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What Every Wannabe Entrepreneur And Influencer Forgets – It’s Not About You

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This is a message that you must listen to if you ever want to be a successful entrepreneur or influencer. It’s the only real secret that you need to strictly abide by at all times. IT’S NOT ABOUT YOU!!!!

If you fail to understand this one concept, then I promise you that you will never be anyone of influence or make any real money in business. So many people forget this one idea even though, in my humble opinion, it’s dead obvious and communicated frequently.

Have you ever been to an event and you meet someone for the first time who just talks about them self? Does it make you want to run in the opposite direction? Of course it does, and that’s why this lesson I am going to drill into your head today is so important.

Every influencer I have met through Addicted2Success, and every successful Silicon Valley Entrepreneur I have met through my day job, have all understood this concept, and they swear by it. You will fail no matter what if you don’t take the time to practice what I am going to talk about.

These seven rules below are how you make sure that what you do is about those you serve and not you:

Rule 1 – Building a personal brand is BS

The catch phrase that has existed since social media was invented and that is told to everyone is build your personal brand. Building a personal brand is total BS!

By building a personal brand, you are tell everyone online that what you do is all about you. Building a personal brand usually means posting content that always talks about yourself or has some stupid selfie of you doing something that doesn’t add any value to anyone’s life.

The way you build a personal brand is by not building your brand. Sounds confusing doesn’t it? It supposed to be because the only time you will build any brand is when you add value to people – end of story.

People that talk about themselves constantly on social media make me vomit, and I know you probably have the same feeling so don’t be like these fools! Find something you care about and share it with the world to help others. If you do this enough then maybe, just maybe, you might build a brand.

Rule 2 – Don’t have a big head

As you add values to other people’s lives, make sure you don’t do so with a big head or communicate in a way that makes you sound like you are better than everyone else. You’re not and neither am I. We are all global citizens of this world searching for our purpose so we can be fulfilled – that’s why we exist.

Sure, tell people when you have success in your life, talk about the things you do and what you’re good at, just don’t do it in a way that comes across as cocky. As an entrepreneur, you will never create a game-changing business by yourself; you must attract others to your mission.

No one will join your mission if you have a big fat head full of hot air and a disgusting sense of arrogance about you. What will build a monster business for you is the ability to inspire people in a way that makes them want to join your vision. This one tip can allow you to start the next UBER!

Rule 3 – Influence takes time

I meet lots of people at various events that I attend who try something for three months and then say no one is listening. We live in a busy world with loads of distractions and statistically it now takes someone sixteen interactions with a product before they respond.

Influence on social media or as an entrepreneur takes time. By time, I mean at least one year, and for the successful entrepreneurs I know, typically five years. So sit back, relax, take a chill pill, and make sure whatever it is you are doing is something you love otherwise you will never be able to have the patience it takes to succeed.

Rule 4 – Don’t establish a community only to help yourself

Someone said to me the other day, “Tim I’ve had this community for a while, and it’s not making me any money.” My response was “that’s because the community is not there to make you money it’s there to get something from you.”

What I meant when I said this is that you only get what you want when you give your community what they want. If you create a community just for the selfish purpose of making money, then you will be forgotten about quicker than last weeks mainstream TV news.

Rule 5 – A community is not there to flog stuff too

Directly related to my previous point, a community doesn’t exist just to be bombarded and flogged useless products that don’t serve them or that they never asked for. Instead, find stuff that has worked for you, and ask your community what problems they are having and how you can help.

“When every message you say to a group of people is proudly brought to you by some ridiculous product it get’s really painful really quickly”

If you are going to offer products and services, then give plenty of value first, and present what you can offer in a non-spammy way and don’t over do it bud!

Rule 6 – Be 100% transparent and share everything you know

Not only is what you do not about you but if you are going to lead a group of people as an influencer or an entrepreneur then make sure you are 100% transparent. If you want to supercharge your results even quicker then share everything you know.

A great example is Nathan Chan who is the creator of Foundr magazine. I saw him speak a few weeks ago, and the guy shared everything. He went into his financial affairs, shared legal issues he had, and even told us his social media strategy for a product he hasn’t even launched.

He had instant credibility in a room full of people who mostly didn’t know him, and it was damn infectious to see a guy just go all out and not hold anything back. The traits that Nathan displayed are the true essence of not being all about yourself.

Rule 7 – Don’t use someone else’s community and then screw them

Last rule of not being all about yourself is don’t help someone build their community and then screw them over and steal what you helped them create. When you help build someone else’s community you are doing so as a privilege.

You are doing so not because it’s all about you but because you believe in what the community stands for. What you get in return (although it’s not about you) is credibility that you didn’t have before, free education, and access to network with people.

By stealing something from someone else’s community, you are making things all about you and people will never transfer over to your own community if they know you stole something to get there – the truth about dishonest people travels faster than a shooting star.

Did any of these rules resonate with you? Let me know in the comments section below or on my website timdenning.net and my Facebook.

Tim is best known as a long-time contributor on Addicted2Success. Tim's content has been shared millions of times and he has written multiple viral posts all around personal development and entrepreneurship.You can connect with Tim through his website www.timdenning.net

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14 Comments

14 Comments

  1. Toño

    May 23, 2016 at 5:35 pm

    While I agree with this topic and the main idea, I want to share my thoughts regarding personal brand. I actually see nothing wrong when provided content is about author’s persona, I can see lots of youtube channels filled with videos like how I spend my day, what I eat/wear, where to buy this or that etc, and those channels gots million of views and subscribers. The same goes with facebook or instagram accounts, where yes, you can mostly see the pathetic selfies, yet people loves them so much they can spend hours of their lives there. Social media now more popular than tv series, and many people treat new video like some new episode of their favourite show. However, there’s one little thing I would like to mention – before you goes all over yourslef, you have to do something for others first.

    I actually would really enjoy to see some kind of vlog about your daily life, your travel site or just something you may want to share, but this is because I feel connection to the ideas you share with us, and attachment to everything you do. I trust you and most likely will listen/watch any of your content, knowing the value you will add to my life.

    But you need to build that base before you go into something personal, I agree.

    Just a quick definition of what I learned from this article:

    Rule # 3 Simply magical and very important to understand. I’ve seen a picture of two men, mining to the gold. One stopped just inches away and turned back, the other one kept going patiently because he believed, loved and enjoyed what he was doing, and, as a result, huge reward at the end. Patience is a virtue and with all of the abundance of resources we have today it surely will take some time for others to notice you.

    Rule #6 Strong people don’t get other’s down.. They lift them Up. A simple message taken from your paragraph. And yes, I am a big fan of Foundr mag instagram. They provide valuable stuff there every single day, it’s amazing.

    Thank you for quality material once again, my friend, and I have finally found the time to express myself here 🙂 Much love and appreciation, stay well and healthy!

    • Tim Denning

      May 23, 2016 at 6:53 pm

      Toño thanks for your clarification around personal brand. The article mostly talks about personal brand being BS because it’s generally not done in the manner you described. If someone is giving heaps of value first and then they occasionally promote their own personal brand then that’s okay. The majority of personal brand approaches involves a rather selfish angle which i don’t this is valuable and it usually doesn’t work.

      Your comments about vlog’s has actually got me thinking…lol. I do post a few videos under the Addicted2Success Youtube channel including some interviews so check them out.

      Glad you love Foundr mag too it’s a great resource and their picture quotes are some of the best I have seen. Speak soon Toño.

  2. Cary Hokama

    May 23, 2016 at 4:45 am

    This article was so timely and perfect, Tim. Thank you. What’s crazy is that I happened to sign up for Nathan Chan’s social media strategy product, haha. This article immediately cemented his credibility level.

    • Tim Denning

      May 23, 2016 at 8:53 am

      Cary that’s awesome that you signed up for Nathan Chan’s Foundr course and then randomly read my article with his name mentioned in it. Glad you liked the article and thanks for reading.

  3. Todd Young

    May 20, 2016 at 7:07 pm

    Spot on business brief Tim!

    • Tim Denning

      May 21, 2016 at 1:57 am

      Thanks Todd and glad you connected with the post.

  4. Jeff Damulira

    May 18, 2016 at 7:12 pm

    Brilliant point of view 🙂

  5. Andre Steynberg

    May 18, 2016 at 2:50 pm

    Very insightful article – resonates perfectly with my personal thoughts!

    • Tim Denning

      May 19, 2016 at 11:28 pm

      Thanks Andre it seems to be what a lot of people are thinking right now including me!

  6. Rob Malone

    May 18, 2016 at 1:39 pm

    Hi Tim, Great article. I really like your point about personal branding is BS. I had never thought about that before but after reading your view I felt like you were dead on.

    Also Rule #6 about transparency is huge and also very difficult for people. You have to get past feeling vulnerable. Jack Stack wrote and awesome book about 20 years ago called The Great Game Of Business and he demonstrated the power of complete transparency in building a business.

    Great article and great rules. Thanks for sharing.

    • Tim Denning

      May 19, 2016 at 11:30 pm

      Cheers Rob. Personal branding is BS and I am glad you see the light. Having studied many successful businesses I agree with you that transparency is like the secret ingredient. I will make sure I suss out Jack’s book and thanks for the recommendation.

  7. deepa hajong

    May 18, 2016 at 8:32 am

    Awesome article

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Entrepreneurs

5 Skills I Learned in the Military That Helped Me Become a Successful Entrepreneur

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The moves I’ve made in my career from the military, to the mining industry, to running a multinational business in Latin America, aren’t linear. It’s not every day an ex-Australian military officer finds their niche in Latin American business.

Graduating from Australia’s Royal Military College and Defense Force Academy, I served as a commissioned officer in the Australian Army for nearly 11 years, completing operational tours to Central Asia and the Middle East.

The transition from various Army engineering and infantry roles through to managing a team of legal and financial executives was neither quick nor painless. But, as I entered the company formation process, I found my military service played a significant role in shaping my entrepreneurial fitness. The skills I developed in the Australian Defense Force supported me through several commercial iterations more than once.

Here are some of the key connections I drew between core military values and those I apply to the boardroom environment:

1. Be calculated and decisive

Unsurprisingly, a crucial requisite of military functionality is working quickly and effectively under pressure. This rings especially true for the strategic planners of operations: the commissioned and non-commissioned officers.

My military role made tough demands on me to decide on the best course of action for myself and my team. When deployed overseas, making the wrong decision or not making a decision fast enough could mean failing our mission, and putting people in danger.

In business, it’s vital to understand, analyze and communicate the risks involved in the options laid out before you at various stages. Making offers to clients, moving into a new market, investing large amounts of money into projects. And decisions need to be made based on this analysis before these opportunities pass by.

I can confidently draw on my experiences in service to act fast and capitalize on opportunities as they become available, and make tough decisions in high-pressure situations.

“You cannot make progress without making decisions.” – Jim Rohn

2. Resilience is key

Resilience is fundamental to success in any military career. In training and on operations, one soldier’s spiralling morale could put an entire section in danger. Military personnel are vetted for their adaptability and mental strength from day one, using tried-and-true techniques to push people to their limits.

Having a high level of resilience allows you to cope when things don’t go to plan in business. Investments might not show returns as quickly as hoped, a competitor snatches up an important client, or a difficult situation arises between staff that needs careful management.

I can confidently draw on military-learned techniques to support my own and others’ resilience in the office. Being able to maintain a high level of morale among teams fosters productivity and a willingness to ‘soldier on’ in challenging situations.

3. Leadership and cooperation

People in leadership positions are those that others turn to for advice and support. As a leader, you have to be prepared to make tough decisions that others can’t or won’t. A high-performing team has a courageous, empowering, and communicative leader at its helm.

This is as true in the military as it is in business. Building the right team and driving them to success is both challenging and rewarding – whether the outcome is securing a key logistical foothold to allow aid and other supplies to travel into a war-torn area, or seeing a newly-opened office secure its first major client.

4. Discipline

Not every soldier has an easy time appreciating the ubiquity of drills in their military workplace, nor their role in underpinning the success of a smooth operation. But a lack of discipline is tantamount to putting oneself and others at risk. Ignoring lawful orders, or not applying proper first-aid to a fellow soldier, are a couple of examples of this.

To me, commercial discipline means being professional always, even in stressful or frustrating situations. Maintain integrity in everything you do, and don’t cut corners. Carrying out proper legal and financial procedures means staying compliant under local law, and avoiding complications with authorities.

Staying committed to an objective and refusing to drop standards enables you to build a credible reputation for your business that clients hold in high regard.

“We don’t have to be smarter than the rest, we have to be more disciplined than the rest.” – Warren Buffett

5. Cultural awareness

Finally, but no less importantly, showing respect for cultural customs in business is essential for cultivating strong professional relationships. Being aware of your cultural background, and sensitive to those of others, will help build social connections, and make you more relatable to others.

Foreign militaries operating in troubled parts of the world understand that building trust with local individuals and communities is imperative. Without that trust, moving around becomes difficult and more dangerous. To gain trust, soldiers must show respect for people’s culture and way of life.

The same is true in business. A small hiccup such as not shaking hands, or giving an air-kiss to a new acquaintance here in Latin America could start an entire working relationship off on the wrong foot. Cultural sensitivity shows a willingness to embrace people and their society. Never underestimate the significance people place on this element when evaluating your suitability as a professional partner.

It’s no secret that commercial success requires passion, hard work, and dedication. Don’t be afraid to call upon your own and others’ previous experiences to find solutions to problems or forge ahead with complex projects. For military personnel considering testing out their business acumen, be confident that your years of service to your country have also set you up for success in the world of business.

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3 Scientifically Proven Things Entrepreneurs Should Be Doing to Increase Overall Performance

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Many of us know that becoming an entrepreneur isn’t easy. Most are working very long hours, seven days a week, and are making tremendous sacrifices to ensure their businesses are increasing in all areas. They are actually building empires right?

While this type of mindset is okay for a season, many get stuck in the vicious cycle of working non-stop and not taking care of themselves. We all know working hard definitely has its rewards and benefits, but overworking can lead to many unnecessary and unhealthy developments.

Below are 3 things entrepreneurs should be taking advantage of, in order to develop a proper work-life balance and still stay ahead of the eight ball:

1. Get enough sleep

Many of us have been programmed to think that you have to work hard and long in order to be successful in life. While working hard is very important to becoming successful, recent studies have shown that getting the proper amount of sleep is even more important. Studies have shown that sleep deprivation is one of the main causes of stress and burnout in the lives of many people.

Arianna Huffington is a huge advocate for getting a minimum of eight hours of sleep per day, in order to improve our decision-making, well-being, creativity, and productivity. Those bragging about only getting four to five hours of sleep are actually admitting that they are not functioning or performing at their maximum potential.

Researchers have also shown that when you are getting seven to eight hours of sleep, your brain signals your body to release hormones and compounds that assist in brain memory, maintaining your immune system, and decreasing risks in health conditions. Therefore, getting enough quality sleep is key for a healthy lifestyle.

“There’s practically no element of our lives that’s not improved by getting adequate sleep.” – Arianna Huffington

2. Take vacations

Studies show that there are multiple health benefits of vacationing. A few of them consist of less stress, decreased depression, improved productivity, and improved mental health. Who wouldn’t want to experience that right? The ones who break away from the day-to-day functions of working, to go on vacation usually come back on fire and ready to keep crushing their goals.

Vacationing allows you to really put things into perspective, not only for yourself, but for your business as well. Taking vacations gives you the opportunity to unplug and spend that much needed quality time with yourself and your loved ones.

It also gives you time to relax, reflect, and recharge. In doing so, research shows that you come back refreshed and ready to function at peak performance. You also get to have fun, visit really cool places and check off destinations on your bucket list.

3. Take breaks

No matter how much you love your work, you can’t continue to be a driving force while running on empty. CEO Chris Cavallini, of the multi million dollar company Nutrition Solutions, believes in this principal one hundred percent and stands firm on the idea that taking a 60 second break every hour will reboot, recharge, and refocus your mind, body and spirit.

It makes the team more efficient and productive, says Chris. Many times a quick mental or physical shift is all you need, to come back to work with more creativity and more energy for your next breakthrough.

“Almost everything will work again if you unplug it for a few minutes…including you.” – Anne Lamott

Recent studies have shown that those who experience constant stimulation of the same thing, is registered by our brains as unimportant, to the point that our brain erases it from our awareness.

They also show that taking a two-minute break can increase productivity by as much as 11.15%. Since entrepreneurs are constantly on the go, several short breaks through out the day should definitely be included due to all of the amazing benefits they provide.

Some of the things you could do on your breaks that will increase performance and productivity include, standing and stretching, resting your eyes, quick exercises like jumping jacks, push ups, sit ups, or pull ups and even checking your social media.

The next time you feel like you don’t have time to take a break, think about all the benefits you’ll miss out on by not taking one.

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12 Essential Skills Required to Succeed as an Entrepreneur

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There are lots of unwritten rules about the right set of skills needed to succeed as an entrepreneur. No doubt, entrepreneurs are filled with a sense of uncertainty on the right set of skills they need to acquire. So, how do successful entrepreneurs know the right skills to integrate into their operations? This is the million dollar question, and it’s time to answer it!

As an aspiring or veteran entrepreneur, here are some of the essential skills you need to succeed as an entrepreneur:

1. Money Management

Let’s face it, you can’t achieve your entrepreneurial goals if you don’t know how to manage your finances. You need to put structures in place to monitor where your income and expenses come from.

Ask yourself if you are spending more than you earn, and also calculate your savings ratio. You need to keep yourself informed of the latest financial investment rules and how to navigate your business through difficult situations.

2. Ambition

Yes, ambition is one of the hardest skills for entrepreneurs. The aim is the skill you need to keep going when situations become dire. It’s the ability to know your destination and not to lose focus.

Successful entrepreneurs have an aggressive nature, and this is what drives them to work hard. More so, their dynamic environment keeps them cautious and always on the alert for windfalls.

3. Willingness to Learn

Learning is a continuous process. Most entrepreneurs make the mistake of restricting their education to their educational institution. Instead, knowledge is a life-long process, and it’s an essential skill for successful entrepreneurs. Therefore, you must be updated with recent events in technology, your environment, and your industry. Remember, even old dogs can learn new tricks!

4. Creativity

You need creative skills to succeed as an entrepreneur. Trying out the same thing over and over will still generate the same result. Therefore, you need to harness your creativity to discover new methods of doing things. Mind you, being creative doesn’t mean you have to do something drastic. Sometimes, it requires simple actions such as talking to people or taking up new skills.

“Creative thinking inspires ideas. Ideas inspire change.” – Barbara Januszkiewicz

5. Productivity

Successful entrepreneurs have learned how to harness their productivity skills by discovered what is productive for them, and adhering to it. More so, successful entrepreneurs increase their productivity by working at energy peak levels. Lastly, utilize the productivity tool that works for you and improves on it throughout your entrepreneurial journey.

6. Social Skills

Some entrepreneurs downplay the importance of social skills. This group of people fail to realize that you improve your chances of success by walking with the right people. Search for entrepreneurs with similar goals and observe how they overcame challenges. Furthermore, study their success strategies; this will help you to perfect your business plans.

7. Management Skills

It’s not enough to learn the skills as mentioned above without improving your management skills. As an entrepreneur, you will need to manage your workers effectively to get the right result. This is the time to learn how to encourage, develop, and support your employees. Learning a management skill will help you to recognize and allocate tasks in tandem with their strengths and weakness.

8. Social Media Proficiency

Here’s one skill that can shape the landscape of your business. Yes, social media is an integral part of your success as an entrepreneur. In the initial phase of your business, you will need to assume the role of a social media manager, and this involves knowing how to navigate and use social media platforms.

9. Perseverance

Every successful entrepreneur has experienced failures and crippling defeats. They were able to survive these dire situations when many others lost their businesses. Successful entrepreneurs persevere through these hard moments by choosing to learn and make calculated decisions from experience.

“It’s perseverance that’s the key. It’s persevering for long enough to achieve your potential.” – Lynn Davies

10. Time Management

Time management is considered a valuable skill by a successful entrepreneur. With time management, you need to have a detailed plan or schedule for your daily tasks. More so, this skill helps you to prioritize tasks and how to tackle the important ones.

Time management helps you to battle procrastination when making crucial and everyday business decisions. Think of time management as one of the hard skills for entrepreneurs. Remember, you will never achieve your goals without gaining mastery over your time.

11. Communication

It doesn’t matter if you run a small business or a large corporation. It is imperative for you to know how to communicate effectively with your clients, mentors, stakeholders, and even your employees.

It’s one skill that’s crucial to your success as an entrepreneur. Why? You won’t succeed if you can’t communicate the values of your brand. So, you need to master all forms of communication. What’s more? You need to show your employees the importance of effective communication.

12. Business Strategy

Having a business strategy is considered an essential skill for successful entrepreneurs. Although most entrepreneurs reached the pinnacle of their careers through sheer will and strength, it’s necessary to have a business strategy. Utilize the skills mentioned above to create a business structure that’ll stand the test of time.

We’ve successfully created a list of skills to succeed as an entrepreneur. No doubt, it’s been an eventful journey. Now, all you need is to integrate these skills into your mode of operations. Practice these skills until it becomes the core of your business operations.

Which one of the above 12 skills do you feel is most important for an entrepreneur? Share your thoughts below!

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Entrepreneurs

Earn More When You Adopt These 7 Habits of Successful Entrepreneurs

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As an entrepreneur, you’re always on the lookout for the next big moneymaker. But what if I told you that the wealth that you strive for is already at your fingertips? You are your own best asset because by learning how to become your most effective self, you will maximize your earning potential and realize your dreams of entrepreneurship. (more…)

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