopped. You have the power to force them to change and to listen. It begins and ends with each one of us not allowing this mediocrity in our communities, companies and social lives to continue on.

I declare Computer Say’s No Behaviour unacceptable.

If you want to increase your productivity and learn some more valuable life hacks, then join my private mailing list on timdenning.net

Continue Reading

Startups

Process And Red Tape Does Not Equal Progress.

Published

on

The corporate world has taught me the truth about process and red tape:

“Process creates people who follow it and believe they are superior for doing so. The reality is that the people who question the process are the true heroes”

Obviously, some process is needed, but the traditional way makes no sense.

Here’s how to rethink process:

 

Most processes lack critical thinking.

Ask yourself “Why are we following this process?”

Modern business requires you to think and know why you do what you do. Just because it’s the way it’s always been done, does not make it’s functional or practical. My grandpa’s horse and cart was functional back in the 1920’s and today it’s a useless pile of junk.

Critical thinking is needed with respect to “process.” Don’t become a process sook.

 

A lot of processes are kept beyond their expiry date.

The challenge is that the digital world is moving so fast. The moment you invent a process, the customer starts to do something different. That’s why a flexible process with minimal framework is ideal.

The process must move with the market and the people who use the process.

” Too much process turns people into critics that ridicule anyone who goes ‘outside of process’ “

Process can quickly become a means for people to become critical and insult each other. Going outside of the process to make business happen (which pays the bills) is not something that should be looked down upon. Instead, when this happens, we need to ask why the process wasn’t suitable.

 

Every process should regularly be reviewed.

Okay, so you have to have a process for something. It needs to be continually challenged.

Why do we have this process?
What do customers think of it?
Is it still timely?
Are there any steps in the process we can remove?

Out of date processes are destroying your business and if you are working for a company that has to follow them, you become de-motivated quickly.

There’s always another business you can work for that doesn’t have the same dumb process, so keeping people becomes hard as well thanks to too much process.

 

Rounding up things together like sheep.

You can’t round people and businesses up like a flock of sheep.

No two people are the same.
No two businesses are the same.

Unfortunately, very few business and people are the same. I rejoice that fact otherwise life would suck big time. We’d become even more bored and spend more time looking at a not so smartphone.

Embrace individuality. Let people think outside the process box. You’ll be amazed by the results. You might even build the next Facebook by doing so. When I see a black cat, with a white spot on it’s back, walk under a ladder, I shout out loud and do a dance!

Praise the heavens for the fact that the black cat is busting an ancient superstition. It’s time to sing Superstitious by Stevie wonder and get back in the groove.

 

Process kills innovation.

For the record, I hate the word innovation. It’s a buzz word that is frequently used and rarely practiced. Innovation can only thrive when we have a growth mindset. A growth mindset says that nobody is right and nobody is wrong. We’re all right in our own way and we are all continuously learning.

You can’t have an innovative culture or workplace if you suffocate it with the lethal gas that is too much process. Process turns dreamers (innovators) into deranged zombies that can’t wait to get home and get drunk.

 

Imagine if Uber followed the process.

That’s right: What if Uber did what every other taxi company did? We’d have the same broken system that doesn’t serve the customer or the driver. We’d never know what it was like to book a service, and then walk away without pulling our wallet out.

 

Frustration with “the process” is good.

You know why I love it when people get pissed off at too much process? Because it creates the seed of entrepreneurs. Entrepreneurs can’t take too much process and they end up proving people wrong by going and doing something better themselves.

If people didn’t get pissed off by out of date process, then we wouldn’t have a lot of the tech giants we have today. So again, don’t let the negativity take over. Take the negativity that is process and go and fix the problem, and charge money for it.

For those that do, I look forward to your email in the future that says thank you. Your welcome for these words I write which encourage you to stand up to BS process that makes no sense. Rebels move the world forward with their passion and they spit in the face of being suppressed by mediocrity.

We all have potential.
We can all do crazy, awesome stuff.
Don’t let too much process ruin the fun party!

 

In conclusion….

Process kills dreams.
Process kills companies.
Process kills ideas.
Process kills people and their potential.

If you want to increase your productivity and learn some more valuable life hacks, then join my private mailing list on timdenning.net

Continue Reading

Startups

How To Create Exponential Growth In Your Company Using This Simple Strategy

Published

on

company growth

When it comes to business, the more of it you have, the easier it is for the business owner to see where the business will be in five, ten, even fifteen years. Good business is what we want, but great business is what we dream of having.

If you’re an entrepreneur with a startup company, or maybe you’re an old pro cultivating business every day, there’s one thing we can all agree on. Having more business and creating more success within our business would be a great end result at the end of this year.

But what is the secret? It seems some people blast out of the entrepreneurial gate and people immediately gravitate to them, while others get lost in the crowd and struggle for six months before finally giving up their dream. While this is a sad depiction of what could be in store for your business, it doesn’t have to be like this.

Enter Rohan Sheth, a self-made success who used to work the counter at McDonald’s but now runs the CEO desk at Rohan Sheth Consulting, a multi-million dollar company helping entrepreneurs realize their dreams. If anyone knows the secret of creating exponential growth within their company, it’s Mr. Sheth, and he explains these well-known, but little practiced strategies that can explode your business.

1. Stay Consistent

First and foremost, Mr. Sheth described consistency as one of the key parts in building a successful business. He says, “Legitimate consistency with engagement for your business will show relevancy with your audience and allow them the opportunity to connect with you on a personal level.”

Being consistent within your target audience begins to build a sense of trust and expertise within your community and it’s important to understand what your target market wants and needs and sticking to a plan which delivers on these needs daily/weekly.

If your priority on social media marketing is your Instagram account, then make a plan and stick with it. Post consistent and valuable content which will plant a seed within your congregation making you stand out from the rest of your competitors. Remember, if you’re constantly selling to them, they’re not going to listen. It takes perfect timing to understand when to sell and when to continually deliver content that will meet their needs.

Eventually, your consistency will begin to be shared by your audience. When this happens, they will begin expecting something from you at certain times throughout the day or week. For instance, let’s say you have a YouTube channel where you always upload a helpful video every Friday. After you have consistently shown your viewers you can deliver on what you promise, they will pounce on your video’s every time you upload them.

“Success isn’t always about greatness. It’s about consistency. Consistent hard work leads to success. Greatness will come.” – Dwayne Johnson

2. Build the Relationship

In the online world of business it can be very tempting and even easy to fall prey to data and statistics. Sometimes you may even find yourself pouring over data sheets and getting excited when a line goes up or down.

While statistics are a reliable way to grow your business, it’s not the way to build a personal relationship with that one person who needs your services. No one person is unimportant. Each individual within your reach has the power and the potential to reach hundreds, even thousands of their friends when you take the time to show them you really care. So how does this part happen?

This is when you get down and dirty and jump in the mix in your social channels and your email list. Reply to comments, answer questions, reach out and offer your services and advice when you see someone in need. These are all barrier breakers in the relationship building process and can mean the difference of someone walking away and becoming a high value brand ambassador for your business later.

I realize once your business grows on social media, you will begin to have more people than you’ll know what to do with. Nonetheless, it’s still important to reach out as much as possible and show the face behind the brand. When your audience does start to get large, think about creating opportunities with your channels or pages which can provide a sense of belonging to your target market.

For instance, give the mass of followers you have retained a name. This will make them feel like they are part of the bigger picture and will draw them in and help the relationship building process grow between them and your brand.

3. Solve a Problem For The Masses

In order to encourage exponential growth within your company you need to be making use of the technology around you.

Technology is enabling organizations to reach entirely new markets in massive and viral ways. As the world’s population approaches 7.5 billion, companies and organizations with exponential business models can help close the gap between our growing population and the resources they need.

Many companies start with one core offering to customers to serve one need—like Uber and personal transportation—then expand their services to meet other needs, like UberEATS or UberHEALTH.

Mr. Sheth says to learn about your audience through the data and statistics and develop a plan which can solve these bigger problems they are having. This is more like relationship building on steroids and works well when you have a larger audience. Because the audience is larger, when you do solve the problem, they feel the need to tell their friends about it and here comes the flood of new visitors to your business.

“There was never a night or a problem that could defeat sunrise or hope.” – Bernard Williams

In Conclusion

Every entrepreneur wants to realize their dream of owning a successful business which can touch the hearts, minds, and wallets of every person in their target market. But you cannot do that until you have a plan which will keep you and your team on track. Mr. Sheth’s strategies can help you develop these techniques and when you apply and tweak them according to your personal goals you will start to see your business growing exponentially within your niche.

Is it your goal to own a business or grow the business you’re currently in? If so, share with us in the comments how you are going about it so we can help everyone.

Continue Reading

Trending

Success Advice

10 Things We Can Learn From the Incredible Steve Jobs

Published

on

Steve Jobs

Steven Paul Jobs was one of the greatest visionaries and pioneers of the 21st century. He wasn’t an engineer, did not completed his college degree, yet he was able to turnaround the near-bankrupt Apple into the most valuable brand in the world. He not only transformed one industry but several others such as mobile phones, computers, and movies. (more…)

Katherine Dilworth is a wife, mother and a blogger and she writes on Caseydilworth.com, this blog provides exclusive information on Snoring.

Advertisement
8 Comments

8 Comments

  1. Tim

    Apr 14, 2015 at 10:08 pm

    Hi Tim,
    Great article. I have been racking my brain of late looming for ways to create a startup out of an already existing family retail business. I feel that there is a niche market that we are not tapping into yet and with a little innovation we could increase sales and receive more feedback from clients. I’m trying to create an engaging social media environment around the business so that customers feel that the are not just clients but part of a club.

    • Tim Denning

      Apr 23, 2015 at 11:04 am

      Tim love the way that you are thinking, and you can definitely achieve it with a family business. Your job is even easier than most because you already have a platform with a customer base. Think to yourself, what can you do that would make your customers love you and tell all their friends.

  2. Tim Denning

    Feb 3, 2015 at 10:29 am

    Thanks for reaching out Tasia all the way from the Carribean (one of my favourite spots) I’m glad the article got you thinking. Don’t let the word startup bother you as it’s all positive. It used to give me a weird feeling too until I realised that it means you have a massive advantage. Startups are able to pivot quickly, innovate and run ideas at a very low cost. Having worked for a large company, I now appreciate how important this is. Big companies just can’t operate like a startup so they can’t be nearly as innovative.

    Bad service equals a massive opportunity for you so don’t see it as a negative at all. Keep in touch and let us know how your startup journey goes.

    Much Respect

  3. Tasia

    Feb 2, 2015 at 4:31 pm

    Hi Tim,

    Whenever I hear the word Startup, I get panicky (ask me why I can’t tell you).

    Your post shows me the error of my thinking. I love the insights and it brings to mind the many ways down here in the Caribbean where improvements are sorely needed to provide better service in a lot of areas.

    Thanks for the post and I’ll certainly refer to it as I ruminate on a few ideas circulating in my head.

  4. Jane Pryor

    Jan 26, 2015 at 4:27 am

    Hi Tim.

    Thank you for your article and insights into startups now.

    Funnily enough, it’s Australia Day today (26 January) and we took the family out for a drive and a lunch near the bay. I booked online and got a confirmation emailed to me within 30 minutes. When we arrived, however, they not only did not have our booking, made an explanation (excuse) as to why this was (the receptionist is only part time – not our problem) and seated us inside, away from the entertainment and seabreeze. I queried whether we could sit outside until those people arrived but was told a firm “no”, not possible, and even received some, what I would only call, an affronted reaction from the staff member that I was questioning this.
    Our meals were served timely but all but one meal was poor quality and three of us didn’t finish our meal.

    I’m astonished that, at such a city iconic venue, that the establishment can rely on such poor service and continue to make a profit. Imagine if a few things were improved: booking service; on site personality; quality of food; opportunity for feedback.

    My point to this is that good ol’ customer service seems to be well and truly on the back burner for many businesses and that, if they’re not careful and sensible, will lose out to places like the local fish and chip shop who have people with personality and caring.

    Not that I want to be in the hospitality business, but, from my example above, if there was another similar business to open up nearby and to include the attributable improvements I’ve mentioned above, there is no reason why they shouldn’t outperform this original restaurant.

    I’m taking onboard your suggestions to apply to my own experience and taking a well thought out chance; and jumping in.
    Cheers for now and happy intrepreneuring.

    Jane

    • Tim Denning

      Feb 2, 2015 at 7:28 am

      Thanks for taking the time to reply Jane, I couldn’t agree with you more. Bad service is everywhere and as long as you have the mindset that this creates opportunity, you will do well.

      If you put customers first and you try and add value to them, you will become a magnet for success. At the same time don’t make the mistake of trying to sign up everyone. Focus on good quality clients that bring you a good return so that you can have the resources to provide them with outstanding quality and service.

  5. Tim Denning

    Jan 20, 2015 at 9:23 am

    Would love to hear where you made your mistakes Mary if you’re willing to share.

  6. mary okungu

    Jan 20, 2015 at 5:49 am

    very tourching stories indeed i now realize whare i made mistake and the reason as to why have not been successefull,thank you for sharing with us.mary from kenya

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Startups

5 Steps to Regaining Stability After Your Million Dollar Business Idea Fails

Published

on

business failure

You probably must have heard that seven out of ten businesses fail within the first ten years of their conception. While this revelation might seem alarming, the fact remains that business failure is like a cake from which every entrepreneur must have, at least, a bite.

The common assumption of most entrepreneurs is that businesses with no solid ideas are the ones that fail. So instead of taking their foot off the ground, they spend years trying to come up with the “million-dollar” idea they believe won’t fail.

No doubt, bad business ideas lead to failure often. But the truth is, business failure isn’t a tale that only organizations with bad ideas tell. Because, in most cases, good ideas fail too. In fact, several good ideas executed by some of the world’s most successful business leaders in the early stages of their careers, failed.

Bill Gates, co-founder of Microsoft Corporation, once started Traf-O-Data alongside Paul Allena data-analyzing company that failed. Steve Jobs, while he was CEO at Apple, launched Apple Lisa, Apple III and other great products that failed. Henry Ford, the founder of Ford Motor Company, earlier launched two automotive companies that failed.

Although these entrepreneurs encountered failure, they never allowed it prevent them from working towards success.

In case your good business idea has failed and you’re about quitting, below are five actionable steps you can take to regain stability:

1. Accept the truth

Many entrepreneurs are suppressed by their failures because they keep running from the truth. When a business idea fails, it’s pointless shading the truth or shying away from the reality. A failed business idea is a failed business idea, period! Microsoft, for example, came into existence as a result of Gates’ ability to accept the truththat Traf-O-Data had failed.

Steve Jobs, co-founder of Apple, once said, “If I try my best and fail, well I have tried my best.” Once business owners learn to accept the bitter truth that their excellent business idea has failed and cease investing their time, money, and energy trying to breathe life into it, getting back on track will become less difficult.

“The world won’t care about your self-esteem. The world will expect you to accomplish something BEFORE you feel good about yourself.” – Bill Gates

2. Take responsibility

One of the many wrong steps business owners and executives take after their great business idea fails is playing the blame game—that is, giving excuses for their failure. Whether you head an Inc. 500 company or a mom-and-pop store, you have to take responsibility when your good business idea fails.

Taking responsibility, in the case of a large organization, doesn’t mean avoiding to discipline anyone whose incompetence directly led to the failure. Rather, it means spending less time on passing blames and giving excuses, and focusing more on the way forward. Instead of shifting blame when a good business idea fails, take responsibility for the failure and ensure you prevent similar failures from reoccurring.

3. Ask “why?”

For every failure a business experiences, there’s always a cause. Most times, good ideas fail due to poor execution, improper planning, wrong managerial decisions and the absence of professional hands. Knowing every failure has a cause, you need to ask yourself, “Why did ‘X’ business idea fail?”

Bill Gates, one of the world’s most successful business leaders, once said, “It’s fine to celebrate success, but it is more important to heed the lessons of failure.” When you know the cause of the failure, you will be able to extract a lesson or two from the unpleasant event. These lessons, in the future, can serve as a mapguiding you on the pathway to success when you embark on a similar quest.

4. Avoid negativity

In entrepreneurship, failure is one ingredient that makes the journey worthwhile. Therefore when a business idea fails, entrepreneurs are left with only two options: to come up with a new idea or modify the existing one, and get going. Although this is the norm, many entrepreneurs never make it back up because of one thing: Negativity.

Negativity (or pessimism) alone can ravage any entrepreneur’s business journey. Embracing self-doubt, spending time with toxic individuals, and submitting one’s self to chance are loopholes through which negativity steps in to ruin an entrepreneur’s career. To gain stability after your good business idea fails, you must abstain from pessimistic thinking and build relationships with positive, like-minded individuals.

“Defeat is a state of mind; no one is ever defeated until defeat has been accepted as a reality.” – Bruce Lee

5. Take the punches and keep moving

The ability to get up and keep moving after experiencing multiple failures is what differentiates real entrepreneurs from “aspiring” entrepreneurs. Or borrowing Steve Jobs’ words, “I am convinced that about half of what separates successful entrepreneurs from the unsuccessful ones is pure perseverance.”

You are an entrepreneur. One with a goal, vision, and mission. You didn’t start out as an entrepreneur believing the journey would be filled with rainbows and unicorns, did you? When your best business idea fails, remember that you are an entrepreneur. And in entrepreneurship, throwing in the towel sooner than necessaryeven after experiencing failureis against the rules of the game.

How do you recover from a set back?  Comment below!

Continue Reading

Startups

‘Computer Says No’ Type People Are The Problem.

Published

on

Saying no without listening is the problem.

It’s the cause of why we fail to innovate. It’s a form of arrogance that focuses all of our energy on our own selfish thoughts. This never-ending pursuit of one’s self-importance is the cause of everything, as a human race, we do not want.

 

Ciggies, Panadol and Coke Zero enter the room.

Last week, I had a profitable business idea squashed by one of those computer says no types that this article is based on.

She entered the room.
Before I opened my mouth, she looked like she was pissed off and acted superior.

She then placed her half-smoked packet of ciggies, her full bottle of Coke Zero (who’s fooled by this so-called ‘healthy option’) and a fresh packet of Panadol on the table. If that’s not a cocktail of problems right, there then I don’t know what is – back to the story.

I explained the business proposition, and before I finished, she said no.

“That’s not how we do things.”
“Let’s create a project.”
“Let’s write a strategy.”
“We don’t have the resources.”

When is it ever the right time? When will we ever have the right strategy? From what I’ve seen, a project equals taking our time and wasting our competitive advantage. Success is about moving quickly. Success is about listening. Success is about trying new things and not following the old way.

 

It’s the lack of emotion that is the problem.

This story above was disappointing for the fact that there was no emotion. It wasn’t two people having a conversation; it was one person being unemotional like a computer and spitting out a generic answer, while the other person just wanted to be heard.

 

No one has all the answers.

The computer says no mindset suggests that there is a hierarchy. It suggests that some people should be worshipped while others should bow down. This old model of the business world died a long time ago.

“We’re all global citizens that are equal and deserve to be heard”

The very answers these computer says no people think they have are what needs to change. Their answers are built on old models and need an upgrade. There is no one answer. The solution to different problems is never the same and the solutions are forever changing. The market is forever changing. People are forever changing. Nothing is static. Everything is in flux.

 

They don’t listen; they just say no.

Listening is where everything begins. You’ll never be successful unless you learn to listen. Listening is a skill and it’s forgotten way too often. Less is more. Understanding the problem and being brilliant is in the listening.

“Most of the answers you seek are hidden in the dialogue you’re currently ignoring”

 

Next time the computer says no, tell the computer you’re only accepting yes.

Let’s not make this a whinge session. What can we do about these computer says no people? Tell them that you’re only accepting yes. Be relentless. Challenge them and make them feel uncomfortable. Don’t allow yourself to be ignored. Do all of this with respect.

Part of what causes these no responses is laziness. It’s easier to say no than it is to exuberate energy and try to say yes. Now I’m not saying the Panadol, Coke Zero and ciggies were the entire cause (or am I?) but energy sure plays a part. When we’re living in a state of perpetual tiredness, we make dumb, computer says no, decisions.

You do have energy though. Your energy can break through the no’s and somehow find a way to get to a yes. Don’t accept defeat. Refuse to fail.

 

It’s easy to say no.

No requires very little thought. No says “Let’s just remain the same and not change anything.”

No is the easy way out for these computer says no people. Don’t let them win so easily.

See their weakness for saying yes and challenge it.

 

Make them work for their no.

Get them to give you clear and articulate reasons as to why the answer is no. Don’t let them get away with being lazy. Force factual evidence to be provided. Bring other people in to support your rationale for them to say yes. Go up the line. Speak to their boss if you have to.

Whatever you do, make them work for their no. Don’t allow them to get away with being lazy.

Don’t let the human race fail to progress because someone is not willing to use critical thinking and spend time tackling issues head-on.

 

No doesn’t mean no.

No means not right now.
No means I’m scared.
No means I don’t understand.
No means I might be threatened by you.

Try to find the true meaning of why you’re being told no. Computer says no type people are often fearful and scared of uncertainty. They look for proven ways rather than going into the shadows and searching for the unknown – also known as a new approach.

 

All is not lost.

These people can be changed. We can change their mindset. All of us need to be part of the solution to stamp out this epidemic. Pointing out the problem is not enough; we must empower each other to be part of the solution.

 

***Final Thought***

Computer says no people are tearing apart good ideas. They’re preventing innovation and they must be stopped. You have the power to force them to change and to listen. It begins and ends with each one of us not allowing this mediocrity in our communities, companies and social lives to continue on.

I declare Computer Say’s No Behaviour unacceptable.

If you want to increase your productivity and learn some more valuable life hacks, then join my private mailing list on timdenning.net

Continue Reading

Startups

Process And Red Tape Does Not Equal Progress.

Published

on

The corporate world has taught me the truth about process and red tape:

“Process creates people who follow it and believe they are superior for doing so. The reality is that the people who question the process are the true heroes”

Obviously, some process is needed, but the traditional way makes no sense.

Here’s how to rethink process:

 

Most processes lack critical thinking.

Ask yourself “Why are we following this process?”

Modern business requires you to think and know why you do what you do. Just because it’s the way it’s always been done, does not make it’s functional or practical. My grandpa’s horse and cart was functional back in the 1920’s and today it’s a useless pile of junk.

Critical thinking is needed with respect to “process.” Don’t become a process sook.

 

A lot of processes are kept beyond their expiry date.

The challenge is that the digital world is moving so fast. The moment you invent a process, the customer starts to do something different. That’s why a flexible process with minimal framework is ideal.

The process must move with the market and the people who use the process.

” Too much process turns people into critics that ridicule anyone who goes ‘outside of process’ “

Process can quickly become a means for people to become critical and insult each other. Going outside of the process to make business happen (which pays the bills) is not something that should be looked down upon. Instead, when this happens, we need to ask why the process wasn’t suitable.

 

Every process should regularly be reviewed.

Okay, so you have to have a process for something. It needs to be continually challenged.

Why do we have this process?
What do customers think of it?
Is it still timely?
Are there any steps in the process we can remove?

Out of date processes are destroying your business and if you are working for a company that has to follow them, you become de-motivated quickly.

There’s always another business you can work for that doesn’t have the same dumb process, so keeping people becomes hard as well thanks to too much process.

 

Rounding up things together like sheep.

You can’t round people and businesses up like a flock of sheep.

No two people are the same.
No two businesses are the same.

Unfortunately, very few business and people are the same. I rejoice that fact otherwise life would suck big time. We’d become even more bored and spend more time looking at a not so smartphone.

Embrace individuality. Let people think outside the process box. You’ll be amazed by the results. You might even build the next Facebook by doing so. When I see a black cat, with a white spot on it’s back, walk under a ladder, I shout out loud and do a dance!

Praise the heavens for the fact that the black cat is busting an ancient superstition. It’s time to sing Superstitious by Stevie wonder and get back in the groove.

 

Process kills innovation.

For the record, I hate the word innovation. It’s a buzz word that is frequently used and rarely practiced. Innovation can only thrive when we have a growth mindset. A growth mindset says that nobody is right and nobody is wrong. We’re all right in our own way and we are all continuously learning.

You can’t have an innovative culture or workplace if you suffocate it with the lethal gas that is too much process. Process turns dreamers (innovators) into deranged zombies that can’t wait to get home and get drunk.

 

Imagine if Uber followed the process.

That’s right: What if Uber did what every other taxi company did? We’d have the same broken system that doesn’t serve the customer or the driver. We’d never know what it was like to book a service, and then walk away without pulling our wallet out.

 

Frustration with “the process” is good.

You know why I love it when people get pissed off at too much process? Because it creates the seed of entrepreneurs. Entrepreneurs can’t take too much process and they end up proving people wrong by going and doing something better themselves.

If people didn’t get pissed off by out of date process, then we wouldn’t have a lot of the tech giants we have today. So again, don’t let the negativity take over. Take the negativity that is process and go and fix the problem, and charge money for it.

For those that do, I look forward to your email in the future that says thank you. Your welcome for these words I write which encourage you to stand up to BS process that makes no sense. Rebels move the world forward with their passion and they spit in the face of being suppressed by mediocrity.

We all have potential.
We can all do crazy, awesome stuff.
Don’t let too much process ruin the fun party!

 

In conclusion….

Process kills dreams.
Process kills companies.
Process kills ideas.
Process kills people and their potential.

If you want to increase your productivity and learn some more valuable life hacks, then join my private mailing list on timdenning.net

Continue Reading

Startups

How To Create Exponential Growth In Your Company Using This Simple Strategy

Published

on

company growth

When it comes to business, the more of it you have, the easier it is for the business owner to see where the business will be in five, ten, even fifteen years. Good business is what we want, but great business is what we dream of having.

If you’re an entrepreneur with a startup company, or maybe you’re an old pro cultivating business every day, there’s one thing we can all agree on. Having more business and creating more success within our business would be a great end result at the end of this year.

But what is the secret? It seems some people blast out of the entrepreneurial gate and people immediately gravitate to them, while others get lost in the crowd and struggle for six months before finally giving up their dream. While this is a sad depiction of what could be in store for your business, it doesn’t have to be like this.

Enter Rohan Sheth, a self-made success who used to work the counter at McDonald’s but now runs the CEO desk at Rohan Sheth Consulting, a multi-million dollar company helping entrepreneurs realize their dreams. If anyone knows the secret of creating exponential growth within their company, it’s Mr. Sheth, and he explains these well-known, but little practiced strategies that can explode your business.

1. Stay Consistent

First and foremost, Mr. Sheth described consistency as one of the key parts in building a successful business. He says, “Legitimate consistency with engagement for your business will show relevancy with your audience and allow them the opportunity to connect with you on a personal level.”

Being consistent within your target audience begins to build a sense of trust and expertise within your community and it’s important to understand what your target market wants and needs and sticking to a plan which delivers on these needs daily/weekly.

If your priority on social media marketing is your Instagram account, then make a plan and stick with it. Post consistent and valuable content which will plant a seed within your congregation making you stand out from the rest of your competitors. Remember, if you’re constantly selling to them, they’re not going to listen. It takes perfect timing to understand when to sell and when to continually deliver content that will meet their needs.

Eventually, your consistency will begin to be shared by your audience. When this happens, they will begin expecting something from you at certain times throughout the day or week. For instance, let’s say you have a YouTube channel where you always upload a helpful video every Friday. After you have consistently shown your viewers you can deliver on what you promise, they will pounce on your video’s every time you upload them.

“Success isn’t always about greatness. It’s about consistency. Consistent hard work leads to success. Greatness will come.” – Dwayne Johnson

2. Build the Relationship

In the online world of business it can be very tempting and even easy to fall prey to data and statistics. Sometimes you may even find yourself pouring over data sheets and getting excited when a line goes up or down.

While statistics are a reliable way to grow your business, it’s not the way to build a personal relationship with that one person who needs your services. No one person is unimportant. Each individual within your reach has the power and the potential to reach hundreds, even thousands of their friends when you take the time to show them you really care. So how does this part happen?

This is when you get down and dirty and jump in the mix in your social channels and your email list. Reply to comments, answer questions, reach out and offer your services and advice when you see someone in need. These are all barrier breakers in the relationship building process and can mean the difference of someone walking away and becoming a high value brand ambassador for your business later.

I realize once your business grows on social media, you will begin to have more people than you’ll know what to do with. Nonetheless, it’s still important to reach out as much as possible and show the face behind the brand. When your audience does start to get large, think about creating opportunities with your channels or pages which can provide a sense of belonging to your target market.

For instance, give the mass of followers you have retained a name. This will make them feel like they are part of the bigger picture and will draw them in and help the relationship building process grow between them and your brand.

3. Solve a Problem For The Masses

In order to encourage exponential growth within your company you need to be making use of the technology around you.

Technology is enabling organizations to reach entirely new markets in massive and viral ways. As the world’s population approaches 7.5 billion, companies and organizations with exponential business models can help close the gap between our growing population and the resources they need.

Many companies start with one core offering to customers to serve one need—like Uber and personal transportation—then expand their services to meet other needs, like UberEATS or UberHEALTH.

Mr. Sheth says to learn about your audience through the data and statistics and develop a plan which can solve these bigger problems they are having. This is more like relationship building on steroids and works well when you have a larger audience. Because the audience is larger, when you do solve the problem, they feel the need to tell their friends about it and here comes the flood of new visitors to your business.

“There was never a night or a problem that could defeat sunrise or hope.” – Bernard Williams

In Conclusion

Every entrepreneur wants to realize their dream of owning a successful business which can touch the hearts, minds, and wallets of every person in their target market. But you cannot do that until you have a plan which will keep you and your team on track. Mr. Sheth’s strategies can help you develop these techniques and when you apply and tweak them according to your personal goals you will start to see your business growing exponentially within your niche.

Is it your goal to own a business or grow the business you’re currently in? If so, share with us in the comments how you are going about it so we can help everyone.

Continue Reading

Trending